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Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Tibetian Army weapon/sword Reply to topic
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Chris Artman




Location: USA
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2008 9:00 am    Post subject: Tibetian Army weapon/sword         Reply with quote

I was talking with a friend a little while back and they mentioned something about a historical war involving the UK. Something about how the UK hired the Tibetian army to win a certain war. apparently the weapon/sword they used was devastating and felt responsible for winning this war... Does anyone know what my friend is talking about?
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R D Moore




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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2008 1:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Perhaps your friend was thinkng of the Ghurka's? http://www.m4040.com/Survival/Ghurka/History%...0Kukri.htm
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Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
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PostPosted: Wed 17 Sep, 2008 10:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Definitely the Gurkhas. The British fought against them at first, were impressed by their fighting abilities, and eventually began to recruit them into the Imperial army (and now the British Army). They're technically Nepalese, not Tibetan, but national-ethnic boundaries back then in the 19th century (when the British first recruited the Gurkhas) weren't as clear-cut as they are today.
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Bennison N




Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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PostPosted: Thu 18 Sep, 2008 3:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That would mean the sword you're talking about is the Khukri/kukri/khukuri (.खुकुरी in Nepalese Devanagari script).

They have recurved blades, like Falcata or Kopises. In fact, I've often heard it said that the Macedonians introduced the shape to the region with the advance of Alexander. The Macedonian standard cavalry blade was the Falcata.

They most certainly ARE very powerful weapons. Amazing for cutting, and the shape pulls the blade into a thrust wound.

Lots of lore attached too. Very feared by the Japanese troops during WW2. And apparently, once a traditionally trained warrior draws, they can't be re-sheathed without shedding blood.

I have one. It's not a big one, and it's not a standard military issue one, but it's a very nice one, save for a bit of damage to the point of the scabbard. I'll take a picture and show you. I spent a while learning how to use one like a Ghurka back in '96.

Google them. Also, SFI has a whole forum devoted to them.

"Never give a sword to a man who can't dance" - Confucius

अजयखड्गधारी
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William C Champlin




Location: San Antonio,Texas USA
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PostPosted: Thu 18 Sep, 2008 9:33 pm    Post subject: Tibetan army weapon/sword         Reply with quote

I read an account from german soldiers in WWI that said they feared the gurkas and some thought they were impossible to kill. I imagine even after encountering various "colonial" british and french troops these guys with their strange knives were something new and scary. Then again, they were told that the american "farm boys" couldn't fight or shoot very well.W
tweetchris
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Christopher H





Joined: 06 Mar 2008

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PostPosted: Fri 19 Sep, 2008 5:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bennison N wrote:

Lots of lore attached too. Very feared by the Japanese troops during WW2. And apparently, once a traditionally trained warrior draws, they can't be re-sheathed without shedding blood.


Definitely a piece of lore in my opinion...
Quote:
It is important to remember that the kukri is a tool of all work, at home in the hills and on active service it will be used for cutting wood, hunting and skinning, opening tins, clearing undergrowth and any other chore. From this it is plain there can be no truth in the belief that a Gurkha must draw blood every time before he may return the kukri to its sheath.
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Bennison N




Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 1:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh yeah... A lot of lore attached...
"Never give a sword to a man who can't dance" - Confucius

अजयखड्गधारी
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