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Raymond Deancona





Joined: 04 Mar 2004

Posts: 429

PostPosted: Thu 29 May, 2008 11:02 am    Post subject: Does anyone have a review of the CAS Practical Norman?         Reply with quote

Does anyone have a review of the CAS Practical Norman?
Any thoughts would be much appreciated. I am looking more toward its durability,
strength and tightness of construction - no rattles, etc!
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Steven McIntyre




Location: Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Joined: 03 Sep 2006

Posts: 41

PostPosted: Thu 29 May, 2008 2:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I picked one up about a month ago, and I'm very happy with it (only done dry handling). Fittings are nice and tight; no movement whatsoever. Balance feels really nice, and I have great control during swings. Only negative is the last inch or so of the blade is really snug in the ABS scabbard it comes with.
~PER ARDUA~
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Douglas S





Joined: 18 Feb 2004

Posts: 177

PostPosted: Thu 29 May, 2008 4:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I bought one and returned it.

The shape of the blade generally was like nothing I have seen in the period historically. There was a weird sort of triple fuller and a Neanderthal-blunt (almost square) tip.

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Douglas S





Joined: 18 Feb 2004

Posts: 177

PostPosted: Thu 29 May, 2008 4:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here's the tip:
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Bren O




Location: Western Australia
Joined: 14 Sep 2006
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Posts: 24

PostPosted: Thu 29 May, 2008 9:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ive got the practical hand and half, as well as the practical viking by Hanwei. I can only say good things about these for their price. All the hilt parts are glued together to support peening which may not be so thorough (possibly cosmetic only - relying only on the glue.) Otherwise the quality of the steel, hardness, durability, flexibilty while returning to true, are all very satisfactory.

At a good price they are a bargain.

First, learn to use this...
It'll teach you to use this.
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Greg Mele
Industry Professional



Location: Chicago, IL USA
Joined: 20 Mar 2006

Posts: 356

PostPosted: Fri 30 May, 2008 9:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I own one and we used it recently for some fairly vigorous fencing. Like all of the Hanwei practical swords, it is the question of is it a good value for the money. I'd say absolutely. The sword balances well in the hand, making it feel lighter than it is and is *very* durable. Although a little stiff in the thrust, it is much more flexible than the practical arming sword based on their "William Marshal" sword.

Is this as Albion I.33? Hell no! But for the price, it's a bargain.

Greg Mele
Chicago Swordplay Guild
www.chicagoswordplayguild.com

www.freelanceacademypress.com
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Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Fri 30 May, 2008 10:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

[quote="Douglas S"]I bought one and returned it.

The shape of the blade generally was like nothing I have seen in the period historically. There was a weird sort of triple fuller and a Neanderthal-blunt (almost square) tip.

quote]

All of the latest revisions of the Hanwei Practical Medieval swords are fullered in the same manner as the Norman. Their blades' purpose is to be light, strong, and durable, and to be able to take the abuse given to a reenactment or stage combat (edge parries) sword. Therefore they don't look like a real Medieval blade. If you look at the released Albion Maestros, their blades are also different than standard Medieval ones.

I have an Albion I:33, and it is very nice. However, I could have bought 4 Practical Normans (with scabbards) for the same price as I paid for the I:33.
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Greg Mele
Industry Professional



Location: Chicago, IL USA
Joined: 20 Mar 2006

Posts: 356

PostPosted: Fri 30 May, 2008 11:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

[quote="Roger Hooper"]
Douglas S wrote:
I bought one and returned it.

The shape of the blade generally was like nothing I have seen in the period historically. There was a weird sort of triple fuller and a Neanderthal-blunt (almost square) tip.

quote]

All of the latest revisions of the Hanwei Practical Medieval swords are fullered in the same manner as the Norman. Their blades' purpose is to be light, strong, and durable, and to be able to take the abuse given to a reenactment or stage combat (edge parries) sword. Therefore they don't look like a real Medieval blade. If you look at the released Albion Maestros, their blades are also different than standard Medieval ones.

I have an Albion I:33, and it is very nice. However, I could have bought 4 Practical Normans (with scabbards) for the same price as I paid for the I:33.


Precisely. It also doesn't weigh nearly what many of the UK reenactment blades do with 3mm edges and the like. They look like swords, but feel nothing like them.

The fuller is a-historical, but fairly subtle. The triple fullers on the other practicals, however, are more or less like those recommend by Rene d'Anjou for his tournament swords, which I find kind of cool. Now if only the arming sword FLEXED! Wink But multiple fullers also equals multiple risers...

Greg Mele
Chicago Swordplay Guild
www.chicagoswordplayguild.com

www.freelanceacademypress.com
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Douglas S





Joined: 18 Feb 2004

Posts: 177

PostPosted: Sun 01 Jun, 2008 10:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It depends on how rigorous your group's authenticity standards are, at the end of the day. BTW, Paul Binn adds a deep, wide fuller to minimize the weight and makes the pommel heavier to compensate for the blade thickness. With good balance, it's easy to forget about the weight.
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