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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Sun 11 May, 2008 1:18 pm    Post subject: Utility/eating knife from the late 14th C         Reply with quote

While looking through Knives and Scabbards for inspiration for another knife project, I found it in #133, on page 96. It's a knife fragment - actually only the hilt remains, the blade having corroded completely away - which was dated to the late 14th C. In the sake of academic interest, here's the line drawing from that book (if this is inappropriate, I'll remove it):


As the blade was gone, I used blades from art and surviving examples of the time as guidelines to generate one that may well have been. The original had boxwood scales held with iron rivets. I did not follow this lead in this piece. Instead, I had some beautiful figured walnut which I used - when sanded to a fine grit and then hand-rubbed with Danish oil, it's just a beautiful wood. Also, a couple of months back, in Gordon's post about his wife's historical knife (link to thread), Peter Johnsson had discussed tubular rivets. Since then, I have been wanting to give this a go... The rivets are 1/8 inch brass tubing, placed in a similar method as described by Peter in his post in the thread referenced above.

So... without further ado...


The blade is heat-treated, tempered, and hand ground out of 6150. It has an overall length of 9 inches, 4 7/8 inches of which is blade. It will make an excellent utility/eating knife.

Thanks to the 14th C craftsman who made the interesting original piece, and to Peter for the nudge to give the tubular rivets a go.

This piece is spoken for.
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Dan P




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PostPosted: Sun 11 May, 2008 6:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thats a nice little knife there, great wood on the handle. Did you make a sheath to go with it?
A steel like 6150 seems like "quality overkill" for a blade that small to me... of course that's never a bad thing!
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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2008 5:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks, Dan!

I did not make a sheath to accompany this piece - the gentleman didn't want one, as he'd like to do that himself.


As to the steel choice, it was that ,O1, or ATS35. We opted to go with the spring. I really like the way the 6150 works and finishes. He intends to use this knife regularly as an eating and utility knife, so I wanted to give him a solid piece.
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2008 6:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Another beauty! As the economy tanks, I find knives more appealing every day Big Grin

Great job with the rivets! I mean, the grip and blade are wonderful, too, but as someone headed into a tubular rivet project I'm especially keen to see other examples of that.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2008 6:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Aaron,
Nice job! Clean and simple; I like that. I think knives are under-served in today's market. Daggers seem to be much more plentiful in the market, but the everyday-carry tools that must have been ubiquitous (perhaps more plentiful than specialized war daggers) don't seem to get as much attention.

Again, nice job.

Happy

ChadA

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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2008 6:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
Another beauty! As the economy tanks, I find knives more appealing every day Big Grin

Great job with the rivets! I mean, the grip and blade are wonderful, too, but as someone headed into a tubular rivet project I'm especially keen to see other examples of that.


Chad Arnow wrote:
Aaron,
Nice job! Clean and simple; I like that. I think knives are under-served in today's market. Daggers seem to be much more plentiful in the market, but the everyday-carry tools that must have been ubiquitous (perhaps more plentiful than specialized war daggers) don't seem to get as much attention.

Again, nice job.


Thanks, gents!

Chad, I think you hit precisely on the point that these appeal to me as much as they do - they were (and still are) the every-man's tool. How many of us carry a utility knife of some sort with us today? How often do we use it? Most were probably fairly simple, but some were wicked-fancy (like the beautiful German knife set that Tod just posted about here not long ago). In this case, a piece appropriate for the middle class was requested. Nice, but not extravagant. Hopefully this hits the mark.


Sean, the rivets were really pretty smooth. A couple of small caveats - of course, don't get glue in the barrel of the tube. Also, flaring them slightly will set the scales nicely, but this doesn't have to be much at all. The brass is soft, so I took a long drift and gently flared out the outer edge like the bell (is that the right term, Chad?) on a brass instrument. That's obviously a gross exaggeration - flaring it out that much would be way overkill - it just was a matter of a few thousandths of an inch, but plenty to secure the piece. I am very much looking forward to seeing your project come to life!
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Ken Speed





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PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2008 3:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Aaron,

Was the Bauhaus school designing knives in the 14th century? This a a beautiful knife and it doesn't look at all like a "period" knife quite the contrary it looks like it is a space age scalping knife!

Ken
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Jared Smith




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PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2008 4:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like the tubular rivets. Nice variation, and also historically relevant and believable. I use a similar blade form (also a hand made knife) for my regular kitchen steak knives. Very satisfying!
Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Tue 13 May, 2008 12:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A lovely little knife and very cleanly done so congratulations and I also agree, the small eating knives are items I love making, they are often understated but I find are just likeable.

There is a lovely cheats way of setting tubular rivets. Fit the rivet tube, either split or seamless, into the handle and file it flat to the handle. Set a small counter sink that goes right to a point into a vice with the point upwards; place one side of the tube onto this countersink and put a similar countersink into your battery drill. Hold the knife with one hand onto the countersink and press down with the drill mounted countersink with the other and rev the drill in REVERSE. It is a bit like metal spinning and will deform the rivet out very easily and cleanly. The bottom sink bites very slightly and stops the tube from spinning, the top sink flares it out. Flip the knife over and do the other side - job jobbed.

Liability clause - try this a couple of times before doing it on your new prize project

Very bad things happen to your knife if run the top sink forward - always run it in REVERSE

For wood there is no need to countersink, for horn or bone make a tiny sink.

Hollow rivets are particularly good for setting thin bone scales as they much reduce the chance of splitting that is easily possible with solid rivets.

Good luck

Tod

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