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Howard Waddell
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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PostPosted: Sat 20 Mar, 2004 10:57 am    Post subject: Draft Article for your review         Reply with quote

This is the second in a continuing series of articles we have been working on to explain the processes we use in the making of our swords. (There is a little repetition between this one and the one accessible at the top of our page, but the idea is to make each one stand alone as well as be part of a series.)

http://albionarmorers.com/components.htm

Please let me know what you think.

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
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Jeremiah Swanger




Location: Hershey, PA
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PostPosted: Sat 20 Mar, 2004 11:10 am    Post subject: Re: Draft Article for your review         Reply with quote

Howard Waddell wrote:
This is the second in a continuing series of articles we have been working on to explain the processes we use in the making of our swords. (There is a little repetition between this one and the one accessible at the top of our page, but the idea is to make each one stand alone as well as be part of a series.)

http://albionarmorers.com/components.htm

Please let me know what you think.

Best,

Howy


Hi Howy,

I just read through it- I thought it was extremely interesting and answered a lot of questions- I know a bunch of people who would like to know how a sword is made...

Also, it provides a lot of insight into just how much work goes into each sword- it's absolutely amazing! There are some people who were a little skeptical about the pricing for the Next Generation line, but, now that I see all the work that goes into each individual sword, I am more than convinced that the Next Generation line of Albion Mark swords is a real value.

I see you have some more articles coming out soon. I really look forward to them. My young mind thirsts for new knowledge, my friend! Cool

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Rhaegar fought valiantly.
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And Rhaegar died."

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David McElrea




Location: Canada
Joined: 26 Nov 2003

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PostPosted: Sat 20 Mar, 2004 11:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Howy,

It's an excellent article-- thanks for the insight into the different levels of craftsmanship that go into each blade. I think it balances well with the earlier article. While, as you say, there may be some repetition, it works well and doesn't feel redundant in its context.

I have to "tip my hat" to your decision to be so transparent in your creative processes. As a customer it makes me feel like I have been made privy to the work that goes into my sword-- making it feel that much more personal. Also, it shows your work to be of the highest caliber (if you will excuse my mixing metaphors)--Quality needs no shadows to hide in.

Regards,

David
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Brian M




Location: Austin, TX
Joined: 01 Oct 2003

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PostPosted: Sat 20 Mar, 2004 12:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very informative, Howy. I had some idea how the casting process worked, but frankly I was amazed to see how much work has to be done (by you) on the rough castings. It gives me a much better conception of how much time and effort is involved -- to say nothing of the blade manufacture. I think this and upcoming articles will educate a lot of people who might otherwise just "shop price" when looking at swords, if you know what I mean.
Looking forward to my own Baron, next week perhaps.

Brian M
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Gary Grzybek




Location: Stillwater N.J.
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

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PostPosted: Sat 20 Mar, 2004 1:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Howy!

I had no doubt about the extensive amount of work that goes into these weapons although it's very helpful to see much of the process in writing to get a better understanding.

Spreading the word,

Gary Grzybek
ARMA Northern N.J.
www.armastudy.org
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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Sat 20 Mar, 2004 10:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Neat concept and a good read. I look forward to the of the series.
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Mon 22 Mar, 2004 6:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey Howy, this article is really quite good.. I can't wait to see the next installments and the whole thing as one cohesive piece. Very nice.
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Bill Grandy
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PostPosted: Mon 22 Mar, 2004 6:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Finally had some time to actually read the entire article in one sitting. Fantastic stuff! I think many people underestimate the process of casting. I think some people assume that it's just a matter of pouring some metal in a mold, and presto, you're done.

I recall people thinking Gus's swords were also easily made. They assumed that he just punches in some numbers in a CNC machine, and out comes a finished sword blade. Articles like this show that even though we have modern means of mass production, there's still a lot of personal human interaction with the making of these swords.
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Jon C. Webb




Location: Ada, OK
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PostPosted: Mon 22 Mar, 2004 9:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Howy,
Thanks for the clear explanations and helpful photos allowing me to see the literal processes involved in casting. I look forward to my first Albion.
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Alexi Goranov
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Mar, 2004 10:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Howy,

Even if I may sound somewhat redundant : Great article! Exclamation

After reading it I had few questions, so I decided to post them here.

The article mentions that the wooden core of the grip is "epoxied permanently into place". Does that allow changing the grip, is a customer later wants a different size/shape grip or if this one gets damaged for whatever reason?

Also, how were period grips stably fitted into place? Apparently hilt components of period swords were sometimes changed to reflect new fashions or due to damage, so how did they do that?

I am asking these questions more from the perspective of how swords were assembled centuries ago, and there is no criticism intended. I am sure the Albion crew does its best to make high-quality, period reproductions.

We have not head yet about the wire grip options on Albion swords Cool (hint, hint) Since few people asked (on another thread) I am raising the issue again.

Cheers,

Alexi
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Howard Waddell
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Mar, 2004 10:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Alexi Goranov wrote:
Hi Howy,

Even if I may sound somewhat redundant : Great article! Exclamation

After reading it I had few questions, so I decided to post them here.

The article mentions that the wooden core of the grip is "epoxied permanently into place". Does that allow changing the grip, is a customer later wants a different size/shape grip or if this one gets damaged for whatever reason?

Also, how were period grips stably fitted into place? Apparently hilt components of period swords were sometimes changed to reflect new fashions or due to damage, so how did they do that?

I am asking these questions more from the perspective of how swords were assembled centuries ago, and there is no criticism intended. I am sure the Albion crew does its best to make high-quality, period reproductions.

We have not head yet about the wire grip options on Albion swords Cool (hint, hint) Since few people asked (on another thread) I am raising the issue again.

Cheers,

Alexi


Hi Alexi!

Thank you for the kind words -- and the questions!

Yes, the grip cores can be removed, but it does entail totally destroying the grip in the process (I have removed a few that we were not happy with.) The best way is to take a nice sharp wood chisel and carefully separate the grip down the centerline of each side and then lever it off. It will most likely come off in a few pieces, but as long as one is careful to stay away from marring the guard and pommel, it should be fine.

We chose to use epoxy because it is also less prone to changes from humidty and temperature than the traditional "cutler's pitch" or natural glues -- it is one of the few compromises we make with historical methods to produce a better and more durable product.

Another option for refinishing the grip is to just remove the leather and cord (which, from experience, can also be done), leaving the core in place, and simply replace that with whatever style you like.

As to wire wrapped grips -- we are having a rather spirited in-house discussion on that topic, and once we are sure that we can deliver something that is historically correct and durable, we will let you all know first. But it may be a while off, and may not be available on all models.

Thanks again!

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
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Todd M. Sullivan




Location: Upstate New York
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PostPosted: Mon 19 Apr, 2004 6:47 am    Post subject: great article         Reply with quote

Excellent, I always wanted to visit Albion but this helps to show what the man behind the curtain does. Thanks Howy

Todd
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Randal Graham
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Location: Nova Scotia Canada
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jun, 2004 8:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

All the articles are awesome, best written of any of the type I've seen.
R.H.Graham
Swordsmith
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Howard Waddell
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jun, 2004 9:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Randal Graham wrote:
All the articles are awesome, best written of any of the type I've seen.


Thanks!

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
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William Goodwin




PostPosted: Wed 30 Jun, 2004 9:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great article Howy. Gives excellent insight to what actually goes in to making just one of Albion's fine wares.


William
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M. Taylor




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Jul, 2004 7:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Howy, I can't believe I was such a lazy sod and took so long to read this. That was excellent! It's really gratifying to see the care you guys take in making your swords and a good education for us. I work for a company that makes industrial/motion control systems, so I have a real fascination with manufacturing processes. Looking forward to the next installment. Keep up the good work!
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