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Howard Waddell
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 12:55 pm    Post subject: Introducing... The Oakeshott         Reply with quote

I have already added myself to the end of the line for this sword... Those folks with this sword already on order were lucky that everyone around here was able to restrain me from claiming the first one...

You can tell that this is a sword made for both mounted and foot combat - nice long reach but lightning fast. I like it...

Plus, the hollowgrinding is very visually appealing...



More here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...ott-xa.htm

and here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...photos.htm

(Better photos will follow when the weather improves...)

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
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Joel Chesser




Location: Oklahoma
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 12:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh my God, I think I'm in love!
..." The person who dosen't have a sword should sell his coat and buy one."

- Luke 22:36
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David Sutton




PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 1:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've been waiting a while to see this one and what a beauty she is! Cool
'Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all'

'To teach superstitions as truth is a most terrible thing'

Hypatia of Alexandria, c400AD
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Edward Hitchens




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 2:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is magnificant! I was very anxious to see how this one would turn out and I can see it was worth the wait.

Splendid! Absolutely splendid!

"The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest." Thomas Jefferson
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Dan P




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 2:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Does that blade flare a bit at the shoulders, right before the hilt, or is that just an optical illusion?
Either way, very nice lines!
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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 2:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, it does flare a bit at the shoulders - no illusion.

It's been a long time since I've been totally surprised when picking up a new blade. This guy feels sweet.
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Mikko Kuusirati




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 2:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That blade is pretty wicked. Far more complex than is apparent at first glance...
The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Anders Backlund




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 3:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Seems to be a nice enough piece of work, though I personally don't really like these long Crusade-era swords.
The sword is an ode to the strife of mankind.

"This doesn't look easy... but I bet it is!"
-Homer Simpson.
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Richard Gessman




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 3:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd have to agree with everyone else here, that sword is beautiful. And you're right, the hollow grind really adds to the aesthetic appeal of the blade.
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Paul Watson




Location: Upper Hutt, New Zealand
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 4:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Awesome sword, the close up photo of the point really shows the intricacy of the hollow ground blade transitioning in shape. I did not realise that Xa's were also hollow ground as well as being simple lenticular blades. I was under the mistaken impression that hollow grinding was a much later development. A very light sword for it's size, comparable to the XIX's.
I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, but that which it protects. (Faramir, The Two Towers)
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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 5:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hurray! I have been excited to see how this one would turn out. What a great looking sword. I may need to get this one....
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Addison C. de Lisle




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 6:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, the blade geometry on that one is beautiful. Now I can't wait for the Chevalier!
www.addisondelisle.com
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 8:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice as " usual ": Hard to find an Albion sword that doesn't surpass expectations from the design stage to execution. Big Grin Cool
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Jody A




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 8:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Addison C. de Lisle wrote:
Wow, the blade geometry on that one is beautiful. Now I can't wait for the Chevalier!


I agree Addison - that fuller is georgeous! And I too can't wait for the Chevalier ... I wonder if it will be the same blade ..??

QUI FALSITATE VIVIT, ANIMAM OCCIDIT. FALSUS IN ORE, CARET HONORE.
"Who lives in falsehood slays his soul, whose speech is false, his honour".
Inscription on type XII dated 1040-60 (Records, Oakeshott)
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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jan, 2008 9:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Awesome indeed. Any word on a custom scabbard for this one, like the Knight has?

M.

This space for rent or lease.
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Taylor Ellis




PostPosted: Thu 31 Jan, 2008 12:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For Howy or anyone else that has handled this sword, how does the changing blade geometry effect the sword handling? It looks like a fairly stiff sword, particularly for this era?

cheers fellas. Happy
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Jeremiah Swanger




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PostPosted: Thu 31 Jan, 2008 12:24 am    Post subject: Re: Introducing... The Oakeshott         Reply with quote

Howard Waddell wrote:
I have already added myself to the end of the line for this sword... Those folks with this sword already on order were lucky that everyone around here was able to restrain me from claiming the first one...

You can tell that this is a sword made for both mounted and foot combat - nice long reach but lightning fast. I like it...

Plus, the hollowgrinding is very visually appealing...

Best,
Howy


Wow, I really like how this one turned out! I honestly didn't know that hollow-ground blades existed before the flattened-diamond cross-sectioned swords of the 14th C. onward...

This is definitely a feature I would like to see in any future blades of the long-fullered types...

"Rhaegar fought nobly.
Rhaegar fought valiantly.
Rhaegar fought honorably.
And Rhaegar died."

- G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire
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Peter Cowan




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PostPosted: Thu 31 Jan, 2008 12:48 am    Post subject: Re: the oakeshott         Reply with quote

Well there goes buying groceries for the next two months. I knew this sword would catch my eye. After all look at it was modeled from, one of the most beautiful swords ever made( in my very humble opinion). Howy, you've done it again. This sword is definitely on my list. The hollow-grind looks stunning. Congratulations on another winner.
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Thu 31 Jan, 2008 6:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you all for comments and question.

To me this sword is important for several reasons.
It is one of those I have had my eyes on for longer than I have been making swords. To me it is one of the central ones for the appreciation of the medieval european sword, simply because it is so unique.
If I had to pick ten or five swords among surviving medieval swords, this one would be among them, I think.

Last year I was generously given permission to document the original at the Wallace collection.
By this time I had already submitted the design for the blade to Albion and received the first prototype blade. It was a small hang-up with the CNC machine (producing a minute kink in the outline) that took long in correcting that delayed the completion of the sword. Otherwise this sword would have reached the market more than a year ago.

At this occasion I was in London to participate in the Arms and Armour conference organized by the Armour Research Society at the Wallace collection. For my talk I brought along to blades to demonstrate the effects in dynamic balance when mounting hilts of various weights. The blades were of the Munich long sword and the A 459 (Xa.1 in Oakeshotts "Records").
I was very curious to see how close I got to the original with my prototype. My design was based on memories and notes taken during several visits the the Wallace Collection over the years and what general information I had dug up from the internet. These observations and data were then the basis for applying principles of a design structure following the golden section as seen in other swords with some basic likeness to this one. Perhaps you can visualize a grid of sorts where proportions relate to each other according to the Golden Section: a method that I have found very useful in analyzing and reconstructing or designing swords.
With the original in hand I could document those important dynamic properties (such as placing of forward and aft pivot points as well as the vibration nodes) that until then had not been noted from this sword.

The Albion blade is within a millimeter from the museum sword in a few places and otherwise the difference is within fractions of a millimeter.
When the Albion blade is balanced to provide the same placing of pivot points, nodes and balance point as the museum sword has, the results is a weapon some 15 grams lighter than the original.
This weight difference and the fact that the fullers are not flat in the bottom (as on the museum sword) but shaped in a true radius are the two major reasons it does not qualify to be a Museum Line sword.
Difference between the two swords is very small. It is well within the difference you would find between two swords made to the same pattern and design by the same maker fulfilling an order in the 13th C.

The cross section is unusual. I know of no other sword that has a similar blade. I am not convinced, like Oakeshott, that it could be dated as early as the 11th. Rather I would think it belongs to 13th or early 14th C. But who can really tell?

It is an enigmatic sword and would probably benefit from further study. Some aspects really made me curious to know more of its history in past and more recent times.

The hollow grinding is unique for a sword of this type and from this period. It allows a combination of a relatively thick spine, healthy width and finely defined edges. The edges are not so thin that they are fragile, you have just removed "dead meat" in the area between the actual cutting sharpness and the spine.

To describe its heft and character is difficult as you would have to compare it to swords you know. It is fairly stiff given its weight and length, but it is a flexible and dynamic blade. It is lively in the hand and invites nimble and quick moves. The test cutting I made with the prototype blade proved that it has an impressive bite. I think it is one of the most aggressive single hand cutters Ive developed for the NG line. It is easy to accelerate and control and has a pleasing presence. This is a sword whose harmonic proportions are a visual expression of its character in handling. It shares some personality with a beautiful musical instrument.

I have learned much in the study of this sword and feel grateful to its original maker/makers. Any qualities you can find in the NG line Oakeshott sword, is a tribute to these masters of a past age.


Last edited by Peter Johnsson on Thu 31 Jan, 2008 7:15 am; edited 1 time in total
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Thu 31 Jan, 2008 7:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jody A wrote:
Addison C. de Lisle wrote:
Wow, the blade geometry on that one is beautiful. Now I can't wait for the Chevalier!


I agree Addison - that fuller is georgeous! And I too can't wait for the Chevalier ... I wonder if it will be the same blade ..??


The sole reason to design the Chevalier, was that the great blade of A459 was available. It seemed such a shame not to use it for other sword designs of the same general time period.
The inspiration for the Chevalier is of course the famous miniature of the kneeling knight in the Westminster Psalter from around 1250.

As I now have the dynamical data of the A 459, another style of hilt can be developed that fits the time period and provides the same authentic handling properties as the "Oakeshott" in the NG line. It comes down to a preference in aesthetics, what sword you feel most attracted to.
I am presently working on the waxes for the Chevalier. The pommel is finished, but I might rework the guard. Perhaps it will end up looking less than I suggested in the concept drawing and more like more like the guard in the miniature in the Westminster Psalter. We shall see...



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KneelingKnight202.jpg

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