Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Turnshoes.... Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Nicolai Overgaard




Location: Denmark
Joined: 09 Mar 2006

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan, 2008 7:15 am    Post subject: Turnshoes....         Reply with quote

Greetings...
I am looking for a way to make the so called 'turnshoes' and I did find a website that showed how to make these or at least had a pattern. now I can't seem to find that website again,so if anyone knows of the website or knows of a pattern I would appreciate the help.

Thanks,

Nicolai
View user's profile Send private message
Johan S. Moen




Location: Kristiansand, Norway
Joined: 26 Jan 2004

Posts: 259

PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan, 2008 8:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, you could do worse than Footwear in the Middle Ages by Marc Carlson:

http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOME.HTM

Happy

Johan Schubert Moen
View user's profile Send private message
Al Muckart




Location: NZ
Joined: 27 Dec 2005

Posts: 309

PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan, 2008 11:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Marc Carlson's page linked in a previous reply is the best place on the 'net to start.

I've got a blog where I write about shoemaking:
http://wherearetheelves.blogspot.com

There is a yahoo mailing list for medieval shoemakers
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalshoemaking/

I strongly advise getting hold of a copy of Shoes and Pattens. It's 20 year old research but it is still the standard reference for people interested in medieval shoes.

Another of the standard references for people interested in medieval shoes is Olaf Goubitz's Stepping Through Time which isn't specifically about medieval shoes but has a lot of information on them nonetheless.

If you have specific questions about shoes feel free to ask and I'll do my best to answer.

--
Al.
http://wherearetheelves.net
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan, 2008 2:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Al Muckart wrote:
Marc Carlson's page linked in a previous reply is the best place on the 'net to start.

I've got a blog where I write about shoemaking:
http://wherearetheelves.blogspot.com

There is a yahoo mailing list for medieval shoemakers
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalshoemaking/

I strongly advise getting hold of a copy of Shoes and Pattens. It's 20 year old research but it is still the standard reference for people interested in medieval shoes.

Another of the standard references for people interested in medieval shoes is Olaf Goubitz's Stepping Through Time which isn't specifically about medieval shoes but has a lot of information on them nonetheless.

If you have specific questions about shoes feel free to ask and I'll do my best to answer.


I'm looking for the pattern of a Xv century soldier's boot.


have you got one by chance?
thank you
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Smith





Joined: 31 Mar 2004

Posts: 93

PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan, 2008 7:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For under $20, the best you can do is to look at Talbot's Fine Accesories. Each of his supplements or main manuals is only $5 for PDF, or $6 on CD. There are about 3 different base manuals, and then broken down by century.
View user's profile Send private message
Al Muckart




Location: NZ
Joined: 27 Dec 2005

Posts: 309

PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan, 2008 10:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Bruno,

Bruno Giordan wrote:
Al Muckart wrote:

If you have specific questions about shoes feel free to ask and I'll do my best to answer.


I'm looking for the pattern of a Xv century soldier's boot.


have you got one by chance?
thank you


When and where in the 15th century? There was a lot of change in footwear over the course of the 15th century, both in style and construction technique. A 1401 english boot is going to be very different from a 1497 german one.

I don't have specific patterns, I make a new pattern for each foot and style of shoe I make and I don't have any machine-readable example patterns, though that is on my (long) list of things to do.

If you want the shoe to fit well the best bet is to make a pattern on your own foot once you understand what style of shoe you want.

If you want something that will cover your ankles the easiest sort of thing to make is a lace up ankle shoe. There are some pictures of one I made a few years ago at: http://wherearetheelves.blogspot.com/2007/12/...-shoe.html

The text says late 14th century, but that style is also good into the 15th century. It can be made a bit taller and with 3 laces as well. The same basic style can be made with buckles instead of laces too.

Really the best thing to do is to find a picture of the sort of shoes you want and find someone who can help you work out the cutting pattern and the correct sole shape. Once you've done that it isn't too hard to get a pattern with the old masking-tape and plastic bag method. Make a sole template in thick stiff cardboard and tape it to your foot. Stick your foot in a plastic bag and wrap it in masking tape (not too tight). Don't used duct tape -- it stretches.

Draw the shoe you want on the masking tape and carefully cut it off your foot. Slit in appropriate places to lay it flat and turn it into a pattern.

--
Al.
http://wherearetheelves.net
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Arne Focke
Industry Professional



Location: near Munich, Germany
Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Reading list: 34 books

Posts: 204

PostPosted: Sun 27 Jan, 2008 7:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would recommend "Stepping through time" by Olaf Goubitz. It is hard to get a copy these days, but it is worth the effort. Lots of patterns and examples for shoes from all kinds of periods.
So schön und inhaltsreich der Beruf eines Archäologen ist, so hart ist auch seine Arbeit, die keinen Achtstundentag kennt! (Wolfgang Kimmig in: Die Heuneburg an der oberen Donau, Stuttgart 1983)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Sun 27 Jan, 2008 9:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Al Muckart wrote:
Hi Bruno,

Bruno Giordan wrote:
Al Muckart wrote:

If you have specific questions about shoes feel free to ask and I'll do my best to answer.


I'm looking for the pattern of a Xv century soldier's boot.


have you got one by chance?
thank you


When and where in the 15th century? There was a lot of change in footwear over the course of the 15th century, both in style and construction technique. A 1401 english boot is going to be very different from a 1497 german one.

I don't have specific patterns, I make a new pattern for each foot and style of shoe I make and I don't have any machine-readable example patterns, though that is on my (long) list of things to do.

If you want the shoe to fit well the best bet is to make a pattern on your own foot once you understand what style of shoe you want.

If you want something that will cover your ankles the easiest sort of thing to make is a lace up ankle shoe. There are some pictures of one I made a few years ago at: http://wherearetheelves.blogspot.com/2007/12/...-shoe.html

The text says late 14th century, but that style is also good into the 15th century. It can be made a bit taller and with 3 laces as well. The same basic style can be made with buckles instead of laces too.

Really the best thing to do is to find a picture of the sort of shoes you want and find someone who can help you work out the cutting pattern and the correct sole shape. Once you've done that it isn't too hard to get a pattern with the old masking-tape and plastic bag method. Make a sole template in thick stiff cardboard and tape it to your foot. Stick your foot in a plastic bag and wrap it in masking tape (not too tight). Don't used duct tape -- it stretches.

Draw the shoe you want on the masking tape and carefully cut it off your foot. Slit in appropriate places to lay it flat and turn it into a pattern.


thank you.

My inspiration ar from tuscan - northern italian artworks of tha second half of the XV centuy, the low boots worn by hunters and soldiers.

Pls see this Botticelli

http://galleries.fototagger.com/link.php?acti...amp;sort=0

I'm planning a late XV century northern italian infantry persona.
View user's profile Send private message
Al Muckart




Location: NZ
Joined: 27 Dec 2005

Posts: 309

PostPosted: Sun 27 Jan, 2008 2:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Arne Focke wrote:
I would recommend "Stepping through time" by Olaf Goubitz. It is hard to get a copy these days, but it is worth the effort. Lots of patterns and examples for shoes from all kinds of periods.


This fantastic book recently became much easier (and cheaper!) to get. Oxbow Books/David Brown Book Company - my favourite online bookseller - have reprinted it in softback.

http://www.oxbowbooks.com/bookinfo.cfm/ID/32567

I heartily recommend it to anyone interested in period footwear.

--
Al.
http://wherearetheelves.net
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Al Muckart




Location: NZ
Joined: 27 Dec 2005

Posts: 309

PostPosted: Sun 27 Jan, 2008 2:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Turnshoes....         Reply with quote

Hi Nicolai,

Nicolai Overgaard wrote:
Greetings...
I am looking for a way to make the so called 'turnshoes' and I did find a website that showed how to make these or at least had a pattern. now I can't seem to find that website again,so if anyone knows of the website or knows of a pattern I would appreciate the help.


Has any of this discussion so far helped? Are there any more questions you have?

--
Al.
http://wherearetheelves.net
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Nicolai Overgaard




Location: Denmark
Joined: 09 Mar 2006

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Sun 27 Jan, 2008 4:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

All this great information has been and is a great help Happy thanks all of you. I certainly got an answer for my question.
Thanks a million.

Nicolai
View user's profile Send private message
James Barker




Location: Ashburn VA
Joined: 20 Apr 2005

Posts: 365

PostPosted: Mon 28 Jan, 2008 6:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Al Muckart wrote:
Arne Focke wrote:
I would recommend "Stepping through time" by Olaf Goubitz. It is hard to get a copy these days, but it is worth the effort. Lots of patterns and examples for shoes from all kinds of periods.


This fantastic book recently became much easier (and cheaper!) to get. Oxbow Books/David Brown Book Company - my favourite online bookseller - have reprinted it in softback.

http://www.oxbowbooks.com/bookinfo.cfm/ID/32567

I heartily recommend it to anyone interested in period footwear.


I have to Third this recommendation; I find it more complete than Shoes and Pattens. I have had to use others copies for a while but now with the paperback I can get a copy for myself.

I did an early 15th century boot based of the one in Shoes and Pattens; I have images here: http://www.historiclife.com/HistoricalClothing/15th.htm


Al nice blog; I am going to keep that one booked marked for inspiration.

James Barker
Historic Life http://www.historiclife.com/index.html
Archer in La Belle Compagnie http://www.labelle.org/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Turnshoes....
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum