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Nick L.





Joined: 13 Jan 2008

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2008 7:57 am    Post subject: Sword-making process in relation to the maker...         Reply with quote

I'm pretty new here...and believe it or not, I don't own a sword yet. I signed up to enhance my knowledge of weaponry and European Martial Arts. I do know a bit about metal working however, as my best friend and I have an Armoring shop just south of Syracuse, NY (McGraw. I actualy live in Cortland).

I'm fascinated with sword and blade smithing. It would love to learn to make quality, battle worth blades. I know abit about heat treating and have a good hammer hand and eye....but, that's about where I give up. Just don't have enough experience or just visual experience of the processes. If anyone could point me in the right direction on how to gain such knowledge...whether through books or more hands on learning, I would be much appreciative.

All that said, I've looked throughout the internet at sword makers, and having such little knowledge, I find that i'm unsure of who and what to look for when inquiring for a fine blade. I would eventualy like to make my own and know that with some direction I'm more than capable. However, both for reference and personal use, I would enjoy buying some for myself.

Any help and input would surely be appreciated. Thank you.


Last edited by Nick L. on Tue 15 Jan, 2008 10:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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Carlo Arellano





Joined: 21 Oct 2007

Posts: 52

PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2008 8:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

does your armor shop have a website?
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Nick L.





Joined: 13 Jan 2008

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2008 8:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's currently under construction, though should be up and running shortly. But, we are Nikkitta Armories. I'll dig up some pix to post soon.
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Craig Johnson
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Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2008 8:58 am    Post subject: Great place to start.         Reply with quote

Hi Nick

Here is a great place to start.

http://www.dfoggknives.com/craftof.htm

Best
Craig
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Justin King
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Location: flagstaff,arizona
Joined: 12 Apr 2004
Reading list: 20 books

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PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2008 6:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Welcome Nick,
There are a number of good online resources for bladesmithing, and some good literature. Jim Hrisoulas's first book "The Complete Bladesmith" is geared toward the beginner and provides enough info to get going.
There are a few forums on SwordForumInternational for bladesmithing and metallurgy, most beginner's questions have been asked before so using searches will often get more info than asking questions that everyone has answered to death. Browsing old threads and stickies will turn up some good references.
My advice is to start small, make knives and smaller items first and get a feel for the different processes. I heartily recommend that you use new material of known alloy/content once you start making blades to eliminate variables, and do lots of abuse testing, bar-breaking, etc. to see what you are producing, heat treating methods and the quality of the results thereof vary a great deal, and must be suited to both the steel and application of the finished product.
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Anders Backlund




Location: Sweden
Joined: 24 Oct 2007

Posts: 629

PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2008 12:02 am    Post subject: Re: Sword-making process in relation to the maker...         Reply with quote

Nick L. wrote:
I'm pretty new here...and believe it or not, I don't own a sword yet. I signed up to enhance my knowledge of weaponry and European Martial Arts. I do know a bit about metal working however, as my best friend and I have an Armoring shop just south of Syracuse, NY (McGraw. I actualy live in Cortland).

I'm fascinated with sword and blade smithing. It would love to learn to make quality, battle worth blades. I know abit about heat treating and have a good hammer hand and eye....but, that's about where I give up. Just don't have enough experience or just visual experience of the processes. If anyone could point me in the right direction on how to gain such knowledge...whether through books or more hands on learning, I would be much appreciative.

All that said, I've looked throughout the internet at sword makers, and having such little knowledge, I find that i'm unsure of who and what to look for when inquiring for a fine blade. I would eventualy like to make my own and know that with some direction I'm more than capable. However, both for reference and personal use, I would enjoy buying some for myself.

Any help and input would surely be appreciated. Thank you.


Hello, Nick. Nice to hear from another sword enthusiast.

I've had some blacksmithing experience and have attempted to make swords. Unfortunately, my lack of a decent smithy and good equipment is currently hampering my progress.

My main advice, however, would be to get a good understanding of what a sword is and how it works. Things like blade symmetry, hilt construction and the ergonomy of the grips are easy things to overlook for a beginner, and I've made those mistakes myself.

In short, don't think of swords as simply "big knives." (Even though skill at knife making is a good place to start when getting into the art of forging swords.)

The sword is an ode to the strife of mankind.

"This doesn't look easy... but I bet it is!"
-Homer Simpson.
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Bob Burns




Location: South Indianapolis IN
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PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2008 7:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Nick and welcome to myArmoury, which was a very intelligent choice to join. Oh to learn swordsmithing! Well, if you are wealthy you could do what I would want to do, and that would be to go to Europe and pay either Peter Johnsson or Patrick Barta to teach you how to learn to be a swordsmith "if" you have the raw talent that is required to have any hope of being a proficient swordsmith! Laughing Out Loud OK, so it's a "Pipe Dream", I thought I would welcome you to the forum with some humor to give you some mileage for laughing.

Great to see you here!

Bob
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Bruce Tordoff
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Joined: 13 Aug 2007

Posts: 120

PostPosted: Sat 19 Jan, 2008 7:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Nick, as a student of swordmaking and a Viking re-enactor (in the UK) may I suggest that you perhaps find some group in your area that engages in some form of sword combat, Either with a view to 'having a go' yourself or (if your lifestyle does not allow you the time) at least observing their use and being able to discuss the subject with the people who can wield them effectively, This, I find, is a really useful tool in my quest to make quality swords. By understanding the processes and skills involved in using a sword, it gives the 'bladesmith' a much more intimate understanding of what is required in the manufacturing of a sword and it puts into context the processes involved . ie, reasons for different hardening/tempering dependent on the type of sword being made and its intended use. No book or article can come close to describing the satisfying 'crunch' when your blade smashes through your enemies shield or the amusingly hollywood "Schwing" sound you get when parrying an opponents blow.
Here are some links to sword makers of many 'periods' and styles for varying uses.

http://www.templ.net/english/ this is Patrick Barta (Czech Republic), my pitiful words cannot describe this mans work!
Jealous? Who, me? ( yeah , bet your ass i am)!
http://heronarmoury.co.uk Tim Noyes, very nice selection of swords from many periods.

http://www.paul-binns-swords.co.uk does other periods, but mainly viking, saxon, norman etc.

http://www.albion-swords.com/ of course Peter Johssons excellent work.

http://www.deltin.net/home.htm Itallian maker of fine swords,
There are many more manufacturers of swords of all periods ( and all qualities) too numerous to mention, but the above are a decent cross section of what is being made for the collector, re-enactor, museums etc.
But the Jim Hrsoulas book ( as mentioned earlier in the thread) 'the complete bladesmith is a comprehensive starting point,
Containing all the essential stuff, like smithing techniques, heat treatment, metallurgy, history, and much more.
I hope this is of some use to you and good luck.
Bruce
Here are a couple of weapons that I made, ( I'm still learning) A small viking seax (knife) and a Viking sword, (blade is EN45 spring steel) blunt for combat.
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Bruce Tordoff
Industry Professional




Joined: 13 Aug 2007

Posts: 120

PostPosted: Sat 19 Jan, 2008 8:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here are pics, didn't attach on last post.
Cheers, Bruce



 Attachment: 22.2 KB
knife.jpg
Viking Seax (Knife)

 Attachment: 43.59 KB
swordwscabbard.jpg


 Attachment: 55.6 KB
swordclose.jpg

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