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G Ezell
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Location: North Alabama
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PostPosted: Fri 28 Dec, 2007 9:14 pm    Post subject: yet another seax question         Reply with quote

Concerning fullers...
I've seen a few seaxes, primarally of the broken-back style, that have fullers that seem to run right off the back of the blade instead of ending in a more conventional way. Is this correct, or am I seeing things? They look good, regardless.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Location: Netherlands
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Dec, 2007 5:20 am    Post subject: Re: yet another seax question         Reply with quote

G Ezell wrote:
Concerning fullers...
I've seen a few seaxes, primarally of the broken-back style, that have fullers that seem to run right off the back of the blade instead of ending in a more conventional way. Is this correct, or am I seeing things? They look good, regardless.

From what I can tell, they end just before the edge. I don't have any clear images of this, except for the Beagnoth seax:



As you can see in this example, it runs right against the edge, but doesn't follow through.
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Peter Bosman




Location: Andalucia
Joined: 22 May 2006

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PostPosted: Sat 29 Dec, 2007 6:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That looks réaly craftily done indeed.
At first glace you might think the blade was produced with the fuller and then ´cut´ to produce the drop, but you can just see the fuller stops, or gradually starts, befóre the back!

peter
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G Ezell
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Location: North Alabama
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Dec, 2007 9:43 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you for the replies. From the close up, it does appear to not quite make it to the back. Very interesting.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Location: Netherlands
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Dec, 2007 12:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Now a question from me Happy The sax depicted on the gravestone of Niederdollendorf appears to have a hole near the end of the hilt: http://1501bc.com/files/06210012.jpg

Any ideas what that hole was for?

And does anyone have a more detailed images of this one: http://1501bc.com/files/Repton_seax.jpg, or perhaps know of any other depictions with saxes?
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G Ezell
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Location: North Alabama
Joined: 22 Dec 2003

Posts: 232

PostPosted: Sat 29 Dec, 2007 8:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeroen Zuiderwijk wrote:
Now a question from me Happy The sax depicted on the gravestone of Niederdollendorf appears to have a hole near the end of the hilt: http://1501bc.com/files/06210012.jpg

Any ideas what that hole was for?



Hmmmmm...
This is a guess and only a guess. In your collection of images I recall seeing several assorted handle fragments, I don't have it with me on this pc to confirm the locality of the fragments but I think they were Swedish... There was more than one pictured that had metal rings mounted on the end of the handle. The hole in the gravestone sax is not at all the same thing, but may very well serve the same purpose; a place to attach a laynard cord that would be wrapped around the wrist of the user in order to make sure the knife will not get away. This is pretty common on modern utility knives, and a nice feature when you're hanging 7 floors above your co-workers (been there), or when working over water.

Considering how many blades have been found in rivers or bogs, they seem to have needed them... Wink

For that matter, those two little German knives with bone handles also have holes at the end of the handle that could be used as such.
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Peter Bosman




Location: Andalucia
Joined: 22 May 2006

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PostPosted: Sun 30 Dec, 2007 1:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Long blades were a privilege for a small class. These same men also had the right to ride a horse. It is common sense to attach a blade to sómething when intenting to fight on horseback

G Ezell wrote:

Considering how many blades have been found in rivers or bogs, they seem to have needed them... Wink


Should that not be the other way around?
As most (if not all) seem to have been deposited there on purpose ..... this may ´proove´ they díd use them to prevent accidental loss Laughing Out Loud

peter
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Location: Netherlands
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PostPosted: Sun 30 Dec, 2007 11:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

G Ezell wrote:
Hmmmmm...
This is a guess and only a guess. In your collection of images I recall seeing several assorted handle fragments, I don't have it with me on this pc to confirm the locality of the fragments but I think they were Swedish... There was more than one pictured that had metal rings mounted on the end of the handle. The hole in the gravestone sax is not at all the same thing, but may very well serve the same purpose; a place to attach a laynard cord that would be wrapped around the wrist of the user in order to make sure the knife will not get away. This is pretty common on modern utility knives, and a nice feature when you're hanging 7 floors above your co-workers (been there), or when working over water.

Considering how many blades have been found in rivers or bogs, they seem to have needed them... Wink

For that matter, those two little German knives with bone handles also have holes at the end of the handle that could be used as such.
I've considered that too. Another function could be to bind them to the scabbards, just like with the ring hilted swords. The odd thing I find is that if it's for a cord, why is there no cord pictured?
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