Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Plot for a sword age novel - your favourite fantasy Reply to topic
This is a standard topic Go to page 1, 2  Next 
Author Message
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Tue 23 Oct, 2007 2:24 pm    Post subject: Plot for a sword age novel - your favourite fantasy         Reply with quote

I was asking myself what would be the most popular setting for a novel based on the age of the sword.

Wild fantasies welcome.

I would set it in the Condottieri age, and my favorite character would be a non-noble young boy that arises to the status of Condottiero.

That's also the Renaissance, my favorite artistic period.

Despite current tastes i would strictly adhere to history, there is enough of wonders in historical truth that one doesn't really need to step into the fantasy realm.



.
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,900

PostPosted: Wed 24 Oct, 2007 8:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Battle of Towton, with a fictionalized (and doomed) lead character. It's such a compelling story and would look incredible onscreen, with the snow and armour and bowmen and the catastrophic rout, etc. It even has that great strategic moment when a commander knew he had the advantage of wind and had his archers fire one volley of arrows in a successful attempt to bait the enemy archers into ineffectualy firing all of their own arrows. I can just see all those arrows falling through the snow harmlessly into the ground between the opposing lines.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Michael Ekelmann




Location: Seattle Metro Area, USA
Joined: 01 Nov 2006
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 92

PostPosted: Wed 24 Oct, 2007 11:46 am    Post subject: The Victual Brothers in the Baltic         Reply with quote

"God's friends and the whole world's enemies"

I would do it like the Godfather.

Victual Brothers
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
•The Victual Brothers resp. Vitalians or Vitalian Brotherhood were a companionship of privateers who later turned to piracy. They were hired in 1392 by the Dukes of Mecklenburg to fight against Denmark, because the Danish Queen Margaret I had imprisoned Albrecht of Mecklenburg and his son to subdue the kingdom of Sweden. Albrecht was King of Sweden since 1364 and Duke of Mecklenburg since 1383.


[edit] Guild of the Victual Brothers
When Queen Margaret and Albrecht of Mecklenburg were battling for Scandinavian supremacy and Margaret's forces had besieged Stockholm, privateers named the Victual Brothers engaged in sea-war-activities and shipped food to keep the city supplied. The name Victual Brothers is derived from the Latin word "victualia" — meaning provisions — and refers to their first mission, which was to bring needed supplies to the besieged town of Stockholm.

The Victual Brothers were organised as a brotherhood or guild and attracted men from all over Europe. Their main naval enemy in 1392 was the powerful Hanseatic town of Lübeck, which supported Denmark in the war. Apart from Lübeck, the Hanseatic League at first encouraged the Victual Brothers. Most of the Hanseatic towns had no desire to see Denmark victorious, since its location was strategic for the control of the seaways.

For several years from 1392 on, the Victual Brothers were a strong power to be reckoned with in the Baltic Sea. They had safe harbours in the cities of Rostock, Ribnitz, Wismar and Stralsund. However, they soon went their own way, more or less turning to open piracy and coast robbery. In 1393 they sacked the town of Bergen for the first time and in 1394 they conquered Malmö. They also plundered Åbo, Vyborg, Faxeholm, Styresholm and Korsholm and occupied parts of Frisia and Schleswig.

At the climax of their power, the Victual Brothers occupied Gotland in 1394 and set up their headquarters in Visby. Baltic Sea maritime trade virtually collapsed, and the herring industry suffered from their depredations. Queen Margaret even turned to King Richard II seeking to charter English ships to combat the pirates.

From 1395 on Queen Margaret gained the upper hand politically. She united Denmark, Sweden and Norway and formed the Kalmar Union. Thus, the Hanseatic League was forced to cooperate with her, foreshadowing its eventual decline.

At the same time, the Victual Brothers impartially raided everyone's shipping. Their famous battle cry was "God's friends and the whole world's enemies". Queen Margaret and King Albert of Sweden conceded Gotland to the allied Teutonic Order as a pledge (similar to a fiefdom). An invasion army under Konrad von Jungingen, the Grand Master of the Order, conquered the island in 1398, destroying Visby and driving the Victual Brothers out of Gotland.


[edit] Likedeelers, the successors of the Victual Brothers

The Brindled CowAfter the Victual Brothers' defeat and expulsion from Gotland in 1398, the Hanseatic League tried repeatedly to end the anarchy in the Baltic Sea, but with little luck. Many Victual Brothers still remained at sea. When they lost their influence in the Gulf of Bothnia, the Gulf of Finland and Gotland, they operated from the Schlei, the mouth of the river Ems and from other locations in Friesland. The successors of the Victual Brothers gave themselves the name Likedeelers, which means to share in equal parts, which they even did with the poor population along the coast. They expanded their field of activities into the North Sea and along the Atlantic coastline, raiding Brabant, France and as striking as far south as Spain.

Their most famous leader was Captain Störtebeker. He got his name allegedly because he could swallow four litres of beer without taking the beaker from his mouth. However, it might simply be a family name from Wismar. The Low German word "Störtebeker" means in English: "Down the drink in the beaker". In 1401 the Hamburg warship Brindled Cow, leading a small fleet under Commander Simon of Utrecht, caught up with Störtebeker's forces near Heligoland. After three days of running battle, Störtebeker and his crew were finally overpowered and trapped by means of a trick.

Yet this was not the end of piracy and coastal raiding by the Likedeelers. In 1429, 28 years after the execution of Störtebeker, other members of the Victual Brothers attacked and plundered the city of Bergen in Norway, eventually burning it to the ground. Until about 1440, maritime trade in both the North Sea and the Baltic Sea was seriously in danger of attack by the Likedeelers.
View user's profile Send private message
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Wed 24 Oct, 2007 12:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
The Battle of Towton, with a fictionalized (and doomed) lead character. It's such a compelling story and would look incredible onscreen, with the snow and armour and bowmen and the catastrophic rout, etc. It even has that great strategic moment when a commander knew he had the advantage of wind and had his archers fire one volley of arrows in a successful attempt to bait the enemy archers into ineffectualy firing all of their own arrows. I can just see all those arrows falling through the snow harmlessly into the ground between the opposing lines.


I understand

http://www.brad.ac.uk/acad/archsci/depart/resgrp/towton/

why a doomed character?

Please elaborate, it is an interesting lead.
View user's profile Send private message
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Wed 24 Oct, 2007 12:34 pm    Post subject: Re: The Victual Brothers in the Baltic         Reply with quote

Michael Ekelmann wrote:
"God's friends and the whole world's enemies"

I would do it like the Godfather.

Victual Brothers
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
•The Victual Brothers resp. Vitalians or Vitalian Brotherhood were a companionship of privateers who later turned to piracy. They were hired in 1392 by the Dukes of Mecklenburg to fight against Denmark, because the Danish Queen Margaret I had imprisoned Albrecht of Mecklenburg and his son to subdue the kingdom of Sweden. Albrecht was King of Sweden since 1364 and Duke of Mecklenburg since 1383.


[edit] Guild of the Victual Brothers
When Queen Margaret and Albrecht of Mecklenburg were battling for Scandinavian supremacy and Margaret's forces had besieged Stockholm, privateers named the Victual Brothers engaged in sea-war-activities and shipped food to keep the city supplied. The name Victual Brothers is derived from the Latin word "victualia" — meaning provisions — and refers to their first mission, which was to bring needed supplies to the besieged town of Stockholm.

The Victual Brothers were organised as a brotherhood or guild and attracted men from all over Europe. Their main naval enemy in 1392 was the powerful Hanseatic town of Lübeck, which supported Denmark in the war. Apart from Lübeck, the Hanseatic League at first encouraged the Victual Brothers. Most of the Hanseatic towns had no desire to see Denmark victorious, since its location was strategic for the control of the seaways.

For several years from 1392 on, the Victual Brothers were a strong power to be reckoned with in the Baltic Sea. They had safe harbours in the cities of Rostock, Ribnitz, Wismar and Stralsund. However, they soon went their own way, more or less turning to open piracy and coast robbery. In 1393 they sacked the town of Bergen for the first time and in 1394 they conquered Malmö. They also plundered Åbo, Vyborg, Faxeholm, Styresholm and Korsholm and occupied parts of Frisia and Schleswig.

At the climax of their power, the Victual Brothers occupied Gotland in 1394 and set up their headquarters in Visby. Baltic Sea maritime trade virtually collapsed, and the herring industry suffered from their depredations. Queen Margaret even turned to King Richard II seeking to charter English ships to combat the pirates.

From 1395 on Queen Margaret gained the upper hand politically. She united Denmark, Sweden and Norway and formed the Kalmar Union. Thus, the Hanseatic League was forced to cooperate with her, foreshadowing its eventual decline.

At the same time, the Victual Brothers impartially raided everyone's shipping. Their famous battle cry was "God's friends and the whole world's enemies". Queen Margaret and King Albert of Sweden conceded Gotland to the allied Teutonic Order as a pledge (similar to a fiefdom). An invasion army under Konrad von Jungingen, the Grand Master of the Order, conquered the island in 1398, destroying Visby and driving the Victual Brothers out of Gotland.


[edit] Likedeelers, the successors of the Victual Brothers

The Brindled CowAfter the Victual Brothers' defeat and expulsion from Gotland in 1398, the Hanseatic League tried repeatedly to end the anarchy in the Baltic Sea, but with little luck. Many Victual Brothers still remained at sea. When they lost their influence in the Gulf of Bothnia, the Gulf of Finland and Gotland, they operated from the Schlei, the mouth of the river Ems and from other locations in Friesland. The successors of the Victual Brothers gave themselves the name Likedeelers, which means to share in equal parts, which they even did with the poor population along the coast. They expanded their field of activities into the North Sea and along the Atlantic coastline, raiding Brabant, France and as striking as far south as Spain.

Their most famous leader was Captain Störtebeker. He got his name allegedly because he could swallow four litres of beer without taking the beaker from his mouth. However, it might simply be a family name from Wismar. The Low German word "Störtebeker" means in English: "Down the drink in the beaker". In 1401 the Hamburg warship Brindled Cow, leading a small fleet under Commander Simon of Utrecht, caught up with Störtebeker's forces near Heligoland. After three days of running battle, Störtebeker and his crew were finally overpowered and trapped by means of a trick.

Yet this was not the end of piracy and coastal raiding by the Likedeelers. In 1429, 28 years after the execution of Störtebeker, other members of the Victual Brothers attacked and plundered the city of Bergen in Norway, eventually burning it to the ground. Until about 1440, maritime trade in both the North Sea and the Baltic Sea was seriously in danger of attack by the Likedeelers.


What an interesting piece of history i wouldn't even know of !
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,900

PostPosted: Wed 24 Oct, 2007 12:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bruno Giordan wrote:


why a doomed character?

Please elaborate, it is an interesting lead.


Well, the Lost Cause is always compelling, for one thing. Among American Civil War reenactors, Confederate troops outnumber Federal. There are now groups reenacting Waffen SS!

There's just a certain romance about characters you know are doomed, I think. The passage of time makes them the underdog, no matter how unjust their cause may have been. Following such a character emphasizes the inevitable waste of war, especially a civil war such as the War of the Roses. Gaining sympathy for him, then killing him off with a Yorkist arrow to the throat of poleaxe through his head would make a point about war more powerfully than would presenting only the victor's perspective. The audience feels the loss. Or maybe you could tell the story of a family divided between the opposing sides and follow two characters or families. That could be even more powerful, because then everybodyloses.

A recent example: Critics found Clint Eastwood's Letters From Iwo Jima to be a better film than his Flag Of Our Fathers. I think that is partially explained by his telling the story of the doomed. Thinking of Eastwood...His Civil War film, The Beguiled wouldn't be nearly as memorable (to those few of us who remember it) if the main character had survived. Sorry for the spoiler Big Grin If only he'd left Marcia Brady's turtle alone....

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 3
Posts: 1,532

PostPosted: Wed 24 Oct, 2007 4:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would consider the life and accomplishments of Germany's King Frederick I "Barbarossa." Beset from birth by contest over royal lineage and regional rebellion (eventually having to fight against his uncle the archbishop Conrad who had convinced him to become king in the first place)/ power struggles, religious freedom/policy, and constant battle.

He rebuilt central control and government of much of the "Holy Roman Empire", instituted significant policies giving rights of freedom to cities, regional republics, and individuals, and hosted one of the greatest celebrations of pre-modern Olympics/ World's Fair sized events in triumph at the Mainzer Dam cathedral for which he instigated major upgrades. He was so beloved by the common people that it was said farmers quit working in their fields and ran to assist him when in grave peril during an ambush. Several medieval historians comment in their texts that the common populace confused him with Charlemagne and believed in myths of "the old man sleeping under the mountains" expecting his return for several centuries afterwards. There are few real world documented characters that appear to be a genuine blend of King Aurthur and Charlemagne, but this guy does appear to have been so.

Again, he was tragically killed in drowning during a river crossing related to holy crusade. His sons were not really the same type of inspirational leaders. He did not have the most glamorous ending, but a very long a fully lived life that was immortalized by the people he served well.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
View user's profile Send private message
Bram Verbeek





Joined: 27 Mar 2007

Posts: 217

PostPosted: Thu 25 Oct, 2007 3:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Barbarossa is a very interesting figure. I own the 19th century "Acta Imperii Selecta" and the recordings of Barbarossa are the most interesting (even though my inderstanding of latin is limited).

I think his demise makes an interesting extra layer to the story, how even the most glorious persons can die a simple death.

Umberto Eco has an interesting book, Baudolino, which tells about a character near Barbarossa (who is a compulsive liar, so the story should be read with a shipload of salt)
View user's profile Send private message
Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 2,689

PostPosted: Fri 26 Oct, 2007 3:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Baudolino is great. I'd recommend it for anybody who's a fan of Umberto Eco or historical fiction or both--and it has more than enough fantastic elements to satisfy many fantasy readers as well.

Going back to the original topic, one historical subject I'd like to turn into fiction comes from the history of my own country--namely, the 14th-century Battle of Bubat. It was basically a three-way political struggle between a Javanese emperor, his best military commander, and a vassal king that ended in a massive, bloody, and indecisive military clash. None of the three sides involved came out as a clear winner--if anything, all three ended up as clear losers.

I don't think there'd be much sword-work involved, though. The insular Javanese culture is less sword-oriented than most, and we all know that even sword-oriented cultures always have other weapons they can rely on beside the sword.

But, if we may move into the realm of fantasy, right now I'm writing a novel set in a fantasy equivalent of ancient Spain not long after the founding of the initial Phoenician colonies. It's mostly political rather than military, but there are some occasions where the colonists' shieldwalls have to face the locals' javelins and slingstones, and some others where skirmishers from both sides engage in brief but intense clashes. The real fun, though, is probably not going to come until I write a different book roughly based on the politics of late 17th-century Central and Eastern Europe, where I can have both swords and firearms for double fun!
View user's profile Send private message
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2007 5:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
Bruno Giordan wrote:


why a doomed character?

Please elaborate, it is an interesting lead.


Well, the Lost Cause is always compelling, for one thing. Among American Civil War reenactors, Confederate troops outnumber Federal. There are now groups reenacting Waffen SS!

There's just a certain romance about characters you know are doomed, I think. The passage of time makes them the underdog, no matter how unjust their cause may have been. Following such a character emphasizes the inevitable waste of war, especially a civil war such as the War of the Roses. Gaining sympathy for him, then killing him off with a Yorkist arrow to the throat of poleaxe through his head would make a point about war more powerfully than would presenting only the victor's perspective. The audience feels the loss. Or maybe you could tell the story of a family divided between the opposing sides and follow two characters or families. That could be even more powerful, because then everybodyloses.

A recent example: Critics found Clint Eastwood's Letters From Iwo Jima to be a better film than his Flag Of Our Fathers. I think that is partially explained by his telling the story of the doomed. Thinking of Eastwood...His Civil War film, The Beguiled wouldn't be nearly as memorable (to those few of us who remember it) if the main character had survived. Sorry for the spoiler Big Grin If only he'd left Marcia Brady's turtle alone....


thanks, it is an interesting angle.

Such defeated army had also a very good military history, they are also interesting from a learning point of view.

As for Barbarossa, that was my ancestors' enemy at the time of the Lombard League, when northern italian newborn Comuni gained a little autonomy, if not total independence as it would later became for Switzerland..
View user's profile Send private message
Shamsi Modarai




Location: On wuda bearwe, under actreo in şam eorğscræfe.
Joined: 25 Nov 2006
Reading list: 16 books

Posts: 110

PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2007 6:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I can't really think of a specific historical figure or incident right now, as there are too many, but I would really like to see a movie about Vikings done well for once. None of this horrible Pathfinder (2007 version) nonsense. I would LOVE to see something from one of the sagas. Almost any incident out of the sagas would be more interesting than what most movie makers come up with. It wouldn't even matter if it were more "historical" (from one of the family sagas), or if it were more "fantastical" (from one of the legendary sagas). As long as it had some good characters and a good plot, and some nice depictions of weapons and warfare in there somewhere, I'd be happy. (There are also plenty of options for the above-mentioned types of doomed characters in sagas, since fate plays so heavily in them.) Also, filming in Iceland is always good, because of the gorgeous scenery. :-D

Another alternative would be to have a good movie of some interesting/dramatic period of Anglo-Saxon or Germanic history. Personally I think something early, like Migration-Era would be sooo awesome. However, the only thing people tend to think of regarding that period is Beowulf, and they always make terrible adaptations of that story. (IMO!) There are plenty of other stories that could be told from this period! Something actually watchable would be nice for a change. Razz

I would also like to see a movie along the lines of Bernard Cornwell's King Alfred/Saxon series. A fascinating time of Anglo-Scandinavian history, and it could be set partly in York (where I'm currently living) and it could include both Saxon AND Viking shield walls!!!

*swoons*

Wa biğ şam şe sceal of langoşe leofes abidan.

~ The Wife's Lament
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
Elling Polden




Location: Bergen, Norway
Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,576

PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2007 6:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, I'd go for the norwegian civil wars in the 12th century. Would love to see a "rome" style tv series on that.

I've been pondering on a concept where one follows a young nobleman in the following of King Magnus Eirikson, who flees to byzantium to become a Varangian after the defeat in 1184, and end up with the sacking of byzantium in 1202. (after which the varangians dissolve themselves, having been the only force to mount a successful defense of parts of the city.)

"this [fight] looks curious, almost like a game. See, they are looking around them before they fall, to find a dry spot to fall on, or they are falling on their shields. Can you see blood on their cloths and weapons? No. This must be trickery."
-Reidar Sendeman, from King Sverre's Saga, 1201
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Likes: 7 pages

Posts: 2,229

PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2007 8:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The sack of Constantinople was in 1204. I'm reading Geoffrey of Villehardouin's chronicle of the 4th crusade right now... Happy
View user's profile Send private message
Elling Polden




Location: Bergen, Norway
Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,576

PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2007 2:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah, whatever... Razz
Anyhow, King Sverre, the winner of the civil wars, dies in 1202, so it would be safe for the "politcial refugees" to return by 1204.
Not that they do not grant eachother Pardon at most opportunities, though.

"this [fight] looks curious, almost like a game. See, they are looking around them before they fall, to find a dry spot to fall on, or they are falling on their shields. Can you see blood on their cloths and weapons? No. This must be trickery."
-Reidar Sendeman, from King Sverre's Saga, 1201
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Shamsi Modarai




Location: On wuda bearwe, under actreo in şam eorğscræfe.
Joined: 25 Nov 2006
Reading list: 16 books

Posts: 110

PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2007 8:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Whoops....sorry......I just realized the thread was actually asking about novels, not movies. My bad. Blush
Wa biğ şam şe sceal of langoşe leofes abidan.

~ The Wife's Lament
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
Anders Backlund




Location: Sweden
Joined: 24 Oct 2007

Posts: 629

PostPosted: Thu 01 Nov, 2007 1:27 pm    Post subject: Re: The Victual Brothers in the Baltic         Reply with quote

I agree with Shamshi; we seriously need a movie that portrays vikings and viking culture/myths accurately. It's one of those things I always wonder how Hollywood manages to mess up despite its inherent potential. WTF?!

Also, I like Michael's idea. Medival pirates on the Baltic Sea would rock!

Bruno Giordan wrote:

What an interesting piece of history i wouldn't even know of !


Heck, I'm Swedish and I didn't know about it. Razz

Shamsi Modarai wrote:
Whoops....sorry......I just realized the thread was actually asking about novels, not movies. My bad. Blush


Doesn't make you wrong, though.
View user's profile Send private message
David Black Mastro




Location: Central NJ
Joined: 06 Sep 2005
Reading list: 20 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 279

PostPosted: Sun 04 Nov, 2007 6:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Interesting story ideas, folks.


Does anyone here actually write?

"Why meddle with us--you are not strong enough to break us--you know that you have won the battle and slaughtered our army--be content with your honor, and leave us alone, for by God's good will only have we escaped from this business" --unknown Spanish captain to the Chevalier Bayard, at the Battle of Ravenna, 1512
View user's profile Send private message
Hisham Gaballa





Joined: 27 Jan 2005
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 508

PostPosted: Sun 04 Nov, 2007 1:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would move further east. Possible backdrops could be: the wars between the Mamluks and the Mongols/Crusaders in the 13th century, the Timurid Conquests of the late 14th-early 15th century, the Ottoman conquest of Eastern Europe in the 15th-16th century, the Ottoman conquest of Mamluk Egypt and Syria in the eraly 16th centuries, Babur's campaigns in Central Asia and India in the early 16th century.

Actually R. E. Howard mined a lot of this territory already in "Lord of Samarkand":
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Samarcand-Other-Adven...amp;sr=8-5
View user's profile Send private message
David Black Mastro




Location: Central NJ
Joined: 06 Sep 2005
Reading list: 20 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 279

PostPosted: Sun 04 Nov, 2007 1:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hisham Gaballa wrote:
I would move further east. Possible backdrops could be: the wars between the Mamluks and the Mongols/Crusaders in the 13th century, the Timurid Conquests of the late 14th-early 15th century, the Ottoman conquest of Eastern Europe in the 15th-16th century, the Ottoman conquest of Mamluk Egypt and Syria in the eraly 16th centuries, Babur's campaigns in Central Asia and India in the early 16th century.

Actually R. E. Howard mined a lot of this territory already in "Lord of Samarkand":
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Samarcand-Other-Adven...amp;sr=8-5



And let's not forget one of REH's big influences, Harold Lamb.

"Why meddle with us--you are not strong enough to break us--you know that you have won the battle and slaughtered our army--be content with your honor, and leave us alone, for by God's good will only have we escaped from this business" --unknown Spanish captain to the Chevalier Bayard, at the Battle of Ravenna, 1512
View user's profile Send private message
Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Mon 05 Nov, 2007 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Shamsi Modarai wrote:
Whoops....sorry......I just realized the thread was actually asking about novels, not movies. My bad. Blush


Movies are just novels written with a different kind of pen. ....

Both are the same stuff as dreams are made of (vile quotation of a famous phrase ...)
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Plot for a sword age novel - your favourite fantasy
Page 1 of 2 Reply to topic
Go to page 1, 2  Next All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum