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Curt Cummins




Location: Portland, OR
Joined: 03 May 2007

Posts: 63

PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2007 3:28 pm    Post subject: Euroanvils         Reply with quote

I'm pricing out new anvils -does anybody out there have a Euroanvil and how do you like it?

Curt

Ye braggarts and awe be a'skeered and awa, frae Brandoch Daha
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2007 5:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have the #70 Euroanvil and am pleased with its construction and finish. I checked weight using some scales and found mine to actually be close to 180 lbs (would be very close to 80 kg so I am puzzled why they called it a "70.") I like the fact that a person strong enough to really utilize this model can probably lift it manually (with leg bends and caution.) Over half of this anvil's table length has a straight vertical block that transmits forces down to the base, as you see in self made forging anvils for pattern welders. It should be great for forging.

I'm still waiting on the forge (Christmas list item) but can comment on the anvil as having good finish and fairly nice standard sized hardy holes. It had a loud ring when struck out on the horns, until I set it on some lead sheets with caulk. I won't absolutely have to have ear muffs to work with it now.

Blacksmith Supply said it was their most popular model of anvil sold. Freight added around $100 to ship it across a couple of states.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Curt Cummins




Location: Portland, OR
Joined: 03 May 2007

Posts: 63

PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2007 7:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jared,

I'm thinking to get the 286 lb. model on the assumption that the heaviest that I can afford is best. I've pretty much settled on a Diamondback Ironworks 2 burner blacksmith model and a Grizzly knife grinder to get the shop going. The Grizzly looks Chinese made and is cheap, but their doesn't seem to be an intermediate priced grinder. The ones that I've found on line are all in the $1500.00 range. The Grizzly is $285.00 so I'm wondering about quality.

I've already got a decent woodworking tools -belt sander,band saw ,drill press , table saw, oscillating drum sander and a planer that I use in my bowmaking. I've got set of Victor torches in my shop and access to tig/mig and stick welders at work.

I'll be broke soon, but well set up in my shop. Being an empty nester has its advantages.

Curt

Ye braggarts and awe be a'skeered and awa, frae Brandoch Daha
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Reading list: 15 books

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PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2007 8:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am not familiar with the particular anvils in question, but I wanted to point out that the horn, or bic, is one of the areas that people often overlook. Many cheaper anvils have a flat surface on the top of the bic, which undermines the whole point of that portion of the anvil (namely creating curves and other rounded shapes).

Also, and hopefully Jared will find this helpful, wrapping some chain around the waist of the anvil can help quiet it a little bit. Usually two or three wraps is enough, but it still isn't going to be silent, either.

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Curt Cummins




Location: Portland, OR
Joined: 03 May 2007

Posts: 63

PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2007 7:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
I am not familiar with the particular anvils in question, but I wanted to point out that the horn, or bic, is one of the areas that people often overlook. Many cheaper anvils have a flat surface on the top of the bic, which undermines the whole point of that portion of the anvil (namely creating curves and other rounded shapes).

The Euro anvils are double horned and the front horn is rounded - they also have an upsetting block and small square ear on one side for small work. They are Czech made I believe. The 286 lb. anvil is priced at $850.00 - I priced a similar Peddinghaus from Graingers at over $2000.00.

Curt

Also, and hopefully Jared will find this helpful, wrapping some chain around the waist of the anvil can help quiet it a little bit. Usually two or three wraps is enough, but it still isn't going to be silent, either.

-Grey

Ye braggarts and awe be a'skeered and awa, frae Brandoch Daha
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Lee O'Hagan




Location: Northamptonshire,England
Joined: 30 Sep 2003
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2007 11:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Havent seen these anvils personally,so cant comment
But on the intermediate grinder have you seen the coote grinder,

ebay is worth checking weekly on both types of items, jmo.
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2007 1:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lee,
Thanks for pointing out the Coote brand grinder. I did not see that actual base machine prices given, but accessories did seem very affordable (under $50!) I am envisioning the 48" belt length as adequate in a 2" width model.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2007 1:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
I am not familiar with the particular anvils in question, but I wanted to point out that the horn, or bic, is one of the areas that people often overlook. Many cheaper anvils have a flat surface on the top of the bic, which undermines the whole point of that portion of the anvil (namely creating curves and other rounded shapes).


The standard Euroanvil horn is rounded "over the top", but is similar to a 30-60-90 degree triangle having the hypotenuse sloping down on the underside, not a curving "bull horn" style shape.. There is a slight diamond "spot face" flattened area around the hardy hole at the base of the horn-forge table area (which is necessary), that is as close to the forging table as possible. The surface finishing on my anvils flat area was very good (almost 32 to 64 RMS, like a high end table saw surface.) The finishing of the horn was more like "sand blasted" with black paint over it. The horn would take a little work to make it equal to those an anvils costing about 3X as much money. However, when one examines the upsetting block, and qualities for forging, this seems to be designed specifically for forging rather than farrier work.

Other forums for blacksmithing have commented favorably on the anvil. It is reportedly a little softer than a true "forged tool steel" surface (being cast tool steel), but seems to be adequate.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Lee O'Hagan




Location: Northamptonshire,England
Joined: 30 Sep 2003
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Posts: 509

PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2007 1:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey Jared,
prices are on the site,48" starts around $350 i think, (cost of moter to add)
nice machine and well made,But,
There is far more options in the market in the 72" belt,just a fyi,
$50 more for the 72" but if your stateside well worth it.
i have a 48"x2".all i really need as a general hobbyist, but the bigger gives you more options i believe,also more longevity in the belt life,
some other fine grinders out there,but notably more money,
start with a coote,and there is a definate market to move it on as and when your ready for the bigger and better,or keep the smaller for woodwork-finishing etc,
good few people on here with more hands on experience than me will hopefully chime in,
but for the price paid i couldnt find anything to touch the coote till you added a fair bit more money,
48" is great 72" is a wee bit better Wink
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