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J Anstey





Joined: 21 Jul 2007

Posts: 233

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2007 9:00 am    Post subject: Swords from Norway         Reply with quote

Hi there,

I am currebtly working on a design for a corporate logo for an Iron ore mining company situated in Norway. I had the thought of using an image of a sword from the Viking era.

Can someone help me with finding an image of a sword from the region and era.

Any historical references would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Jason

PS. Its not every day I get to mix work with a genuine interest

Happy
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J Anstey





Joined: 21 Jul 2007

Posts: 233

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2007 9:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

... a shield image might also be useful Happy
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Nils Anderssen




Location: Drammen, Norway
Joined: 08 Dec 2005

Posts: 61

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2007 10:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This might be helpfull:

http://stud.imma.dk/deltahak/nils.anderssen/norskesverd.htm

A lot of nice drawings and pictures Happy

If you google "viking shield" you will find many good examples.

Good luck with your project!


N.
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J Anstey





Joined: 21 Jul 2007

Posts: 233

PostPosted: Mon 24 Sep, 2007 11:42 pm    Post subject: snippits of trivia         Reply with quote

Hi again,

I am hopeing that some of the knowledgeable people on this forum might be able to assist me in this research.

I am looking for steel related snippits of information or quotes that I can adapt to use for a brochure that I am creating for an Iron mining company in the north of Norway.

I have quickly written an example, but please please, remember that I am very new to the history of Viking and western swords in general. In fact I have only just started Big Grin

So this is the bit, that will need a lot of correcting but here it is anyway.

"After the Iron age came the period commonly referred to as the 'Age of the Vikings" AD 780 -1100. Iron was considered more valuable than gold and silver. Carbon added to ore from the iron rich areas such as Kirkines, was smelted to create steel of varying properties. Some very hard and brittle whilst others were softer and more malleable. The Norsemen excelled in the forging of steel and produced some of the first pattern welded steels (often, but incorrectly referred to as damascus steel) and created swords that rival the blades from the famous smiths of Japan, albeit at some 400 years earlier. Examples of these blades still exist in Museums in Norway and throughout Europe."

Please feel free to edit, add, throw it in the trash,, whatever.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Jason
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Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 916

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2007 4:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, this article is on this very website,

http://www.myArmoury.com/feature_geibig.html

Than you can look at www.vikingsword.com (appropriately named).


After that you can also do a google image search by viking sword in google

http://images.google.it/images?hl=it&q=vi...&gbv=2

which will lead to many fine replicas images and to pics of some originals.

From that you could surely morph out something useful enough to represent a viking sword.
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Elling Polden




Location: Bergen, Norway
Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

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Posts: 1,576

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2007 4:40 am    Post subject: Re: snippits of trivia         Reply with quote

J Anstey wrote:
Hi again,


"After the Iron age came the period commonly referred to as the 'Age of the Vikings" AD 780 -1100. Iron was considered more valuable than gold and silver. Carbon added to ore from the iron rich areas such as Kirkines, was smelted to create steel of varying properties. Some very hard and brittle whilst others were softer and more malleable. The Norsemen excelled in the forging of steel and produced some of the first pattern welded steels (often, but incorrectly referred to as damascus steel) and created swords that rival the blades from the famous smiths of Japan, albeit at some 400 years earlier. Examples of these blades still exist in Museums in Norway and throughout Europe."


For one, the town is called "Kirkenes", with a e.
Most larger farms would have a forge, for producing nails and the like. Some dedicated smiths would become very skilled indeed. However, many of the blades where imported from the continent, and hilted locally. This might have been a simple case of demand outstripping local production, or that foreign smiths where belived to be more skilled.

Pattern welding had been known since roman times, so saying that the norsemen where among the first would be something of an overstatement.

"this [fight] looks curious, almost like a game. See, they are looking around them before they fall, to find a dry spot to fall on, or they are falling on their shields. Can you see blood on their cloths and weapons? No. This must be trickery."
-Reidar Sendeman, from King Sverre's Saga, 1201
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J Anstey





Joined: 21 Jul 2007

Posts: 233

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2007 4:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Elling

That info is exactly what I need, thank you. Woops the spelling was also my typo.

How much earlier was pattern welded steel being produced?

Can you think of any other achievements, iron wise
that might be attributed to Norway?

Thanks again

Cheers

Jason
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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Posts: 1,532

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2007 5:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The practice of piling and pattern welding is known as far back as 3rd and 7th century B.C. Etruscan swords. Due to corrosion in the surviving examples, we don't really know how attractive those swords were cosmetically.
Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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