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Chris Arrington





Joined: 06 Apr 2007

Posts: 115

PostPosted: Fri 07 Sep, 2007 1:18 pm    Post subject: Any Latin Speakers Around?         Reply with quote

Hi Guys

I was looking at mottos for a crest I was making and wanted to translate it into Latin.

The motto I was looking to use is:

"For God and my Father"

And the internet translation page I found suggested:

"Pro Deus quod meus Abbas"

I know the accuracy of internet translation pages, so I thought I would ask if it makes sense here.

Any help is much appreciated.
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Mike Arledge




Location: Indianapolis, IN
Joined: 05 Feb 2006
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 434

PostPosted: Fri 07 Sep, 2007 1:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Any Latin Speakers Around?         Reply with quote

Chris Arrington wrote:
Hi Guys

I was looking at mottos for a crest I was making and wanted to translate it into Latin.

The motto I was looking to use is:

"For God and my Father"

And the internet translation page I found suggested:

"Pro Deus quod meus Abbas"

I know the accuracy of internet translation pages, so I thought I would ask if it makes sense here.

Any help is much appreciated.


I am a bit rusty, but I think this is a decent word by word translation. Others might be able to offer something more elegant for sure, but that seems acceptable generally speaking.

Edit to add:
To reiterate my rust, I wonder why they chose the Abba route for father rather than "Pater"? and I imagine you could use either "quod" or "et" for and.

I thus give: "Pro Deus et mei patris"

I could be off on the conjugations on the endings though, no dictionary around.

Mike J Arledge

The Dude Abides
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Joel Chesser




Location: Oklahoma
Joined: 23 Oct 2003

Posts: 714

PostPosted: Fri 07 Sep, 2007 8:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm a pretty rusty too, but what mike put looks pretty good to me. Unfortunately I also am unsure about the conjugations.
..." The person who dosen't have a sword should sell his coat and buy one."

- Luke 22:36
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Randall Moffett




Location: Northern Utah
Joined: 07 Jun 2006
Reading list: 5 books

Posts: 2,098

PostPosted: Fri 07 Sep, 2007 11:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you are introducing a new sentance you could use quod. I think I'd go with et if I understand your meaning but I'll leave that up to you. Other than that here are a few things.

Pro is always followed by an ablative form of the noun. For whom it is directed. Just like per is always followed by accusative.

I will leave you some info to put it together best you think.

Here is Deus Declensions singular

Deus- nomitive (subject)
Dei- Genitive (possession)
Deo- Dative (indirect object)
Deum- accusative (direct object)
Deo- ablative (latin for irregular)

I have never seen Abbas used in latin outside the bible.I'd go with Pater-
Pater-nom
Patris-gen
Patri-dat
Patrem-acc
Patre-abltv

Hope that helps

RPM
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Andy Ferrato





Joined: 10 Sep 2007

Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 3:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey guys,

Supposed to be getting a tattoo next week as the girl i'm seeing has kinda conned me into it.

The idea i've got is getting "I got this to impress a girl" in latin on my calf but don't really trust internet engine translations.

i'm also happy changing the wording slightly as long as it's along the same lines if it makes the translation more pallatable.

Cheers

Andy
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Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 4:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

[quote=\"Andy Ferrato\"]Hey guys,

Supposed to be getting a tattoo next week as the girl i\'m seeing has kinda conned me into it.

The idea i\'ve got is getting \"I got this to impress a girl\" in latin on my calf but don\'t really trust internet engine translations.

i\'m also happy changing the wording slightly as long as it\'s along the same lines if it makes the translation more pallatable.

Cheers

Andy[/quote]

OMNIA MVNDA MVNDIS

Don Lisander (Manzoni)

or

SEMEL IN ANNO INSANIRE LICET, si parva licet componere magnis
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Andy Ferrato





Joined: 10 Sep 2007

Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 4:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bruno Giordan wrote:
[quote=\"Andy Ferrato\"]Hey guys,

Supposed to be getting a tattoo next week as the girl i\'m seeing has kinda conned me into it.

The idea i\'ve got is getting \"I got this to impress a girl\" in latin on my calf but don\'t really trust internet engine translations.

i\'m also happy changing the wording slightly as long as it\'s along the same lines if it makes the translation more pallatable.

Cheers

Andy


OMNIA MVNDA MVNDIS

Don Lisander (Manzoni)

or

SEMEL IN ANNO INSANIRE LICET, si parva licet componere magnis[/quote]

Cheers for the quick reply. "OMNIA MVNDA MVNDIS" would look great. What's the literal translation?
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Oliver Wiegand




Location: Germany
Joined: 07 Aug 2007

Posts: 22

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 5:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Andy,

The translation of "OMNIA MVNDA MVNDIS" is:

"Everything is pure for someone who is pure." Or "To the pure all things are pure"

This is maybe not a really matching translation as I had to translate it into German and than back into English.

Best

Oliver
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Bruno Giordan





Joined: 28 Sep 2005

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Andy Ferrato wrote:
Bruno Giordan wrote:
[quote=\"Andy Ferrato\"]Hey guys,

Supposed to be getting a tattoo next week as the girl i\'m seeing has kinda conned me into it.

The idea i\'ve got is getting \"I got this to impress a girl\" in latin on my calf but don\'t really trust internet engine translations.

i\'m also happy changing the wording slightly as long as it\'s along the same lines if it makes the translation more pallatable.

Cheers

Andy


OMNIA MVNDA MVNDIS

Don Lisander (Manzoni)

or


SEMEL IN ANNO INSANIRE LICET, si parva licet componere magnis


Cheers for the quick reply. "OMNIA MVNDA MVNDIS" would look great. What's the literal translation?[/quote]

Omnia munda is from a famous character of the best italian language writer, Alessandro (don lisander in milanese) Manzoni.

I think it has a deep meaning that I would better see engraved on my skin permanently would I ever commit the folly of entering e tattoo shop.

Semel in anno insanire licet is age old latin, it means that even to normal people it is consented to make a folly once a year.

Also a very popular phrase, with a nice meaning.
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Toni Lozica




Location: Rotterdam, NL / Korcula, HR
Joined: 13 Dec 2006

Posts: 32

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 12:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well I'm not an expert on latin but I would say:

PRO DEUS ET PATER MEUS!

This if the meaning of English sentence is like "FOR GOD (being god almighty) and MY FATHER (being actual physical father and not god as father).
And it even rhymes
Laughing Out Loud

Parce mihi Domine quia Dalmata sum!
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Chris Arrington





Joined: 06 Apr 2007

Posts: 115

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 12:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Guys !



I appreciate your help.
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John Cooksey




Location: NW Ark
Joined: 15 Nov 2003

Posts: 291

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 2:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Abba/Abbas isn't even Latin, is it?
Having never read any Christian texts in Latin, isn't "abba" West Semitic?[/i]

I didn't surrender, but they took my horse and made him surrender.
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Toni Lozica




Location: Rotterdam, NL / Korcula, HR
Joined: 13 Dec 2006

Posts: 32

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 3:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Abbas should be like abbot.
Check "Carmina Burana" of Carl Orff. There is a song that begins with: "Ego sum abbas Cucaniensis......"
"Abbas" should mean father but in more religious sense, like abbot, holy father. What is most often used for father is "pater, patris".

Parce mihi Domine quia Dalmata sum!
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Toni Lozica




Location: Rotterdam, NL / Korcula, HR
Joined: 13 Dec 2006

Posts: 32

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 3:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Check this site out:

http://www.sunsite.ubc.ca/LatinDictionary/

Seems OK to me only goes from Latin to English.

Parce mihi Domine quia Dalmata sum!
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John Cooksey




Location: NW Ark
Joined: 15 Nov 2003

Posts: 291

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 7:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Toni Lozica wrote:
Abbas should be like abbot.
Check "Carmina Burana" of Carl Orff. There is a song that begins with: "Ego sum abbas Cucaniensis......"
"Abbas" should mean father but in more religious sense, like abbot, holy father. What is most often used for father is "pater, patris".


It is a loan word! From Koine, and to Koine from West Semitic (Hebrew/Aramaic/Syriac).
Cool. Had no idea it was used at all in ecclesiastical Latin, but shouldn't be surprised, I guess.
Still hear it all the time in the middle east.

I didn't surrender, but they took my horse and made him surrender.
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Alberto Dainese




Location: Padova - Italy
Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Reading list: 14 books

Posts: 37

PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2007 11:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Any Latin Speakers Around?         Reply with quote

Chris Arrington wrote:

I was looking at mottos for a crest I was making and wanted to translate it into Latin.

The motto I was looking to use is:

"For God and my Father"



Hi,
I will use Pro+Ablative (as Randall said) so the motto would be "Pro Deo et/ac Patre Meo". "Et" or "Ac" is Latin for "And".

E.G.: the motto of Italian Military Chaplains is "Pro Deo et Patria" (For God and Country).

Sani!
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Randall Moffett




Location: Northern Utah
Joined: 07 Jun 2006
Reading list: 5 books

Posts: 2,098

PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2007 12:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That looks and sounds good to me. Good luck.

RPM
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Andy Ferrato





Joined: 10 Sep 2007

Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2007 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i'm gonna go with, SEMEL IN ANNO INSANIRE LICET. (Thanks Bruno)

Does anyone know what the best font or text style would be best (or most authentic) to use for it?
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Mick Czerep




Location: Poland
Joined: 30 May 2007

Posts: 59

PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2007 6:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Andy!
Here's a nice site to look at when contemplating scripts:
http://medievalwriting.50megs.com/writing.htm
It will give you a general understanding of the shape of letters in various hands. This knowledge you can then use to pick the one that would suit your crest the most as far as dating and geographical area are concerned.
Cheers
Mick

Sordes ocurrit
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Andy Ferrato





Joined: 10 Sep 2007

Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2007 8:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Would i be correct in applying something like this...

http://www.sweb.cz/ls78/images/tajrmalph.gif

to the phrase SEMEL IN ANNO INSANIRE LICET or am i over simplifying...

also i've seen it as SEMEL IN ANNO LICET INSANIRE on the internet too, is this a notable differance?

sorry if i'm sounding pedantic but i don't want to get something tattoo'd on myself permanently just to have some oxford student tell me i'm an idiot in 5 years. Plus you guys are are too intelligent, to not wring you of as much information as possible.
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