Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Accomodations on the campaign trail? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
John H





Joined: 08 May 2006

Posts: 60

PostPosted: Thu 24 May, 2007 2:37 pm    Post subject: Accomodations on the campaign trail?         Reply with quote

I have a question about the accomodations men-at-arms, as well as the rest of a typical 15th century army, might have while in the field on a campaign. How elaborate where their encampments? Who had tents/pavilions? What was used for bedrolls? Etc.

Thanks in adnvance for any insights.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Reading list: 3 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,435

PostPosted: Thu 24 May, 2007 6:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, a tent is made of a lot of cloth, and from what I know cloth was expensive back then, so I figure only important people would have a big one. I'm sure the lesser soldiers carried some sort of prop tent or some sort of protection from the elements, even if it was only a blanket put up by sticks.

M.

This space for rent or lease.
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
Gordon Frye




Location: Kingston, Washington
Joined: 20 Apr 2004
Reading list: 15 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 1,191

PostPosted: Thu 24 May, 2007 10:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Generally, whenever possible, soldiers (especially the higher social class ones) were quartered among the peasantry or townsmen. Makes things MUCH easier when packing for a campaign! True enough, most of the higher-ups had tentage and camp furniture for when this wasn't possible, but if you read some of the treatises of the day (well, certainly the 16th and 17th Centuries) they often discuss how men should be quartered by the Quarter-Master. His job was to ride ahead of the army to locate proper quarters, and then to divy them up according to rank and priviledge. Usually this meant that the Cavalry got first dibs. Big Grin

This was generally pretty hard on the local populations who were not only expected to house the unwanted guests, but the feed them as well, and try to keep them from outraging their wives and daughters to boot. There's a good reason that peasants enjoyed catching foraging soldiers far from any help, and gaining some measure of revenge. Eek! This is also why the Bill of Rights of the US Constitution specifically forbids the quartering of troops on civilians without specific laws enacted to regulate the practice. The Founding Fathers were aware of the unfortunate consequences of such practices.

Of course, there were plenty of wagons and pack horses carrying tents, bedrolls and camp furniture tagging along with any army on the march, as well as camp followers carrying such things on their backs as well. There's a good reason why armies didn't march very far per day.

BTW, usually each Cavalryman (16th and early 17th Centuries at least) had at least one mounted servant with him, who was responsible for any bedding and baggage that they may need, while a Man-at-Arms often had several servants and was supposed to have upwards of five horses in his train. One for him to ride on the campaign trail, one for his servant, and three war horses. The war horses could, as needed, pack any kit that they were bringing along.

Cheers!

Gordon

"After God, we owe our victory to our Horses"
Gonsalo Jimenez de Quesada
http://www.renaissancesoldier.com/
http://historypundit.blogspot.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger
Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 2,689

PostPosted: Fri 25 May, 2007 7:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

To make a long story short, let me refer you to two online sources. The first is an article about the Burgundian Ordonnances:

http://www.geocities.com/thorvin.geo/ordinances.htm

And the second is Brian Ditcham's dissertation on the employment of mercenary troops in 15th-century France.

http://www.deremilitari.org/resources/articles/ditcham1.htm

Both of them deal extensively with the question of camping and billeting the troops.
View user's profile Send private message
John H





Joined: 08 May 2006

Posts: 60

PostPosted: Fri 25 May, 2007 8:44 am    Post subject: Thanks for the explanation!         Reply with quote

...and those links are fantastic!
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Accomodations on the campaign trail?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum