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Michal Plezia
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Location: Poland
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PostPosted: Tue 21 Aug, 2007 9:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I plan to add some plates in the arm section-so there will not be as much space as now.Brigandine is quite flexible armour so I think it won't be a problem.

I recently saw a commercial with a powder for dry cleaning of carpets...maybe I'll use it.I hope it won't react with brass... WTF?!
I'll make some tests Cool
I am afraid of using water.Linen after wash usually gets creased.It will be impossible to iron a brigandine. Worried

Gary-you're not saying you walked into carwash in it and washed it on you,are you? Wink

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The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 9:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ok.Finished.I decided not to attach shoulder plates so far.Enjoy
















www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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Felix R.




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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 9:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This piece looks magnificent.
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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks.I gained experience.My next one will be much better.I plan to use chamois leather this time.It would be much stronger than linen.
www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 10:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michal Plezia wrote:
Thanks.I gained experience.My next one will be much better.I plan to use chamois leather this time.It would be much stronger than linen.



That looks really good. Cool Making them just for yourself ? Or could you start making/selling them to others ?

Oh, would chamois leather over a linen base be stronger than either alone ?

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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 11:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am thinking of selling them..I don't really need more than 2 myself ; Wink

Chamois/suede +linen would be better than linen alone...There are 2 types of linen used in this project.Inside layers are very heavy-and there would be great to have outer layer as heavy and strong too.But they sell it only in some very unatractive colours Worried So I used as strong red linen I could find-it should be enough for now.I'll do more searching for materials anyway.

You seem to be quite interested in my project Jean Wink Be patient-my next brig will be perfected.And I'll try to sell it on myArmoury. Cool

www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 12:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice work.

How many hours would you guess went into the project?

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 12:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Using myArmoury.com's "historical arms talk" forum to conduct business--the discussion of selling items and the specifics of that sale--is not appropriate. I've removed all business-related discussions, including the conversation about sizing and payment details to/from Poland. This forum is meant as an informational resource not a means by which sales are conducted.

All person-to-person private, non-business sales should be listed in "The Marketplace" and, even there, the details of such a sale should be discussed in private and not in public. The Marketplace is really appropriate only for re-selling of items purchased elsewhere. Items made by the seller are really walking the line for that forum. Some fit. Others don't. Sales involving items built for sale, built to spec, and other business-related non-private sales are meant only to be posted in the "Makers" forum. Please see This Announcement for further info about that particular detail.

Thank you.

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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 1:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am sorry Nathan.I'll try to keep the topic clean this time.I was just too excited.


By the way I've found an interesting drawing of the brigandine with brig pauldrons.Any thoughts about it?

www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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J. Bedell




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PostPosted: Fri 24 Aug, 2007 2:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Has anyone tried brig pauldrons? It seems like they would severly limit mobility. How well could you lift your arms with them on? I know the plates slide on each other but I think the top plate hitting against the body of the brig would be the key area that would pose a threat to mobility.

-James

The pen may be mighter, but the sword is much more fun.
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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Sun 26 Aug, 2007 6:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think the mobility would be much greater than in all-steel pieces.I plan to make brig pauldrons for myself...so I'll certainly share any gained experience and observations.
www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Sun 26 Aug, 2007 6:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joe Fults wrote:
Nice work.

How many hours would you guess went into the project?


Hmm I don't know.It took 'only' 6 weeks thanks to the Craig Nadler whose website encouraged me to start a project and whose patterns were the base for any of improvements and modifications Wink The most difficult and boring work is riveting.It took most of the time-5-8 hours a day.

www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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Robert Fullerton




Location: arizona
Joined: 19 Sep 2007

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PostPosted: Wed 19 Sep, 2007 9:36 am    Post subject: makers         Reply with quote

yeah.. a group in ukraine make accurate armour and include brigande .. if they dont have it they can make it.. i believe it's called armstreet
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Lawrence Parramore





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PostPosted: Fri 14 Mar, 2008 4:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi, you are looking for couters too? i have been looking at the Equestrian Statue Prague (don't know how to link it) and Jany Kobr has listed some great photos of it and I think this is somewhere between a coat of plates and a brigandine, please correct me and point me in the right direction of anything similar.
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Troy G L Williams




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PostPosted: Fri 14 Mar, 2008 10:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm sure I have mentioned him before but I believe Oleg Yanchuk can help for all your needs. Here is a pic he has sent me of my brigande.


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v/r,
Troy Williams

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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Mar, 2008 12:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For my tuppence worth, I have a White Rose brigandine and I personally think it is a very nice piece of work and well worth the £750 sterling I paid for it 3 years ago.

Tod

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Steve Lunn




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Mar, 2008 5:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hiya folks

I was told that a few folks folks had queried why i have put linings into my brigandines so i thought i should pop on a post just to explain why.

While there is only a couple of brigandines in the many surviving examples that show evidence of a partial/full lining these are the exception and not the rule, so i do agree that brigandines en mass do not have a lining.... so why have them?

I put them on for a few reasons, but the main ones are safety and reduction of damage to additional kit.

I've had a couple of customers who received injuries when their maille voiders caught in the plates preventing them from moving their arm correctly, stopping them forming a solid defensive parry. They were hit quite badly and injured during display combats so i added the lining for them purely from a safety aspect.

The other main reason is that people are spending £300+ on accurate fully tailored arming doublets and the plates are rubbing on the inside causing damage to the doublet as it's a much lighter material. While wear and tear on the arming doublet is inevitable when wearing any armour, i don't want people being turned away from such a great body defense simply because it has a higher rate of wear against the garments underneath.

Other than for the education department at the royal armouries, ever other museum brigandine i have made doesn't have a lining and i for one would prefer to make them without a lining and hand tin the plates as they would be more accurate, but since this is a hobby for the vast majority of people, keeping the cost down to a minimum also has to be a factor for both myself and the customer.

I hope this clears up why i put linings in my brigs.

Also, on the brigandine pauldrons/spaulders, i think that the ones we see dating to the fifteenth century are really just covered with material and not true brigandine construction. I have seen sixteenth century ones but not early than that. As for making them, they're difficult but not impossible with care and attention. I've popped on a link to a pair i used to have but which are now at the tower of london.

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d191/mydwynter/stevebrig3.gif
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Antoine Selosse





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PostPosted: Sun 22 Feb, 2009 2:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello,
to reactivate this discussion, let me introduce a new link : http://troiscouronnes.unblog.fr
You will find a lot of information about brigandine and a making of in progress.
(Sorry : this is a french website...)
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Thom R.




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PostPosted: Thu 03 Dec, 2009 9:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thread necromancy is becoming my new calling Big Grin

Although I wouldn't call it a brigandine, but rather a coat of plates, I did recently order and receive a coat of plates from Steel-mastery in the Ukraine. Steel mastery had a lot of positive reviews for a few years, then there seemed to be some negative reviews - mostly based on time to completion I gather - and so now a year or so removed from that controversy I thought I ought to do a report out on my experience. Overall I am very pleased with their service and product.

This is a newer design of theirs based on a coat of plates found at Visby. So although it has liner - which is probably not historically accurate (I may remove it) and makes it hard for me to show the plates - everything else about the coat seems reasonably close to a mid 14th c coat of plates. The steel is somewhere between 16 and 18 gauge from what I can tell. The front plates are shaped which I assume must have been true with the original as well because of the size of the plates. The inner liner is linen or muslin, the outer coat is wool. The lower edge is dagged which is a nice touch. The strapping is nicely done although I would have preferred longer straps to make it easier to reach around my back and buckle myself "in". May have to re-do the straps. The stitching is not by hand but is nicely done and strong, as is the riveting. The total weight of the coat is 18 pounds (8.2 kg). Fits very well.

As for service, I ordered via Ebay on October 20th. The next day Oksana sent me an email with a word-doc that had a template for measurements. We had a few days of back/forth on details via email in English. Communicating in English was no problem. I chose black for the wool coat. On November 23rd they let me know it was in the mail. I received it today December 3. Six weeks total is quite fast as far as I am concerned. Here are some photos. As I play with it and modify it some I will let everyone know more.

front


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JG Elmslie
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PostPosted: Thu 03 Dec, 2009 5:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

ia! ia! Brigandine! Rise from the dead!

*shakes a few chicken bones at the thread*


sorry, could'nt resist.

just a thought, since the thread has shambled from the crypt for a breath of fresh air, anyone know of reference material about upper leg defences with brigandines? a bit of poking recently through Arms and Armor of the Medieval Knight did'nt come up with much - if it's plate, the fauld drops to the hip level, and in a longish brig, the same sort of coverage is available there... but then there's tassets in front of the cuisses on plate... anyone know if there was an equivalent on brigandines when they were worn with leg armour?

[/i]
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