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Bjorn Hagstrom




Location: Höör, Skane
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
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PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 1:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Timo Nieminen wrote:


Nothing like this in Waldman that I saw. I haven't seen anything like this except for one being sold on ebay. Looks like a mutant partisan.


Thanks for that, mystery still to be solved, but then I don't have to rush to get a copy of Waldman's (yet anyway)
But somehow the shape just speaks to me!

There is nothing quite as sad as a one man conga-line...
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Daniel Staberg




Location: Gothenburg/Sweden
Joined: 30 Apr 2005
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Posts: 563

PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 2:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It is a "korsgevär" in Swedish, from the German "Kurzgewehr" or "Kurzwehr" which was a type of polearms carried by the non-commisioned officers in the Swedish army from the late 17th Century. You also find this type of polearm in the hands of city watchmen and the firewatch in the 18th Century. The photo you posted looks very similar to the pattern of "korsgevär" that the Swedish army adopted in 1697. (Today labled "korsgevär M/1697).
"There is nothing more hazardous than to venture a battle. One can lose it
by a thousand unforseen circumstances, even when one has thorougly taken all
precautions that the most perfect military skill allows for."
-Fieldmarshal Lennart Torstensson.
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Nicholas Barton




Location: Australia
Joined: 17 Jun 2012

Posts: 13

PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 5:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

all this talk of different timber for hafts has me thinking, i know its not period but what about Australian Gum, i'm shafting a pole-hammer and a Dane Axe soon and i recon it would be good and strong not to mention solid

does anyone have any experience with it or just me?

Why are you standing still?
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Mike O'Hara




Location: New Zealand
Joined: 10 Jul 2010
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Posts: 113

PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 5:30 pm    Post subject: Timber for hafts         Reply with quote

Hi Nicholas

Those of in the Southern hemisphere do indeed need to look about a bit for alternatives. Wink

I think you might find gum a bit splintery unless it was very well seasoned and prepared. That is purely based on my experience with what I have been able to get across the ditch, here.

You really need a good, long grain that is very easy to smooth and is not prone to splintering when dry or when damaged. I tried jarrah for wasters and while it is dense and strong it is short grained and prone to breaking once dry.

Luckily for you, Tasmanian White Oak is excellent - someone here imports it and I've used it for a sparth (the galloglass ancestor of the Dane Axe), for a whole set of practise pollaxes (rubber heads) and for all of the wasters I make. It has really stood up to the test to date.

Ash is very hard to find in NZ.

cheers
mike

MIke O'Hara
Location: Plimmerton, New Zealand
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Ryan S.





Joined: 04 May 2012

Posts: 132

PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 7:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Daniel Staberg wrote:
It is a "korsgevär" in Swedish, from the German "Kurzgewehr" or "Kurzwehr" which was a type of polearms carried by the non-commisioned officers in the Swedish army from the late 17th Century. You also find this type of polearm in the hands of city watchmen and the firewatch in the 18th Century. The photo you posted looks very similar to the pattern of "korsgevär" that the Swedish army adopted in 1697. (Today labled "korsgevär M/1697).


I believe Kurzgewehr is now the name for a bull pup rifle, because I saw it translated at the in the Dresden Grünes Gewölbe.
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Bjorn Hagstrom




Location: Höör, Skane
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
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Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 336

PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 11:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Daniel Staberg wrote:
It is a "korsgevär" in Swedish, from the German "Kurzgewehr" or "Kurzwehr" which was a type of polearms carried by the non-commisioned officers in the Swedish army from the late 17th Century. You also find this type of polearm in the hands of city watchmen and the firewatch in the 18th Century. The photo you posted looks very similar to the pattern of "korsgevär" that the Swedish army adopted in 1697. (Today labled "korsgevär M/1697).


That rings a bell! I faintly remeber seeing something like it at "Torpa Stenhus" some 30 years ago..
I was searching on spontoons to see if I could find a match, but I should have searched closer to home, I guess Happy
And the good news is that then I assume that some standard haft lenght is probably recorded in some document somewhere for me to find!

And did I just make my first unintentional purchase for Great Norhtern War-reenactment? Eek!

Anyway, hopefully my repro is in transit, and I will post pictures when I get it!

There is nothing quite as sad as a one man conga-line...
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Bjorn Hagstrom




Location: Höör, Skane
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 336

PostPosted: Tue 22 Jul, 2014 1:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

And here is the repro:
2 foot long blade, mounted on 9 foot of ash haft for a total length of 11 foot. Quite a challenge to manouvre around, and almost as difficult to find a good place to store and display indoors Razz




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