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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Thu 20 Nov, 2003 2:40 pm    Post subject: historicallly accurate bows         Reply with quote

Hello everyone,
I have recently purchased a bow, arrows, and an armguard from a company with which I am quite pleased. I was especially pleased to add a historicall accurate weapon to my colliction for only $200.00. Although the bow is wuite plain it looks just like those shown in many illustrations of the middle ages. I have shhot in a range and the arrows go where they are supposed to for atleast 85 yards. I am no archer, however. In any case they have a selection of bow height and pull weights. So I just thought I would give them a plug as they have no site, so if anyone is interested please ask. Thanks, Jeremy
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Fri 21 Nov, 2003 7:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow! That seems like a great price. Is this a true English longbow? How much are their arrows?
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 Nov, 2003 7:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, my bow is called a "longbow" but with a 44lb. pull, it cannot be. I know they have different weights but I don't know if any are significant enough to qualify as an English longbow. The arrows are
$40 for six and $75 for twelve. The arrows are not as historically accurate. I have read that a english longbow could reach 300 yards- now THAT is a longbow!
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David Quivey




Location: Davis, California
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PostPosted: Fri 21 Nov, 2003 7:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Longbow denotes more a construction style, as opposed to a draw weight, so it is quite possible for you to have a longbow with 44 draw Wink That is an excellent price! I have been looking for a good longbow myself, and if you recommend this bowyer, I would love to get in contact with him!
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 Nov, 2003 9:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Retired Rogue Archery
291 Pleasant Street
East Dorset, VT. 05253
1-800-773-1657
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 Nov, 2003 4:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

So what is the difference between a true longbow and the other. In my reading it seems to me that an English longbow was a different animal altogether regarding it's extensive range. This extensive range and the French refusal to acknowledge it led to a key French deafeat in around 1358; I cannot remember the name of the battle and am to lazy to look it up.
My understanding was that a longbow may pull at 75lbs. or more. I mean my bow and the others I have seen range form 5.5'-6.6' tall (un-strung). So does draw weight relate to range? Again, I emphasize that I am no archer but very interested in gaining knowledge re: the issue Thanks so much.
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Shawn Mulock




Location: Calgary Alberta, Canada
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PostPosted: Sat 22 Nov, 2003 6:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If I am not mistaken, most longbows taken to the field by the English had an average pull of about 100# and I do not even have the slightest idea what the draw was.
"It is not what you have, but what you have done".
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David Quivey




Location: Davis, California
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PostPosted: Sun 23 Nov, 2003 8:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

*wracks brain trying to remember* Well, the original longbows used by the English troops at Crecy and Agincourt had, as Shawn said, a draw (or pull) weight of about 90 - 150#. That gave them a range of about 180 - 200 yrds or more, depending on the arrow. They were about 5 feet tall when braced, and were also made from one solid stave of yew.
The draw weight does indeed effect the range of the arrow, as well as the point of aim. The greater the weight, the longer the range, and the more accurate the arrow. Of course, the weight of the arrow itself also effects the range of flight; heavier arrows tending to travel farther on heavier weight bows than lighter arrows.
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Cal Harling




Location: Greensboro NC
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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2003 12:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I know that in England, for most of the medieval period, it was actually illegal to practice archery at a range of less than 220 yards with a "prick shaft" or flight arrow. I believe the fine was 6 shillings, which would have been substantial for the time. A heavier war arrow, such as a bodkin, was still expected to have an effective range of at least 200 yards. For a 30 inch draw length this requires a pull weight of at least 100 pounds. My general impression is that longbows used during the period of the 100 years war, during which Crecy and Agincourt were fought, probably averaged slightly over 100 pounds draw weight.
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James Aldrich




Location: Green Bay WI
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Dec, 2003 10:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
So what is the difference between a true longbow and the other.


It's the combination of the bow and the archer, emphasis on the latter, that made the "English longbow" so effective. D cross-section self bows are ancient and widespread. They are inefficent transducers of energy as bows go; cheap, forgiving of shooter error, and rather ordinary in fact.

The English archer, by contrast, was quite extraordinary-- trained from childhood, treated with respect, motivated by the very real prospect of improving his financial and social position through military service.

The bows recovered from the Mary Rose range from 80 to 160# draw weight. To handle such weapons effectively requires more technique and practice than brute strength. Medieval English archers' remains are readily identifiable by their peculiar skeletal development.

See Robert Hardy, Longbow: A Social and Military History
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Thu 04 Dec, 2003 12:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello James,
This is very interesting. Especially related to the skeletal differences you mentioned. I believe that my conclusion regarding my "longbow" is that it is a replica of no English longbow as the manufacturers claim, but more of a run-of-the-mill bow from the Continent. Which is actually quite fine with me- as I am no expert of the bow. My interest is to have high quality weapons, or the very best that I can obtain, while remaining near the realm of sensible expenditure, and build a somewhat generic collection of representative weapons from the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries. I do believe I need to have the afore mentioned bower make me a bow of yew instead of ash or I really can't remember. . .
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Lee Watts




Location: Wales, UK ,europe
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 144

PostPosted: Thu 04 Dec, 2003 2:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
Well, my bow is called a "longbow" but with a 44lb. pull, it cannot be. I know they have different weights but I don't know if any are significant enough to qualify as an English longbow. The arrows are
$40 for six and $75 for twelve. The arrows are not as historically accurate. I have read that a english longbow could reach 300 yards- now THAT is a longbow!


Actually there isnt such a thing as a english longbow it originated in wales. so technically its the Welsh longbow i should know i'm welsh and i have 2 of them.If anyone wants to see any picture let me know? :-)

"the welsh longbow originated in wales in the 12th century and was used in later centuries by the english after they witnessed its amazing power During the numerous skirmishes between those two nations"



http://www.archers.org/longbow.htm
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