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Jeffrey Faulk




Location: Georgia
Joined: 01 Jan 2011

Posts: 578

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jun, 2015 2:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Niels Just Rasmussen wrote:


You are right about the prohibition against any pagan sacrificial meat to idols in both Judaism and Christianity.

Christians don't uphold Jewish laws about clean and unclean animals for normal everyday human consumption, based on Jesus words that it's not what comes into your mouth that makes you unclean, but what comes out.
I should have been more clear when I said "no prohibition in the bible" against horse-meat, and said New Testament OR the way Christians interpret the Bible. -> The New Pact superseding the Old Pact.


Point of order. While a Christian may eat anything without guilt, Paul does note that one should not violate conscience (one's own or another's) in doing so. He uses the specific example of food that had been offered in sacrifice. See First Corinthians. The implication is that it's probably best to not do so in general.
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Niels Just Rasmussen




Location: Nykøbing Falster, Denmark
Joined: 03 Sep 2014

Spotlight topics: 15
Posts: 822

PostPosted: Thu 25 Jun, 2015 4:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeffrey Faulk wrote:

Point of order. While a Christian may eat anything without guilt, Paul does note that one should not violate conscience (one's own or another's) in doing so. He uses the specific example of food that had been offered in sacrifice. See First Corinthians. The implication is that it's probably best to not do so in general.

Yeah correct:
1st Corinthians, Chapter 8: Paul stats that a Christian is not "unclean"/ "soiled" even if he does sacrificial meat ("food makes no difference towards God" Paul actually states), but that you should avoid to do so, as the practice could cause weaker people to fall from Christianity. So the prohibition is a social one - for the love of your brothers.

One thing I forgot was about possible music in the Bronze Age.
Finds of several bronze "Lurs" from Denmark - actually also often found in pairs - shows probable use in religious processional ceremonies. It's unknown if they were used in connections with armies.


Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b9/Bronse-Lurer-Danmark.png

Interestingly enough you also found some horns from the Iron Age (Gallehus Golden Horns - again a pair).
But it's unclear if they were musical instruments.
They were stolen in 1802 and melted into jewelry, but copies were made from drawings....

Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/74/Guldhornene.jpg

One of the horns had a runic inscription: "Ek HlewagastiR Holtijar horna tawido"
It shows that the a-umlaut are starting to take place as the a in “horna" has changed the vowel from Proto-Germanic "hurnaz" to horn- in North/West Germanic about 450-500 AD.

Translation. I "Famous-Guest of Holt" (Or "the Holting") horn made/inscribed.
Unclear if "tawido" is making the horn or just inscribing it with runes.
The composite name Hlewa-gastiR (Famous Guest) probably shows the person to be an aristocrat.

Hlewa- is cognate with Greek Kléos, both from Proto-Indoeuropean Klewo- (meaning Fame).
GastiR is cognate with Latin Hostis, both from Proto-Indoeuropean Ghostis (meaning "stranger")

NB: The modern English word "Host" is from Anglo-Saxon and the modern English Word "Guest" is from Danish (Gæst) and they originally meant the same. Meetings between Anglo-Saxons and Danes caused a specification of both words - so the Anglo-Saxon word became exclusively for those that receives strangers and the Danish word for the visiting stranger!
Quite interesting in fact. Probably arose in the Danelaw!

Point is that Hlewa-gastiR could in 450-500 AD perhaps both mean "Famous Guest" and "Famous-Host"!
Kings and Aristocrats were mobile in the Iron Age. So the "owner" (host) always arrived as a "guest" to one of his own halls. They had stewards (called "bryti" in the viking age), whom tended to its upkeep.
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Niels Just Rasmussen




Location: Nykøbing Falster, Denmark
Joined: 03 Sep 2014

Spotlight topics: 15
Posts: 822

PostPosted: Sat 18 Nov, 2017 2:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Niels Just Rasmussen wrote:
While visiting "Maribo Stiftsmuseum" I ran across a beautiful Early Bronze Age "Fuldgrebssværd" [Full-Hilted Sword], but sadly my phone was out of battery. Luckily the museum had an old postcard to I at least can show the fine hilt details.
I wasn't not able to see through the glass if there was a tang behind the semi-open hilt structure.

The Sword is from Røgbølle Sø (Lake) on Lolland [Lake offering], one of only 2 "Fuldgrebssværd" found on Lolland, and is of the Zealandic major grouping of Nordic Bronze Age Swords.


Found a big picture of the hilt details of the Røgbølle Sø sword.

Source: http://www.aabne-samlinger.dk/media/676925/PM_0917_kulturnat.jpg
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