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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,236

PostPosted: Thu 10 Feb, 2011 2:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There is some resemblance but then there are a lot of basket hilts which look very similar to each other. The heart and round piercings are quite common in basket hilts of different origins and you will note that the decorations on Adm. Oliphant's sword are more defined than those on your sword. And, the piercings line up better, at least on one of the guards.

I think that Karl may be correct when he ascribes this to an Indian producer. There are numerous shops in India producing very good copies of basket hilts and other swords - and some not so good. Since Karl says he saw very similar swords with Indian provenance at a show, we might want to lean in that direction.

I have attached a photo of one of my basket hilts which, although not marked, may have been made in India. I certainly did not pay a lot for it at the time. It is a very good copy right down to the proof disk in the blade. Where it fails - aside from the size of the basket - is the blade itself. It has a lot of etching but it looks much too worn to be legitimate, given the condition of the basket and sheath. One chap came up to me at Grandfather Mountain years ago and pronounced it a genuine antique.



 Attachment: 40.19 KB
1828 Broadsword I - Copy.JPG


Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Karl Schlesien





Joined: 15 Sep 2010

Posts: 54

PostPosted: Thu 10 Feb, 2011 3:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here are some interesting copies at this site.


http://www.themadpiper.com/swords.htm


Look to # SW 12, # SW 13, #SW 14.
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Mike W Grant




Location: UK, Exiled Scot in England
Joined: 06 Feb 2011

Posts: 48

PostPosted: Fri 11 Feb, 2011 3:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lyn, aye, I think you are correct, most likely a copy, I just can't see the crude markings being on anyones sword, even if it was just a bottom of the range one! But the niggle is that the Admirals sword also looks pretty crude, mind you that may be a fake too..... Eek!

This sword collecting is a nightmare, I may go for a good replica till I can afford a good original, anyone know the best replicas available at the correct price!?

Karl - love the Mad piper site - some nice repors but seem expensive!
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,236

PostPosted: Fri 11 Feb, 2011 3:42 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mike W Grant wrote:
Lyn, aye, I think you are correct, most likely a copy, I just can't see the crude markings being on anyones sword, even if it was just a bottom of the range one! But the niggle is that the Admirals sword also looks pretty crude, mind you that may be a fake too..... Eek!

This sword collecting is a nightmare, I may go for a good replica till I can afford a good original, anyone know the best replicas available at the correct price!?

Karl - love the Mad piper site - some nice repors but seem expensive!


Replicas are a good way to start and also the accumulation of literature on the subject of original swords. There are a number of good books available now and there will be more as time goes on.

You might try Armour Class in Scotland. They make some very nice swords. MacDonald Armoury is another source, also in Scotland.

The Mad Piper, AKA Donnie Shearer, has stop making swords for health reasons and now does repair and restoration only. He holds a hammerman's ticket, probably the only American who does, and his work is well worth the money. Vince Evans is also an excellent maker of basket hilts and there are several others whose names pop up from time to time on the forum. Castle Keep on the Isle of Skye is another source.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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