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Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Mon 19 May, 2014 11:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just got this seax from Ben Potter. It's got a 3-bar pattern-welded blade by Owen Bush, and the rest of the work is by Ben Potter.

A real beauty! He did a fantastic job at finishing this knife to my specifications. I am extremely pleased.

Edit: I think the website where I originally hosted the photos had some bandwidth issues, so I reloaded the photos to this site.







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Last edited by Harry Marinakis on Mon 19 May, 2014 7:35 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Carl W.




Location: usa
Joined: 07 Aug 2008

Posts: 159

PostPosted: Mon 19 May, 2014 6:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Harry - Hope its just my pc but nothing to see? If its not just me please repost the pics, I miss Ben's work, & a mix of his & Owen's...!! - Carl
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P Ullrich





Joined: 26 Apr 2013

Posts: 47

PostPosted: Wed 21 May, 2014 1:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great stuff on this thread. Here's one that I dont think I've placed here. Blade by Michael Pikula, the rest by me. Overall length 24", blade length 16.5". Width at base: 1.8". Thickness at base: 0.2", more like .25" towards the break. Width where the spine breaks: 1.7". Handle of old ash.


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Boris Bedrosov
Industry Professional



Location: Bourgas, Bulgaria
Joined: 06 Nov 2005

Posts: 700

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jun, 2014 5:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Three recently finished (in the end of May) langseaxes:





They share almost identical blades with close lengths, and equal widths and distal tapering. The main differences are in the tip areas and quite obviously - in the hilts.
For the future projects I definitely need narrower blades (36 - 38 mm instead of 40 as now) - then the hour-glass shape of the grips would be not such extreme. The other things I'm not quite pleased with, are the metal fittings of the scabbards, and particularly the rivets - this time I didn't managed to make them as I usually want.

* The Norwegian - my chopper for the events I participate in Big Grin







One particular reason I made the hilt in such manner was my desire to test a multi-layer construction - here I have steel-copper-bronze-copper-steel billet, all held together with rivets.



** The guard and the pommel of this one



have a historical analogue, kept in the Museum in Nijmegen, Netherlands.
The grip - core of an oak, brass, bone, bufallo horn - is, of course, purely fictional.





*** The last one with non-riveted construction



is fully product of my imagination - of course, as always, I've tried to make the things historically correct.
The guard and pommel are bronze, the grip - buffalo horn, brass, accacia, walnut.





Perhaps, I should try to cut the motif in the middle



in opposite manner - convex ropes and immersed surrounding area - but anyway the result is good for a first try.

The last two langseaxes are intended for sale.
So, if someone is interested in - please, send me a PM in order to provide more images and to discuss the details.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Kai Lawson




Location: Madison, WI
Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Likes: 7 pages

Posts: 506

PostPosted: Sun 15 Jun, 2014 8:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Love the variety, Boris. I quite like the stacked construction seax, and the gentle hourglass grip!

Also really diggin' your admitted fantasy-but-functional looking seax: the world needs more really good looking fantasy pieces

"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
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Karl Edgar





Joined: 21 Mar 2011

Posts: 15

PostPosted: Sat 21 Jun, 2014 10:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Blunted seax for reenactment fighting.
Oak, deer antler and leather in the handle. Made by me.

Blade based on Bjäärs 17 (Gotland, Sweden, 7th century) and made by TC. Its a realy nice blade, but a bit on the heavy side.






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D. Bell




Location: New Zealand
Joined: 01 May 2004

Posts: 73

PostPosted: Sat 12 Jul, 2014 4:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have recently received my latest seax, made by Ryan Stevens, and thought this would be a good time to show off some of my collection.


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Small Seaxes.jpg
Top: Ryan Stevens, overall length: 23.6 cm. Crape Myrtle and African Blackwood handle
Bottom: George Ezell, overall length: 20.8 cm. Laurel burl Handle


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Medium Seaxs.jpg
Top: Petr Florianek, overall length: 41 cm. The hilt is Boxwood, carved in the 9th century trewhiddle style
Bottom: Antoine Marçal, overall length: 32.4 cm. Maple burl handle


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Group.jpg
Top: Owen Bush blade, Walnut hilt by me, overall length: 62.3 cm.

An armed society is a polite society.
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Matias Tonazzi




Location: Buenos Aires
Joined: 13 Jul 2014

Posts: 9

PostPosted: Sun 13 Jul, 2014 10:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've made this one for myself and don't actually use it for reenactment, but when I go camping. It's a rather crude work recycling an old machete I've found once. The blade is 25cm long.


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Lance Morris




Location: NYC
Joined: 17 Aug 2013
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 181

PostPosted: Sun 13 Jul, 2014 8:31 pm    Post subject: Tinker Seax         Reply with quote

Hello gents,

you guys have some sexy seax's.

I particularly like Robert Muse from the made dwarf.

Here is my humble tinker.

The picture doesn't do this justice.

Does anyone know the style or Aprrox time period for this blade?



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John Hardy




Location: Saskatoon SK Canada
Joined: 31 May 2014
Likes: 18 pages

Posts: 99

PostPosted: Mon 14 Jul, 2014 1:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matias Tonazzi wrote:
I've made this one for myself and don't actually use it for reenactment, but when I go camping. It's a rather crude work recycling an old machete I've found once. The blade is 25cm long.




I like that one. I expect it's a lot like 90%+ of the original seaxes - which is the reason you are willing actually to use it the way those unsung originals were. The ones with the fancy carved handles, inlaid blades and finely tooled scabbards were most likely status ornaments for the chiefs and champions (or princes and noble lords, depending on area and era). On the other hand, the common 'Saxon in the field' probably used something a lot more like what you have there. (And actually used it for all his daily tasks for years and years until it was completely worn out and the remnants were recycled into something else, rather than treating it like an heirloom status symbol.)

Much like the guys nowadays buy fancy custom $1,000 pocket knives or hunting knives with damascus blades and inlay on the handles, which are then kept unused in display cases. Meanwhile the knife they actually use is a generic Victorinox Swiss Army Knife that gets carried every day in a sweaty pocket full of keys and lint, and when they need a fixed blade a $20 Tramontina machete and $60 Kabar hunting knife get beat to death on the farm, at the cabin, or in the hunting camp...

The only thing you have 'wrong' in your setup - from a historical perspective - is that your sheath is 'upside down'. Seaxes were normally carried cutting-edge upwards - even though that seems to place them upside down in the hand when drawn. I suppose that drawback was overshadowed by the fact that carrying the seax blade up both preserved the blade's sharpness a little better as the cutting edge wasn't rubbing against the leather all the time and also let the sheath last a little longer for the same reason.

Note: One thing I have wondered - in old-school American Bowie-knife fighting styles, one technique was to hold the knife in the hand with the main cutting-edge upwards. The idea was that while chops and slashes could still be done backhanded inward-sweeping motion , if a primary low thrusting attack hit home, the knife could then be yanked upwards in a disembowelling cut.

Since the seax was usually carried edge upwards in the scabbard even when carried by a warrior as an off-hand secondary weapon, does anyone know if this technique was also practiced in seax fighting? Or was the usual practice to 'cock the hand' when drawing and sheathing the blade so it ended up 'edge downwards' when out?
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Matias Tonazzi




Location: Buenos Aires
Joined: 13 Jul 2014

Posts: 9

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jul, 2014 5:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the praise onto the saex itself, and truth be told, I've only noticed the sheat issue after you've mentioned it. Since I don't use it for reenactment, I guess I'll only make a new "correct" one once this one is worn out, but when this happens, the next one will surely have the sharp edge facing upwards.

As for fighting, I've never used it, even less with a shield (have only used sword and axes), but that technique kind of makes sense. I did had some training with smaller knives, and on a figthing stance I do grab 'em with the sharp edge pointing outwards, but the blade is also on a backward angle, so I can also punch with that hand and if grabbed, it's harder to twist it so they can make me stab myself (like we see in many movies)
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Robert Muse




Location: Washington
Joined: 28 Sep 2009
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Posts: 473

PostPosted: Mon 15 Sep, 2014 1:06 pm    Post subject: seax         Reply with quote

I haven't posted here for some time, but have these to show.

1. A Wolf Tooth pattern by George Ezell based off of one displayed in the Irish National Museum



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Robert Muse




Location: Washington
Joined: 28 Sep 2009
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PostPosted: Mon 15 Sep, 2014 1:09 pm    Post subject: Seax         Reply with quote

And last, but not least this one by Lech Budaj an artist best known for Japanese swords


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Elliot R.





Joined: 03 Jun 2013
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Posts: 9

PostPosted: Mon 15 Sep, 2014 11:33 pm    Post subject: Seax         Reply with quote

Here's my latest acquisition, which is a broken back seax made by Matthew Parkinson of Dragon's Breath forge. According to Matthew, the blade is a 4-bar composite of 1084 and 15n20: the edge is initially a 27-layer twist, with another 9-layer twist flanking it, a second 9-layer twist, and a third 9-layer twist on the edge again. He also carved Huginn and Muninn into the handle, as well as Odin's face on the back. It's got a beefy 9.75-inch blade, and is 14 inches in overall length.





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Morgan M




Location: Arizona
Joined: 24 Sep 2014

Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun 28 Sep, 2014 11:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bought a Jaeger seax last year and made a sheath for it:

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Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Thu 05 Feb, 2015 1:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

From George Ezell

Top: 3-1/2 in blade
Bottom: 8 inch blade - 16 inches long overall



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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Likes: 32 pages

Posts: 724

PostPosted: Thu 05 Feb, 2015 3:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Those look great Harry. I love George Ezell's work and hope to get one from him this year.

At this point you should do a group photo. That Bush/Potter one is awesome, and two more makers I hope to have works from someday.
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Christopher Gregg




Location: Louisville, KY
Joined: 14 Nov 2007
Reading list: 2 books

Posts: 666

PostPosted: Fri 06 Feb, 2015 9:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is my seax, made for me by a friend. Blade is 12" and has intertwined snakes engraved, handle is stained oak with interlace carving and brass pommel cap and ferrule, sheath is hardened leather with dragon motif, sheath has brass mounts.


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Christopher Gregg

'S Rioghal Mo Dhream!
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Fri 06 Feb, 2015 11:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
Here is my seax, made for me by a friend.


Well I wish your friend was my friend too! That's a nice piece. I like the snakes and the leather sheath looks good too. However, the handle shape and length is not what I'm used to (although I am not an expert by any means.) Was this design something you wanted, something he had found, or what?
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Christopher Gregg




Location: Louisville, KY
Joined: 14 Nov 2007
Reading list: 2 books

Posts: 666

PostPosted: Fri 06 Feb, 2015 11:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J. Nicolaysen wrote:
Quote:
Here is my seax, made for me by a friend.


Well I wish your friend was my friend too! That's a nice piece. I like the snakes and the leather sheath looks good too. However, the handle shape and length is not what I'm used to (although I am not an expert by any means.) Was this design something you wanted, something he had found, or what?


It was partially completed when I asked if I could buy it. I added the snakes, dragons on the sheath, and the brass disk on the pommel. I know it's not 100% historical (or IS it?), but it feels good in the hand, and looks smashing!

Christopher Gregg

'S Rioghal Mo Dhream!
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