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GG Osborne





Joined: 21 Mar 2006

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Posts: 487

PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 11:29 am    Post subject: Show Us Your Firearms         Reply with quote

There are already major threads for harnesses, shields, ebay finds, etc., so I thought it was time to expand a bit into the area of firearms since they too are part of "myArmoury." My idea with this thread is to provide a place we can share pictures and comments for our firearms collections from the beginning of black powder to the introduction of cartridge weapons. I think anything past 1865 may get a bit too problematic...but that's just my prediliction.

So I'm floating the balloon to see if there is enough interest out there to give it a go. If you guys think it's a worth while effort, I'll start by posting some pictures of my recent Scottish steel pistols from Carriage House and the Pitcairn retroduction.

Want to give it a go? Question

"Those who live by the sword...will usually die with a huge, unpaid credit card balance!"
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Chuck Russell




Location: WV
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 12:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

while i would love to do this, I'm not so keen on the at large public seeing what guns I do have in case of people casing people for robberies etc.
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 12:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like the idea so here is my 17th c. Scottish rifle with converted snaphaunce lock. The barrel is rifled in .50 caliber. The stock is shaped in the "Scottish National Style" with the appropriate flutes. The trigger guard is similar to the one found on the "Breadalbane Gun" which is the oldest known Scottish long gun. The gun was built by Steve Krolick of Wisconsin. I have one other Krolick piece, which I will post later.


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Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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David Teague




Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Joined: 25 Jan 2004

Posts: 409

PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 12:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lin Robinson wrote:
I like the idea so here is my 17th c. Scottish rifle with converted snaphaunce lock. The barrel is rifled in .50 caliber. The stock is shaped in the "Scottish National Style" with the appropriate flutes. The trigger guard is similar to the one found on the "Breadalbane Gun" which is the oldest known Scottish long gun. The gun was built by Steve Krolick of Wisconsin. I have one other Krolick piece, which I will post later.


Hell Yes! Big Grin Beautiful piece, Lin.

I've always wanted a true Scottish style long gun, but have had to settle for English style smoothbores up to date.

I understand Chuck's concern, but I'll admit to having access to a number of match, flint, percussion, BP paper and metalic firearms, both custom and production. A few pics might show up later this weekend.

Cheers,

David

This you shall know, that all things have length and measure.

Free Scholar/ Instructor Selohaar Fechtschule
The Historic Recrudescence Guild

"Yea though I walk through the valley of death, I will fear no evil: for Thou's sword art is with me; Thy poleaxe and Thy quarterstaff they comfort me."
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 1:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chuck Russell wrote:
while i would love to do this, I'm not so keen on the at large public seeing what guns I do have in case of people casing people for robberies etc.


Me neither Chuck but I will roll the dice on this one. Everything is very secure.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Chuck Russell




Location: WV
Joined: 17 Aug 2004
Reading list: 46 books

Posts: 936

PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 1:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

ya i guess you guys are right. i mean its not like we're sharing serial numbers etc.

swords i worry less about, my guns ehhhhh hehehee.i got 1 picture I'll share

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Phil Crawley




Location: Auld Reekie- Capital village o'Jockland
Joined: 12 Dec 2007

Posts: 42

PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 1:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

My new baby-
1734 repro Fusil de Chasse

-- Angels also carry weapons --
http://www.blackboarswordsmanship.co.uk/
http://www.blackboarswordsmanship.co.uk/symposium.html
http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/PhilCrawley
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Reece Nelson




Location: Overland Park KS
Joined: 18 Oct 2007
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 1:50 pm    Post subject: firearms         Reply with quote

hahaha! Now that's some home defense! @Chuck
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 2:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Show Us Your Firearms         Reply with quote

GG Osborne wrote:
There are already major threads for harnesses, shields, ebay finds, etc., so I thought it was time to expand a bit into the area of firearms since they too are part of "myArmoury." My idea with this thread is to provide a place we can share pictures and comments for our firearms collections from the beginning of black powder to the introduction of cartridge weapons. I think anything past 1865 may get a bit too problematic...but that's just my prediliction.

So I'm floating the balloon to see if there is enough interest out there to give it a go. If you guys think it's a worth while effort, I'll start by posting some pictures of my recent Scottish steel pistols from Carriage House and the Pitcairn retroduction.

Want to give it a go? Question


Post those photos already!

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Chris Lampe




Location: United States
Joined: 07 Mar 2005

Posts: 211

PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 6:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've got several firearms I could post but the only one that has any historical value or is special to me is my 1943 Springfield Armory M1 Garand rifle. This rifle was made in November of 1943, went to Europe sometime after that, was given or loaned to Denmark after WWII and was then given back to the U.S. government in the 1990's. It made it's way to the Civilian Marksmanship Program where it was sold to the private citizen I purchased it from. What makes the rifle special for me is that it still has the original November 1943 barrel, which is relatively rare, and I purchased it to commemorate an important event.

Some day I will ship it to a professional restorer for new wood, re-parkerizing and complete tune-up on the internals. It will look like a brand new rifle.

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Chuck Russell




Location: WV
Joined: 17 Aug 2004
Reading list: 46 books

Posts: 936

PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 7:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chris Lampe wrote:
I've got several firearms I could post but the only one that has any historical value or is special to me is my 1943 Springfield Armory M1 Garand rifle. This rifle was made in November of 1943, went to Europe sometime after that, was given or loaned to Denmark after WWII and was then given back to the U.S. government in the 1990's. It made it's way to the Civilian Marksmanship Program where it was sold to the private citizen I purchased it from. What makes the rifle special for me is that it still has the original November 1943 barrel, which is relatively rare, and I purchased it to commemorate an important event.

Some day I will ship it to a professional restorer for new wood, re-parkerizing and complete tune-up on the internals. It will look like a brand new rifle.


that's a beauty! I've got a 41 Winchester. but alas the stock, barrel and trigger group are not matching.
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GG Osborne





Joined: 21 Mar 2006

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PostPosted: Sat 17 Jul, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's a really nice fusil, Phil. Who made it and was it patterned after an original?

Also, for you Chuck...I'd sure hate to meet that kid in a dark alley...oh, wait a minute, you probably mean that stovepipe standing next to him, don't you??

"Those who live by the sword...will usually die with a huge, unpaid credit card balance!"
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Chris Lampe




Location: United States
Joined: 07 Mar 2005

Posts: 211

PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul, 2010 5:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chuck Russell wrote:
Chris Lampe wrote:
I've got several firearms I could post but the only one that has any historical value or is special to me is my 1943 Springfield Armory M1 Garand rifle. This rifle was made in November of 1943, went to Europe sometime after that, was given or loaned to Denmark after WWII and was then given back to the U.S. government in the 1990's. It made it's way to the Civilian Marksmanship Program where it was sold to the private citizen I purchased it from. What makes the rifle special for me is that it still has the original November 1943 barrel, which is relatively rare, and I purchased it to commemorate an important event.

Some day I will ship it to a professional restorer for new wood, re-parkerizing and complete tune-up on the internals. It will look like a brand new rifle.


that's a beauty! I've got a 41 Winchester. but alas the stock, barrel and trigger group are not matching.


That's pretty common for these surplus Garands. The only two parts on mine that I'm confident are original are the receiver and the barrel. There are several other parts that could, based on numbers, be original to the rifle but the odds are against it. I felt lucky just to get the WWII barrel and extremely lucky that it still shoots very well.
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
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PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul, 2010 6:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Almost all surplus Garands, and M1 carbines as well, are arsenal rebuilds. Rifles with all matching serial numbers can be found but they are very expensive and most are in the realm of collectibles, meaning they should not be fired, which would lessen their value. After WWII, when many of these rifles were put into storage, they were first overhauled at the arsenal and replacement parts were pulled from whatever bin was handy, which accounts for all the mis-matches. These guns were used and abused by GIs all over the world and to be safe for use in future conflicts they had to be rebuilt. They were also fired with corrosive-primed ammo, which ate up the barrel throats unless cleaned thoroughly. Some of the nicer rifles available in recent times were brought back from Korea in the early 90s. I was fortunate enough to get one and it is like a new rifle, except for the mis-matched numbers and the stock, which has a large replacement piece in the toe. They are great shooters.
Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul, 2010 1:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just to keep things moving, here is a photo of the lock area of my other Scottish rifle. Like the first one I posted, this rifle has a modified snaphaunce lock, retaining the original battery with a pan cover welded on. The pan cover has been removed and all holes filled. The gun maker produced the lock plate, hammer, battery and fence. The internal workings all came from a Siler lock, meaning that replacement parts are easily found. This rifle was also made by Steve Krolick and represents a Scottish long gun from about 1650 which was later restocked by someone familiar with the French/Dutch school of stock making. I do not have good photos of the complete gun but will post some when I can. Here also is the top of the barrel where the maker put his initials. The decorative line runs the complete length of the barrel and is perfectly straight, which gives you an idea of the quality of this piece. It is also .50 caliber and rifled.


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Scot Rifle II 001.jpg


Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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MB Tharp




Location: IN
Joined: 02 Feb 2008

Posts: 15

PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul, 2010 2:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I recently had this made. It uses several different elements of period 17th Century guns. It is roughly a 1660 era gun, that was used to replace the match locks by the french and french allies(natives) in new France.
http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y45/ditmurier/Ganondagan/Musket/


You can't take the Sky from Me!
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David Teague




Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Joined: 25 Jan 2004

Posts: 409

PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul, 2010 3:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

MB Tharp wrote:
I recently had this made. It uses several different elements of period 17th Century guns. It is roughly a 1660 era gun, that was used to replace the match locks by the french and french allies(natives) in new France.
http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y45/ditmurier/Ganondagan/Musket/



Postage stamp size photos are a cruel joke... we want to SEE your new smoothbore. Confused

This you shall know, that all things have length and measure.

Free Scholar/ Instructor Selohaar Fechtschule
The Historic Recrudescence Guild

"Yea though I walk through the valley of death, I will fear no evil: for Thou's sword art is with me; Thy poleaxe and Thy quarterstaff they comfort me."
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David Teague




Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Joined: 25 Jan 2004

Posts: 409

PostPosted: Sun 18 Jul, 2010 4:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello All,

My smoothbore flintlocks are all hard to get to right now... WTF?!

But here is just a couple of my firearms... I do live fire with everything I own. i.e powder and projectile.

Late 15th century match lock







Circa 1812 Jacob Hawkens style full stock rifle (before his brother Samuel came out to join him), built in 1979.









Cheers,

DT

This you shall know, that all things have length and measure.

Free Scholar/ Instructor Selohaar Fechtschule
The Historic Recrudescence Guild

"Yea though I walk through the valley of death, I will fear no evil: for Thou's sword art is with me; Thy poleaxe and Thy quarterstaff they comfort me."
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Andreas Auer




Location: Innsbruck, Tirol, Austria, Europe
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PostPosted: Mon 19 Jul, 2010 2:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that Matchlock David...

Here is mine 14th century Tannenbergbüchse.


and me firing...



Andreas

The secret is,
to keep that pointy end thingy away from you...
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Sat 24 Jul, 2010 5:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is a photo of one of my Scottish rifles that, unfortunately, is not the clearest but it does give you an idea of the overall architecture of the piece. This rifle represents one made in Scotland in the mid-17th c. then brought to America where it was at some point restocked in the French style. The lock area appears above. I need to make some better photos for myself and when I do I will post them here.


 Attachment: 64.96 KB
Scot Rifle II 005.jpg


Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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