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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
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PostPosted: Fri 20 Feb, 2009 10:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would have a tough time deciding between an Albion Crecy or their Knight model. I believe that I would end up choosing the Knight because it can be used hand and a half (somewhat cramped), but it is a versatile one hander as well.

I would not want to have a premium custom sword that is so ornate that I would relegate it to a wall (never getting to use it.)

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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D. Bell




Location: New Zealand
Joined: 01 May 2004

Posts: 73

PostPosted: Mon 23 Feb, 2009 7:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If I was only picking from swords I already own then the Albion Oakeshott would be an easy choice - I love the handling, the blade has a very interesting look to it, and although the hilt furniture isn't exciting I think it gives the sword a classic early medieval look that I like. That said I've only been collecting swords for a few years, and there's so much more I want to get and try out. To pick one design now and say "This is the one sword I want the most" isn't something I can do yet.
An armed society is a polite society.
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Jared B




Location: Montana, USA
Joined: 14 Feb 2009

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PostPosted: Mon 23 Feb, 2009 7:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, hmmm. Only one sword. So far I can only come up with a damascus steel katana with a daimond edge. Cant think of any specifics for the design. I'm planning on getting into forging swords as soon as I get the equipment for it, and have alot of ideas for designs. Most of my ideas are probably not authentic to history, but hopefully they will look nice one day.
My favorite swords are katanas and gladii. The katana because it is such a quick and efficient killer in the hands of the skilled samurai, and the gladius because of how it's design was perfect for the Roman military machine. Cant wait to make some of this stuff!

Can be found on romanarmytalk.com/rat as Nihonius Legio
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Ed Toton




Location: Northern VA
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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb, 2009 7:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd have a very difficult time choosing as well, especially when you consider that many of them have varying niches.

Of the ones I own, one of my favorites in terms of handling is the Albion Landgraf, though it's not as optimal for cutting as some of the others. The Albion Baron, on the other hand, is one of the cornerstones of my collection, as it's one of the best cutters and I had it customized with a grip and scabbard from Christian Fletcher.

And if I were thinking in terms of a single-hand sword instead of a longsword, well, that complicates things further. Right now my Albion Chevalier is at the top of that category.

So who knows... I really can't choose. Happy

-Ed T. Toton III
ed.toton.org | ModernChivalry.org
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Darrin Hughes




Location: England
Joined: 22 Jun 2007
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PostPosted: Tue 24 Feb, 2009 9:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is a nasty one, which is why I thought I'd give it a while before joining in, but I would have to go with a type XVIII like my A&A Henry V or Albion's Kingmaker. The blade has a bit of width and holds a good edge for cutting and the point is good and stout for thrusting. The hollow-grind helps to make it really fast as well. Like Jean said a bit of a jack-of-all-trades. However I would sacrifice the extra reach and choose this over a hand-and-a-half sword because I'm really not keen on longswords and would prefer to have a buckler in the other hand.
It's a shame that the Henry V is such an ugly little bugger otherwise it would be perfect. I sometimes look at mine and wonder why I keep it, but then I pick it up and remember, nothing else feels as good in the hand as far as I'm concerned so a type XVIII it is.

Cheers,
Darrin.
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Adam Simmonds




Location: Henley-on-Thames
Joined: 10 Jun 2006

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb, 2009 12:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

this question is easy for me to answer, as i do only own a single sword. it is an original 17th century european baskethilt from north italy with a german blade, still sharp through the centuries. i am more than satisfied with this piece and feel no desire to add to my collection.

i surmise that perhaps possesing a single sword heightens the relative value of that piece as it attains a 'one and only status' relative to oneself. perhaps analogous to having one or several women, the more one possesses simultaneously, the less time and regard one may commit towards any single one.
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Christopher Ron Covington





Joined: 07 Jul 2004

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb, 2009 6:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello all,

Oh what a horrible day if I were only allowed to pick one sword to have the rest of my life. Since this is all make-believe (I hope!) I'll give a few possible make-believe answers. Each answer would depend on why I could only have one sword and whether or not it has to be something I already own or would just really fancy.

Worst case: post-apocalypse. I've survived the chainsaw matches in the Thunder Dome (two men enter, one man leaves), and I need my sword to save my life. I'd say I would want a well made katana. I have an Ogawa Kanekuni (shodai) that needs some polishing and a new koshirae. I also have an early Hanwei Shinto katana I use for budo. Either would be fine (assuming I could get the Kanekuni fixed up). It would make the most sense for me because I study Jikishinkage-ryu kenjutsu and have some understanding of how to use a Japanese sword. Some of my other swords, a tulwar for example, I have little understanding on how to use.

If it is a sword I own and it is simply to pass on to posterity I would say my ElJay basket-hilt. It is the only custom work I own. The basket is awsome and it is attached to an antique blade. ElJay does top knotch work. Since most swords I own are either antique or production they don't really feel like they are mine. It seems like I am a caretaker for the antiques and I am just keeping them in shape to pass them on. The production sword I own (Hanwei Shinto see, above) feels like it is a machette I got off the rack at Walmart. It does the job but has no life. Its hand made, but not for me. Anyone here could have gotten the exact sword, had they ordered a few minutes before me. Nothing worth passing on to the kids. The ElJay was made for me. I doubt ElJay would have made the weapon the way I asked him to on his own, out of the blue, to sell to someone.

If it is a modern living maker and I don't already own an example I would say a Vince Evans basket hilt would be great. I love Vince's baskets. He is another top knotch smith out there. If I had the money I'd love to pick up one of his swords right now. I would also love anything by anyone in the Osaka Gassan school. The ayasugi does it for me for some odd reason.

As for antique swords there is a huge list a mile long. If you were to give me any one I think I'd be happy only owning one sword the rest of my life.

Christopher R. Covington
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Tony Brass





Joined: 15 Oct 2006

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PostPosted: Wed 25 Feb, 2009 10:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Not that easy. A month ago, I would have said my Jody Sansom katana, both because it is the best looking sword I have ever owned (Jody was truly an artist, one of a kind), and because I cannot imagine any sword feeling more effective in my hands. It feels as though I could hack through an army.

But now the question is more complicated. I recently purchased a Rick Barrett fantasy piece off the myArmoury classified from Jeff Young. WOW!! Sentiment aside, this sword has that one of a kind artistry. For the first time I feel the way I imagine Arthur felt about Excalibur, or Aragorn felt about the re-forged Narsil. The balance, durablity, look and feel, create that illusion of invincibility when this sword is held. That sense that the sword is organic, and alive.

But this brings up an issue. I am not a sword fighter. I am not trained in any way to fight with a sword. These swords feel to me like I imagine a sword should feel to win a fight. Is the feel of a sword in the hand of an untrained person meaningful? Or would a real sword fighter say "Oh this is the type of balance and feel that attracts a novice, but a real sword fighter knows that a sword should really feel like this."
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Steve Burgess





Joined: 28 Sep 2008

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PostPosted: Thu 26 Feb, 2009 5:47 am    Post subject: Re: If you could only own one sword...         Reply with quote

Justin King wrote:
It seems like this topic must have been discussed but I was unable to turn up anything using searches, so...

If you could only have one sword, original or repro, what would it be, and is it already in your collection? Or perhaps just an inspiration/idea for a custom piece that you would like to have made someday?
For many, myself included, this may take some serious thought and a good deal of time to answer. The question is painful for me to even contemplate, much less answer (how materialistic is that???) and I am frankly unable to make up my mind, or even narrow it down with any lasting conviction, which is why I am curious to hear from anyone else who cares to answer.

If this has been discussed in another thread I apologize and would appreciate a polite point in the right direction.


I have eight swords but if I had to pick one to be thrown back in time with, like a sword that I would trust with my life it would have to be the one my wife bought me last christmas, a Solingen from Albion. Big Grin

The value of a noble person can be determined by the honourable company he keeps.
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Steve Burgess





Joined: 28 Sep 2008

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PostPosted: Thu 26 Feb, 2009 6:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tony Brass wrote:
Not that easy. A month ago, I would have said my Jody Sansom katana, both because it is the best looking sword I have ever owned (Jody was truly an artist, one of a kind), and because I cannot imagine any sword feeling more effective in my hands. It feels as though I could hack through an army.

But now the question is more complicated. I recently purchased a Rick Barrett fantasy piece off the myArmoury classified from Jeff Young. WOW!! Sentiment aside, this sword has that one of a kind artistry. For the first time I feel the way I imagine Arthur felt about Excalibur, or Aragorn felt about the re-forged Narsil. The balance, durablity, look and feel, create that illusion of invincibility when this sword is held. That sense that the sword is organic, and alive.

But this brings up an issue. I am not a sword fighter. I am not trained in any way to fight with a sword. These swords feel to me like I imagine a sword should feel to win a fight. Is the feel of a sword in the hand of an untrained person meaningful? Or would a real sword fighter say "Oh this is the type of balance and feel that attracts a novice, but a real sword fighter knows that a sword should really feel like this."


Hi Tony, I was caught by your statement and felt the need to say something.
I write heroic fantasy. I've been a ghost writer for a number of years and fairly shortly I'm hoping to see something of mine with my own name on the cover. I also served as a Royal Marines Commando with some time served with UKSF so I can easily describe a pretty dark scene of what gore and guts should look like. I can only say that when I write a battle scene the sword is always depicted as a thing of sheer excellence and profound beauty before the slaughter ensues, and ultimately a tool of butchery once the action is underway. I agree, there is something almost spiritual about lifting a fine blade that cannot be descibed in words alone, although I am apt to believe that a great swordsman is not taught to be great, as I also believe that it is a great sword that brings out the great swordsman from within. Wink

The value of a noble person can be determined by the honourable company he keeps.
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Jean-Carle Hudon




Location: Montreal,Canada
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PostPosted: Thu 26 Feb, 2009 3:04 pm    Post subject: one sword         Reply with quote

In choosing from my own collection, I would go with my schiavonna from Cervenka. I love the way it handles, you have the precision of the rapier, the protection of a basket hilt cut & thrust and just enough blade presence to make it as versatile a weapon to hope for , whatever the setting. Any second choices allowed??
Bon coeur et bon bras
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Dante G. Mercurio




Location: Rockville, Maryland
Joined: 23 Feb 2009

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PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 6:31 am    Post subject: One Sword         Reply with quote

I am lucky enough to have the one sword I could have already in my collection----the Roman short sword ( the sword that conqured the world ). My prized one is from Ablion.
Greg Mercurio
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Jeremiah Swanger




Location: Hershey, PA
Joined: 20 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 12:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I guess the only way to answer this question is to pose a hypothetical situation-- like, say, a restriction on swords reminiscent of the restrictions on firearms imposed by some countries, where each owner is only allowed one (hence the popularity of conversion kits that can accommodate different calibers overseas).

My personal favorite style of sword is Type XVIIIb in the Oakeshott Typology. Something about the long, slender, gothic lines of this family of swords simply speaks to me.

Who would make it?

--I'd certainly take a look at Peter Johnsson, for one. There are also some gentlemen in the USA, Germany, and Poland, whom I would consider as well...

What would I look for in the blade?

--I'd certainly be looking for something compatible with the German schools of fence. Due to my not-insubstantial stature, the sword itself would probably be on the larger end of the historical spectrum for this type. I'm thinking something between 39" and 41" from the cross to the tip, but this is fairly subjective. So, too, would be some of the features of the blade itself. While a long, gradual taper is a given, I would be open to a width of close to 2 inches, making it close to the size of a two-hander, sort of like A&A's infamous GBS, a powerful War Sword. It would need decent rigidity to aid in tip placement, so I would be open to the suggestion of a raised and hollow-ground spine, or a short ricasso at the base of the blade.

What about the hilt?

-- I would like to stay within historical parameters regarding grip length. 10" or so sounds about right. While a wheel pommel seems to have been more common in this type of sword, I would like to go with a faceted-fig shape, with a Cross Potent at the peen. An S-curved guard is a definite must-- while round or flat seems to be the common choices, I would like to go with an octagonal cross-section, to reflect the facets in the pommel, then terminating in clubbed ends. The same would go for the pair of side rings attached to the cross, again, a la GBS. For grip cover, I think I would go with a wire half-wrap above a black tooled-leather wrap-- nothing as fancy as the Bayerisches XVIIIb, but simple and elegant-- a recent sword of Peter Johnsson's comes to mind, but I can't find the thread...

"Rhaegar fought nobly.
Rhaegar fought valiantly.
Rhaegar fought honorably.
And Rhaegar died."

- G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire
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Dan P




Location: Massachusetts, USA
Joined: 28 Jun 2007

Posts: 208

PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 1:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremiah Swanger wrote:
I guess the only way to answer this question is to pose a hypothetical situation-- like, say, a restriction on swords reminiscent of the restrictions on firearms imposed by some countries, where each owner is only allowed one (hence the popularity of conversion kits that can accommodate different calibers overseas).


Easy solution suggested by the firearm analogy: Get one really high quality blade of one's preferred style and get lots of different swappable hilt fittings! For the record I'll take a sidesword blade.

Or, different blades for the same hilt. But that's maybe less fun. Without extra rapier and swept-hilts what would I use for bookends in my office?
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Addison C. de Lisle




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 1:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would have to say the Vorpal Blade by Peter Johnsson. Failing that, the Svante. Happy
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Paul Watson




Location: Upper Hutt, New Zealand
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 2:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremiah, search the forums under makers & maufacturers, specify peter johnsson as the author and Solingen in the title. This will find you your sword.
I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, but that which it protects. (Faramir, The Two Towers)


Last edited by Paul Watson on Fri 27 Feb, 2009 4:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Li Jin




Location: NYC
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 3:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would want the Del Tin Flameberg, but is expensive, about 600 dollars.
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Jeremiah Swanger




Location: Hershey, PA
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Feb, 2009 7:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Paul Watson wrote:
Jeremiah, search the forums under makers & maufacturers, specify peter johnsson as the author and Solingen in the title. This will find you your sword.


Thanks Paul!

This is the one I'm talking about!

"Rhaegar fought nobly.
Rhaegar fought valiantly.
Rhaegar fought honorably.
And Rhaegar died."

- G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire
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G K Pfingsten




Location: Washington
Joined: 07 May 2009

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PostPosted: Sat 13 Jun, 2009 8:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If I had to choose a custom, it would be Jake Powning's Vardhllokur - Spirit Song.

If it were a production sword, it would be the Albion Valkyrja.

If my life depended on it, well I wouldn't use a sword if my life depended on it, but if it was absolutely mandatory, it would be the Albion Mercenary.
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Chris Artman




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PostPosted: Sat 13 Jun, 2009 8:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Out of all of the ones I own currently, it would be the SVANTE. Simply because it feels the most natural. The Blade and the proportions are outstanding... It would be the one I would want in my hand if for some reason I had to fight with a sword.


Quote:

Wow. That's a tough call. It would come down to my Albion Svante or Bugei Lion Dog. In the end I'd probably go with the Svante, though.

If we're talking about a choice of one sword that isn't already in my collection, I'd trade both of the aforementioned blades in a heartbeat for Peter Johnsson's Vorpal sword from the Masters of Fire exhibition .



Agreed on all counts. By the way, my Lion dog has not arrived yet. The latest due date from Bugei is end of June...

I could not agree further with Sam's post. I think Peter's VORPAL sword from the Masters of Fire exhibition is my favorite creation: it is my perfect sword of all time...

I wonder where I am in the cue from Patrick Barta... I wonder if it is still a 3 year wait or if it has changed... I got on the list about a year ago now I think...
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