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Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Show Us Your homemade blades (and other projects)!DIY Project Reply to topic
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Jorge Actis




Location: Brasil
Joined: 06 Jun 2010

Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun 06 Jun, 2010 4:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Naythan Goron wrote:
nice sword Allen
i'm working on one myself

you can see the full page on how its made and the stats here
http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=16959


Naythan Goron'm from Brazil do not speak your language I'm translating the text rsssssssss wish that you please pass me the measurements of thickness, width and size of this type of sword templars'm thankful because I am starting a project if possible by email my email actis.jorge @ gmail.com
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Ruel A. Macaraeg





Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 306

PostPosted: Sun 06 Jun, 2010 10:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I cut a tang into the base of this stingray spine cast and fit it into a hilt to make this Malay poison dagger, 19-20thc. Cf. Gimlette 1971:126-7, Ghiringhelli 2007:34.

http://ForensicFashion.com/1831PattaniRebel.html

http://ForensicFashion.com/CostumeStudies.html
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J. Dawes
Industry Professional



Location: Sheffield/Nottingham Midlands
Joined: 07 Jun 2010

Posts: 27

PostPosted: Tue 08 Jun, 2010 2:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

When i first started out i used to visit the local steel works in my area, they are usually really appreciative of other local metal working enthusiasts and gave me a really good deal in buying there off cuts off them.
But old junk yards and scrap heaps, hunting leaf springs off land rovers is always going to be the best steel!
Or industrial bandsaw blades that the saw mills were throwing out after snapping them. today i keep them for spring catches on my work.
Though no matter what steel it is its pracitcly useless without a proffesional temper to it.
For swords i go for about rockwell C 43- 45 and knives i go rockwell C 50 - 55.

A little secret of mine i used to use high speed (tensile steel) about 3 mm to make my own knives with when i was about 11. it doesnt need tempering its keeps a shaving sharp edge but it is very brittle. Jus keeping a 3 inch blade shaped like a mellowed out kukri was my dream knife. it lasted easily 4 years until i lost it in the woods. i was gutted as it was my first 'useful' knife that worked.


Josef.
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Dave Leppo




Location: Dover, PA, USA
Joined: 24 Feb 2010

Posts: 38

PostPosted: Tue 08 Jun, 2010 4:17 am    Post subject: a few         Reply with quote

I'm a lurker here, and not a combatant, but I dabble in bladesmithing.
I mostly post such work @ professor Fogg's site:

http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showt...l=frankish seax&fromsearch=1

http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=16993

-Dave
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Ozsváth Árpád-István




Location: Romania
Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posts: 131

PostPosted: Tue 24 Aug, 2010 12:42 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here's my "Raven":

Total length 97 cm
Blade length 80 cm
Grip length 11,5 cm
Blade with at base 44 mm
Blade thickness 7 mm tapering to 3.5 mm
CoG 12 cm from guard
CoP 54 cm from guaRD
Weight 1,2 kg

It needs some finishing touches, but I couldn't wait...



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Richard B. Price




Location: Providence, RI
Joined: 06 Feb 2011
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sun 20 Feb, 2011 7:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

HI all thought I'd throw my two coppers in.


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my take on a keris. [ Download ]

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the first knife I ever completed [ Download ]

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a really big flanged mace i am working on. [ Download ]

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just a chainmail whip [ Download ]

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tsuba and habaki of the katana I did [ Download ]

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the kissaki [ Download ]

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the whole thing [ Download ]

"We shall never know lasting peace until the last king has been strangled with the entrails of the last priest."
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Aleksei Sosnovski





Joined: 04 Mar 2008

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Fri 18 Mar, 2011 1:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Finally got a friend of mine take pictures of my arms and armor. There are a lot of them, but for now I will post photos of hilts that I have made. Blades are:

- Hanwei medieval practical
- Hanwei Tinker line bastard sword (blunt)
- Hanwei practical longsword
- Two-handed gothic sword by Jiri Krondak

The smaller swords are well-balanced and agile training weapons, I am very satisfied with all of them. The two-handed one is 155 cm long monster that weighs almost 3 kg. Definitely not the fastest weapon out there, especially for a small guy like met though the weight itself is perfectly OK for a sword of that length. I am thinking of regrinding the blade and modifying the pommel to make the sword lighter.



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Aleksei Sosnovski





Joined: 04 Mar 2008

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Mon 21 Mar, 2011 6:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The second post on my self-made stuff. A fingered gauntlet made just for the fun of it. Offers little protection since there in virtually no padding, but does not restrict movement at all. Good for light practice where you do not expect to get hit but can still catch an occasional blow. On the photos I bend my hand as much as I can. I could bend it more if I did not clench my fist, the gauntlet permits more movement.

You might notice that I was not trying to replicate any particular style. All my armor so far has been optimized for performance since first of all I fight in it and modern reenactment/WMA is in many aspects different from medieval tourney or battlefield and second I still have a long way to go to consider myself a master armorer so I try to make many different objects using different techniques rather then make a faithful replica of a single one.

Any comments are welcome, especially technical advices on how to make next gauntlet better.



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Aleksei Sosnovski





Joined: 04 Mar 2008

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Mon 28 Mar, 2011 4:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some more blades, this time entirely self-made. Cutlass and cut-and-thrust sword are sharp, messer is a blunt. Unfortunately neither of these can be called very good since

- cut-and-thrust has no distal taper. While it is light, has a good balance and can deliver a pretty nasty cut, it would be much better if the blade was thinner and wider at the point. Or, if it had a longer blade, it could become a good rapier. Unfortunately my possibilities were limited by the size and shape of steel I had (this blade was made by stock removal).

- cutlass has too little distal taper and therefore is rather heavy for its size. The blade was also made by stock removal.

- messer is point-heavy and overall weight of around 1.2 kg is probably too much for such weapon. But it was intended to be that way from the very beginning because I needed a relatively short blade that could deliver a powerful cut to use as a side arm in reenactment events when my primary weapon is something two-handed. All metal parts were forged.



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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Tue 29 Mar, 2011 9:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well I made this viking axe out of a cheap brand modern wide bladed axe, a large hickory handle + a couple of hours...



Black parts are oil burnt with linseed oil. The axe is very sharp and retains a high edge hardening after careful stock removal with cooling. The ugly bit at the top was me slipping with the sledgehammer during wedging. Seems to have caused no structural problems within the axe handle as it cuts wood and metal nicely so i've let it be.

The original was found in Skċne, but there's also a very similar axe fond in Norway.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Einar Drĝnnesund





Joined: 14 Sep 2003
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 200

PostPosted: Tue 29 Mar, 2011 10:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, so much cool stuff on this thread. Heres my contribution, some axes I made. All done with welding and stock removal. No forging, unless you count heating up the eye part and bending it. Razz They are all made of mild steel, no heat treatment.










(the last one is upside down)


And just for fun, the first axe I ever made, back when I was 17 and had no clue what a real battle axe would be like. Heavily inspired by Conan and roleplaying games, its made of 10 mm steel, with 30 mm thick solid steel haft. It weighs in at a whopping 20 lbs.



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Mackenzie Cosens




Location: Vancouver Canada
Joined: 08 Aug 2007

Posts: 238

PostPosted: Wed 30 Mar, 2011 2:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I been wanting to raise a helmet for a while so after I picked up Patrick Thaden Raising a Sallet http://talbotsfineaccessories.com/books/metalwork.html I thought that I would give it a try.It is still in progress and is too large a circumference to historically correct, but should do OK for my new WMA sparing helmet.

16gauge mild steel
heat source MAPP gas ( next time a acetylene set up or a forge)
lots of hammering

mackenzie



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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Likes: 50 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,208

PostPosted: Wed 30 Mar, 2011 8:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Never tried this myself but it looks geometrically symmetrical and pretty good for a first attempt. Big Grin Cool

Maybe some of our armorers could give you some constructive feedback and as for size I guess it's difficult to estimate what size sheet of steel will give the right sized bowl ?

Well next time you may end up using too small a sheet and maybe the third attempt will be perfect ?

I guess there may be patterns out there to take some of the guesswork out of it, but good to see this project.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Aleksei Sosnovski





Joined: 04 Mar 2008

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Thu 31 Mar, 2011 12:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't think that circumference depends much on the size of the sheet. Well, if the sheet is too small then of course you can't make the helmet big enough. But if the sheet is too large then you simply make the helmet deeper and then cut off the excess. Or cut off some metal in the middle of raising process. So it's better to start off with a large sheet.
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Aaron Morris




Location: pueblo,colorado
Joined: 03 May 2009

Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu 31 Mar, 2011 9:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

here's a flanged mace I've made recently


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Colt Reeves





Joined: 09 Mar 2009

Posts: 466

PostPosted: Thu 31 Mar, 2011 10:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Those big old washers?
"Tears are for the craven, prayers are for the clown.
Halters for the silly neck that cannot keep a crown.
As my loss is grievous, so my hope is small.
For Iron, Cold Iron, must be master of men all..."
-Cold Iron, Rudyard Kipling
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Aaron Morris




Location: pueblo,colorado
Joined: 03 May 2009

Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu 31 Mar, 2011 11:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

yeah, there 3.25 inch diameter dock washers
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Mackenzie Cosens




Location: Vancouver Canada
Joined: 08 Aug 2007

Posts: 238

PostPosted: Thu 31 Mar, 2011 11:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Never tried this myself but it looks geometrically symmetrical and pretty good for a first attempt. Big Grin Cool

Maybe some of our armorers could give you some constructive feedback and as for size I guess it's difficult to estimate what size sheet of steel will give the right sized bowl ?

Well next time you may end up using too small a sheet and maybe the third attempt will be perfect ?

I guess there may be patterns out there to take some of the guesswork out of it, but good to see this project.


I think that Aleksei is correct. If you look at some of the later historic bascinets they look to be made from a single sheet of iron alloy raised to cover from top of the head to almost the shoulders.

Raising gives you the ability move the metal around, thinning it in some places and thickening others. In my half finished pot, circumference at the bottom is smaller then the circumference of the sheet I started with because I tried to pull the metal back to the peak is some places & push and bend the metal to center void.

I guess I should stop being lazy and keep heating and hammering until I get what I want. Happy
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Likes: 50 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,208

PostPosted: Thu 31 Mar, 2011 6:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Aleksei Sosnovski wrote:
I But if the sheet is too large then you simply make the helmet deeper and then cut off the excess. Or cut off some metal in the middle of raising process. So it's better to start off with a large sheet.


Makes sense to me. Wink Big Grin Cool

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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William M




Location: Buckinghamshire , England
Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 263

PostPosted: Fri 08 Apr, 2011 12:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here are my two blades that I made while on Owen Bush's excellent knife making course!

Top one is a seax with a hamon the bottom one is a Wharncliffe style blade.
As I would not have enough time to do filework while on the course, we made sure that the tang would be soft enough to file.
I am very happy with how they are turning out so far, next up is to extend the filework into the blade as far as I can, then make grips and scales for both.



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