Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search


myArmoury.com is now completely member-supported. Please contribute to our efforts with a donation. Your donations will go towards updating our site, modernizing it, and keeping it viable long-term.
Last 10 Donors: Daniel Parry, Anonymous, Daniel Sullivan, Matthew Milito, Sean Flynt, Jean Thibodeau, Gossart Pierre, Craig Johnson, Dan Howard, Jeff Cierniak (View All Donors)

Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > 18th/19th century sword repro makers? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Viliam Fiedler




Location: Czech Republic
Joined: 26 Mar 2020

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Mon 29 Mar, 2021 11:33 pm    Post subject: 18th/19th century sword repro makers?         Reply with quote

Hello everyone,

I'm currently trying (and failing) to find a high-quality maker that specializes or at least has experience with 18th/19th century swords/sabres. Mostly of British and French origin. At the moment, specifically the "Wilkinson pattern", so British 1845P.

The reason is simple, I've been collecting antiques for some time now and I'm looking for sharp and functional repros to accompany my original pieces in order to use for test cutting practice.

Most of my replicas are of swords from the middle ages, so I know good makers working with that era but not many focusing on younger swords.

I've been wondering whether someone here knows someone? Ideally someone that can ship sharpened and is located in EU.

Here are bigger makers I already tried contacting:

Pooley's - they mostly focus on ceremonial stuff
WKC - similar to Pooley's + their e-mail address just doesn't work
Cold Steel - not providing the types I'm interested in
Windlass - a possibility but I haven't heard good things about them in the past, at least when it comes to medieval stuff

I've also tried to look around local makers here in Czech republic but no luck.

Will appreciate any help you can provide Happy

Thanks!
View user's profile Send private message
Adam Simmonds





Joined: 10 Jun 2006

Posts: 160

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 1:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Viliam,

Depending on the type of test cutting you want to do, you're probably best off sticking with original antiques. As I'm sure you know these are still available in perfectly functional condition - certainly the 1845P you mention.

Reproductions of comparable quality do not exist as far as I'm aware, probably because they would cost significantly more to produce than antiques sell for.

A
View user's profile Send private message
Ian Hutchison




Location: Louisiana / Nordrhein-Westholland
Joined: 27 Nov 2007

Posts: 599

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 2:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Viliam,

Jindřich Figura has experience with sabers in general. At the moment he is making me a copy of a British line officer's sword of the early 19th century.

You might also check with Nielo Swords, also in Czechia.

'We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.' - Adrian Carton de Wiart
View user's profile Send private message
Viliam Fiedler




Location: Czech Republic
Joined: 26 Mar 2020

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 11:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey guys,
Thanks for the answers Happy

Adam Simmonds wrote:
Hi Viliam,

Depending on the type of test cutting you want to do, you're probably best off sticking with original antiques. As I'm sure you know these are still available in perfectly functional condition - certainly the 1845P you mention.

Reproductions of comparable quality do not exist as far as I'm aware, probably because they would cost significantly more to produce than antiques sell for.

A


The issue is, the piece I have is an infantry officer's and I don't think it was ever sharpened aside from some basic edge. Another thing is that since it's a Wilkinson I know the owner and have a bit of a bio of his, so it holds additional value because of it.

And the topic of sharpening an antique is of course a bit of a heresy to most collectors I know. Though I won't say I wasn't tempted. Nothing would ever compare to cutting with an original I think.

Ian Hutchison wrote:

Hi Viliam,

Jindřich Figura has experience with sabers in general. At the moment he is making me a copy of a British line officer's sword of the early 19th century.

You might also check with Nielo Swords, also in Czechia.


Thanks, I'll try to contact Figura, I know of him, just wasn't aware that he does younger swords too.

When it comes to Nielo Sword, I've heard about them too but I don't know anyone that owns anything made by them which I considered quite weird. I assumed that they do better looking wall hangers but I would be glad to find out the opposite. It is possible that I don't know them simply because they focus more on the international market.

V.[/quote]
View user's profile Send private message
T. Kew




Location: London, UK
Joined: 21 Apr 2012

Posts: 223

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 1:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The problem with the market for 18th/19th century repros is that there are too many originals still floating around. With medieval swords, there are relatively few and most of them are in pretty poor condition, so most collectors are really only able to pick up reproductions. By contrast, when you're looking at sword patterns which were mass produced for grand armies, there are just so many that it's hard for a good swordsmith to make a living in the business. Once you're past the bottom end of the market, like Windlass and Cold Steel, it's generally possible to buy a real antique.
HEMA fencer and coach, New Cross Historical Fencing
View user's profile Send private message
Adam Simmonds





Joined: 10 Jun 2006

Posts: 160

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 2:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Viliam Fiedler wrote:

The issue is, the piece I have is an infantry officer's and I don't think it was ever sharpened aside from some basic edge. Another thing is that since it's a Wilkinson I know the owner and have a bit of a bio of his, so it holds additional value because of it.

And the topic of sharpening an antique is of course a bit of a heresy to most collectors I know. Though I won't say I wasn't tempted. Nothing would ever compare to cutting with an original I think.
V.


Hi Viliam,

To be clear I wasn't suggesting that you should necessarily use whatever you currently own for test cutting, I was just suggesting that obtaining an antique for the job might in fact be more practical than finding a suitable reproduction.


T. Kew wrote:

The problem with the market for 18th/19th century repros is that there are too many originals still floating around.


This seems a good problem to have and is one that I am glad persists!
View user's profile Send private message
Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Likes: 50 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,278

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 6:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Viliam, you might want to get in contact with Matt Easton since one of his businesses is buying and selling swords and he does buy and sell original European 18th & 19th century period swords of the period you are looking at.

He might be able to find a specific sword you are looking for, or suggest one that he has in stock for sale, or one he could try to find for you.

He might be able to find a " using " antique that is not so pristine in condition, already service sharpened in period or later, so not a collectable that should be just displayed and not used in any way that might make it lose it's historical value ?

Such a sword could be re-sharpened if not as sharp as you want without it devaluing it as an antique.
I would still avoid any abusive testing, but if the sword and sword guard and handle are structurally sound, you could do test cutting on appropriate targets.

Links to his site(s): The first being his Antique sales site.

https://www.antique-swords.co.uk

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt14YOvYhd5FCGCwcjhrOdA

Wed site Home Page: https://www.matt-easton.co.uk

Hope that this is helpful. Big Grin

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
View user's profile Send private message
Viliam Fiedler




Location: Czech Republic
Joined: 26 Mar 2020

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue 30 Mar, 2021 11:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Obtaining a cheaper antique with an edge that could be used for this haven't occurred to me, so thanks for the idea Happy

I do know Matt as I already have one cavalry sword from him, so I'll try contacting him regarding this in the near future. Thanks for the tips
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > 18th/19th century sword repro makers?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2021 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum