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Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Gothic scabbard fittings? Reply to topic
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Hass Fernen





Joined: 05 Feb 2019

Posts: 35

PostPosted: Mon 11 Mar, 2019 9:42 am    Post subject: Gothic scabbard fittings?         Reply with quote

Hello, I am in the process of designing a scabbard to commission. And I need inspiration for gothic scabbard fittings and belt fittings.

Also was enamel work every done one belt fittings for this time period?

I don't have any ideas for belt fittings right now other than wanting enamelling. Any ideas would be appreciated.


I included some pictures of what I have in mind so far and was wondering whether they would be historically accurate and fit the design. Would these work together or no?

Also for the images included in the design for the throat of the scabbard are those maple leaf motifs on the throat design 1 image or some type of other leaf?


*note: for the chape design, I intend to make the transition from a square to a point more gradual (taper it, instead of the abrupt angle)



Images included:
Throat design 1
Throat design 2
Text style for sword raingard writing
Design for top of chape
Mid hanger design
Tooling design on scabbard

Thank you



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Tooling design on scabbard

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Mid hanger design

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SP0285.jpg
Top of chape and writing on rainguard for sword

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Throat design 1

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SP0298.jpg
Throat design 2

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SP0274 2.jpg
chape design
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Michael Zimmermann





Joined: 19 Dec 2018

Posts: 24

PostPosted: Mon 11 Mar, 2019 4:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's not an extant piece, but the next best thing:

https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/bartolome-bermejo-saint-michael-triumphs-over-the-devil

Throat, hanger and chape all show Gothic tracery. Come to think of it, Tod offers a full set of similar parts, which looks quite nice.

Re: the enamel: as far as I am aware silverwire cloisonné was employed at the beginning of the 15th century to decorate the so-called Kurschwert's scabbard (and pommel?) now in Dresden. Cf. attachment.

I assume other enamel techniques were used, too, and earlier, of course.



 Attachment: 113.74 KB
Kurschwert scabbard [ Download ]

- Michael
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Hass Fernen





Joined: 05 Feb 2019

Posts: 35

PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar, 2019 7:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Zimmermann wrote:
It's not an extant piece, but the next best thing:

https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/bartolome-bermejo-saint-michael-triumphs-over-the-devil

Throat, hanger and chape all show Gothic tracery. Come to think of it, Tod offers a full set of similar parts, which looks quite nice.

Re: the enamel: as far as I am aware silverwire cloisonné was employed at the beginning of the 15th century to decorate the so-called Kurschwert's scabbard (and pommel?) now in Dresden. Cf. attachment.

I assume other enamel techniques were used, too, and earlier, of course.


Oh man that is gorgeous with the green felt. Thank for this.

Ah I have seen Tod's work, and it really is nice. You mean this one right? https://todcutler.com/collections/sword-chapes/products/scabbard-set-5

I did not know that this piece used cloisonné technique. Thanks for this, gives me the go ahead for the belt fittings then.

I appreciate it.
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Michael Zimmermann





Joined: 19 Dec 2018

Posts: 24

PostPosted: Tue 12 Mar, 2019 9:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, it is rather snazzy.

That's the one.

Indeed. Curious construction, too: Wooden core, velvet cover and then twelve metal locket pieces from throat to chape, hinged on one side & locked on the other, on top.
If I've whetted your appetite, there's more in the catalogue of the Sigismund exhibition from earlier in the century, p. 279-283:

http://opac.regesta-imperii.de/lang_de/anzeig...;pk=949555

Glad to have been helpful.

- Michael
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Hass Fernen





Joined: 05 Feb 2019

Posts: 35

PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar, 2019 1:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Zimmermann wrote:
Yes, it is rather snazzy.

That's the one.

Indeed. Curious construction, too: Wooden core, velvet cover and then twelve metal locket pieces from throat to chape, hinged on one side & locked on the other, on top.
If I've whetted your appetite, there's more in the catalogue of the Sigismund exhibition from earlier in the century, p. 279-283:

http://opac.regesta-imperii.de/lang_de/anzeig...;pk=949555

Glad to have been helpful.


Haha, I said felt instead of velvet, wanted to correct it but completely forgot.

http://opac.regesta-imperii.de/lang_de/anzeig...pk=1058584

Does this link lead to a catalogue of pictures? Or is this a resource for more into on the aforementioned pieces.

Thank you
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Michael Zimmermann





Joined: 19 Dec 2018

Posts: 24

PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar, 2019 2:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, who knows what kind of fabric the textile cover is supposed to be...

No, as far as I am aware this catalogue (plus the essays written on the occasion of the exhibit) are not available online.

Regesta imperii is a resource for medieval historians. They chart the sources, which document the activities of medieval Roman kings and emperors from the Carolingians to Maximilian I.
The link leads to the online bibliography, which niftily enough provides not just correct citations for all manner of publications, but also lists the contents of things like Sammelbände & Festschriften &c.

- Michael
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Hass Fernen





Joined: 05 Feb 2019

Posts: 35

PostPosted: Fri 15 Mar, 2019 1:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Zimmermann wrote:
Well, who knows what kind of fabric the textile cover is supposed to be...

No, as far as I am aware this catalogue (plus the essays written on the occasion of the exhibit) are not available online.

Regesta imperii is a resource for medieval historians. They chart the sources, which document the activities of medieval Roman kings and emperors from the Carolingians to Maximilian I.
The link leads to the online bibliography, which niftily enough provides not just correct citations for all manner of publications, but also lists the contents of things like Sammelbände & Festschriften &c.


haha that is true.

Ah darn. But this source is actually pretty helpful, will give me great lead to find more info. I'm sure I could get some of these publications from my university (at least I hope).

Thanks again.
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