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Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
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PostPosted: Mon 30 Jan, 2017 7:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sorry....I just couldn't think of 'sterling' at the moment. But, having held one, that particular basket is quite small. But then, I have fairly large hands. If the liner were removed, I'm sure it would seem bigger. Happy ......McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Mon 30 Jan, 2017 7:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

OK...

The Hanwei backsword has a basket that has been identified as probably an English hilt. I don't have an opinion on that issue except to say that I have never seen a Scottish basket hilt displaying anything similar to the "wee beestie" which is on that particular Hanwei sword. That certainly includes Stirling Hilts. I have one of the backswords, so I do know what you are referring to but could not ID it from your comment. That particular hilt is definitely not a Stirling hilt sword, most of which were made by the Allans and their journeymen and are well-documented and not hard to identify. The other Hanwei offering is more of a Glasgow style hilt and the basket is larger.

I agree that the basket on that particular sword is smaller than most repro baskets sold today. However, I am fortunate enough to own two Donnie Shearer made basket hilts, one of them a beak nosed ribbon hilt, the other an "S" hilt, and an Armour Class "S" hilt. In the case of all of those swords, the size is far closer to that of the originals, as is the overall configuration, than the Hanwei backsword, the basket of which is much bigger than an original.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Mark Moore




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PostPosted: Mon 30 Jan, 2017 8:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sorry about any confusion, Lin. Old age...fewer functioning neurons...What else can I say? Laughing Out Loud Laughing Out Loud .....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Mon 30 Jan, 2017 9:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

No apology needed. I understand the reduction in functioning neurons. Mine are dropping like flies.
Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

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PostPosted: Tue 31 Jan, 2017 11:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark Moore wrote:
Who said anything about 'low-end'? Wink

Well, I did. Can't really justify spending big bucks on a weapon right now, though I'm not unwilling to wait. But I plan to sell off my Hanwei side-sword, which should net about enough for one of these infantry swords, and, honestly, that's the kind of design that appeals to me.
Lin Robinson wrote:
Some swords were sent to Scotland by the French. So far as I know, there was no description of what they were in the records.

My (scant) findings are pretty much in agreement... There are claims around the Web that the straight-bladed epee du soldat with finger rings was the most common or even issued en masse, but I haven't seen documentation.
Lin Robinson wrote:
Swords were not all that plentiful in the Jacobite army and one would expect that the officers of the Clan Regiments/ tacksmen, who could afford to buy them, would be the ones carrying them.

Understood. But were these not the same individuals who carried fancy targes? Happy
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Mark Moore




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PostPosted: Tue 31 Jan, 2017 12:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You might wanna re-think selling off that side-sword. Those are pretty hard to come by these days! I already own one, or I would help you out. Wink Big Grin ........McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Wed 01 Feb, 2017 5:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan D'Silva wrote:
Mark Moore wrote:
Who said anything about 'low-end'? Wink

Well, I did. Can't really justify spending big bucks on a weapon right now, though I'm not unwilling to wait. But I plan to sell off my Hanwei side-sword, which should net about enough for one of these infantry swords, and, honestly, that's the kind of design that appeals to me.
Lin Robinson wrote:
Some swords were sent to Scotland by the French. So far as I know, there was no description of what they were in the records.

My (scant) findings are pretty much in agreement... There are claims around the Web that the straight-bladed epee du soldat with finger rings was the most common or even issued en masse, but I haven't seen documentation.
Lin Robinson wrote:
Swords were not all that plentiful in the Jacobite army and one would expect that the officers of the Clan Regiments/ tacksmen, who could afford to buy them, would be the ones carrying them.

Understood. But were these not the same individuals who carried fancy targes? Happy


Sorry Dan but I don't understand the point you are trying to make.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Dan D'Silva





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PostPosted: Thu 02 Feb, 2017 8:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I mean, if you have such a high-status item as a heavily decorated targe, you might as well have a sword to go with it, right?
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Fri 03 Feb, 2017 7:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan D'Silva wrote:
I mean, if you have such a high-status item as a heavily decorated targe, you might as well have a sword to go with it, right?


Without a sword you do not need a targe at all.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Dan D'Silva





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PostPosted: Fri 03 Feb, 2017 11:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Then I should definitely get one!
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Dan D'Silva





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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jul, 2018 6:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here we go!


Eight-ounce facing stained with Fiebing's cheap water-based variety and finished with acrylic... water-hardened, which resulted in the facing shrinking and bowing the whole shield a bit, handmade bosses set with escutcheon pins, and glued two-ply poplar core.


Lambskin back over quilted wool pillow, grips set with brass staples. Tacks and buckle from Crazy Crow Trading Post.

If I had the opportunity to do it over, I'd try to find a more period-appropriate finish, skip the water-hardening, glue the facing with hide glue, make the bosses smaller with more room for pin tabs (the middle one is as large as I could make it with the small pieces of brass on hand), sharpen the tips of the staples and hook them into the front of the core like clinched nails, and find a lightweight veg-tan for the back.
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Mark Moore




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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jul, 2018 7:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Superb effort on that! Bravo! I love the padding on the back, and your leather-work is exquisite. That's a keeper!.....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Dan D'Silva





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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jul, 2018 8:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you.
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Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jul, 2018 9:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Currently working on a shield project myself. Made the face from 3/4" ply, and have the leather glued and fitted. The center boss is a deep-dish GDFB 14ga. Center-grip handle, with a forearm strap and leather-covered arm padding, with a Manilla rope wrap around the circumference. Ought to be a beast. Big Grin .....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Dan D'Silva





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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jul, 2018 9:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Interesting. Is this going to be like a Migration period shield?

3/4-inch ply will be very sturdy indeed...
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Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
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PostPosted: Mon 23 Jul, 2018 3:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't really give it any 'period', Migration or other. I'm just taking it as it comes off the top of my head. I call it my 'Mini-Viking/Mega-Buckler' shield. Will probably do some Nordic-style artwork on the face, along with steel tacks. I'm building it to be an all-out combat-ready piece for maximum performance, even though it will probably never see shield-to-steel contact. Laughing Out Loud .....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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