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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Sun 01 Oct, 2006 2:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd like to invite other members who own EB Erickson pieces to post photos of their swords and I especially request that the photos be new just for this topic!

In other words, go take some glamour shots and share them!

Thanks!

Wink

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Bob Burns




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PostPosted: Sun 01 Oct, 2006 8:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am really taken in with Eljay Erickson's apparently unlimited talent, although this is something I will only be able to admire from a distance. The browned S baskethilt owned and browned by David Stokes is very interesting.
I especially like the particular fashion that Nathan arranged his baskethilts and schiavona in, with the sterling baskethilt previously owned by MAC as the focul point and arranging it so that the two wide crossguards are proximal to the centerpiece with of course the shorter crossguards at the distal corners.
The grouping is perfect and enhances the masterful work of Mr. Erickson to it's maximum enjoyment for viewing!

This is one hell of a piece of photography here!

Thanks!

Bob
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Sun 01 Oct, 2006 5:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bob Burns wrote:
The grouping is perfect and enhances the masterful work of Mr. Erickson to it's maximum enjoyment for viewing!

Thank you, Bob.

That's the first product photoshoot I've done in my new place. My old loft doubled as the perfect photo studio with its super high ceilings. I could shoot at night with studio lights or in the day utilizing the 20' tall windows that offered natural, diffused lighting. Now I'm in a shotgun Victorian (circa 1860) flat with much lower ceilings. I am not about to carry a bunch of swords to a real studio, so I have to make due here.

Your encouragement is golden.

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Bob Burns




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PostPosted: Sun 01 Oct, 2006 6:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You are most welcome Nathan. I am no photography expert, but I sure know talent when I see it and you are loaded with talent Nathan! I always wished I was artistically inclined, I have a cousin 15 years my senior who's had his art on some of the most prestigious art tours. When I was a toddler I thought he was the next thing to god! Laughing Out Loud By the way his knghts and vikings are incredible, he's done those since a kid.
Well, you know how it is, either you got it or you don't. I can't sing either, I sound like a buffalo in heat and guitar forget it, I sound like a chimpanzee on crack! Laughing Out Loud

Bob
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jul, 2008 7:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Who else received swords from EB Erickson this year?

Please share!

My 2008 Acquisition

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Ben Sweet




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PostPosted: Fri 01 Aug, 2008 3:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Sat 09 Aug, 2008 6:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey everybody-

Since I've added a new E.B. Erickson sword to my collection, I shot some new photos of all the EBE swords together.



Click photo to see full-sized version

Top to bottom:

E.B. Erickson SW11 Basket-hilt
This is an early form British basket-hilt identified as SW11 found in the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland. The antique, like many basket-hilts of the era, has had its quillons removed, likely to make it easier to carry and perhaps aid handling at the sacrifice of some versatility. I asked to have this replica created to show how the sword may have appeared as it left the cutler's shop, quillons in-tact. I'm impressed with the result. The blade is a custom-created one made by Del Tin.

E.B. Erickson Stirling hilt with Silver Inlay and Engraving
This magnificent piece was created for Thomas McDonald, who has recently come into circumstances requiring him to liquidate his own collection. It is based on an original sword (LA 22) by John Allan of Stirling, circa 1716 which can be seen in John Wallace, Scottish Swords & Dirks. The highly-detailed hilt is engraved and inlaid with silver, contrasting nicely with the blued steel. The final presentation is wonderful and really captures the feeling of original hilts. The back-blade is a highly-modified Del Tin blade with its wide fuller etched with the signature "ANDRIA FERARA", a nod to blades of the past.

E.B. Erickson Germanic Basket-hilt
This ia very unique "continental" basket-hilt. The construction methodology is very much like that of a schiavona, having each bar only attached to the cross and knuckle-bow. This piece was based on a few different swords, including an antique in EBE's own collection and another antique found at the Museum of Border Arms and Armour, Scotland. This hilt is mounted on a blade made by E.B. Erickson.

E.B. Erickson Germanic Basket-hilt
Another "continental" basket-hilt variety, this sword is a result of a collaborative effort between E.B. Erickson and Angus Trim. The sword is based on an antique in ElJay's own collection. This style of hilt was quite common and this replica is a good representation of the type. It has a tight wire-wrapped grip and long flaring quillons. The blade is a special ATrim back-blade designed for this hilt and roughly based on the original's design.

E.B. Erickson Katzbalger
This is my newest sword. It's a later-period landsknecht katzbalger-type sword. I wanted it to be of the complex-hilted variety as found in the very late 15th century and well into the 16th century. It's based mainly on two different swords, one in The Royal Armouries, Leeds, , IX.898, German, circa 1540-50 and one at The Dresden Historisches Museum, German, 16th century. The blade started out as a sword blade form Del Tin but has been highly modified by ElJay.

E.B. Erickson Schiavona
This is a new piece for me. I've only had it for a month or two. It has a Type 2 schiavona hilt and is modeled after an example in Oakeshott's European Weapons and Armour: From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution. It has a Del Tin blade with a wide fuller highly-modified by ElJay, giving this sword a lot of blade presence and wonderful handling properties.

More photos:









Click photos to see full-sized versions

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Gordon Frye




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PostPosted: Sat 09 Aug, 2008 10:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

SWEET! Nathan, as always, you have exquisite taste! Very, very nice.

BTW, pondering the Germanic Basket Hilt, I was looking at my own recently (the Barta piece which I got from you), and I can definitely see in it, as well as in the Erickson piece above, the distinct ancestry of the 18th Century "Walloon" swords with their lobed guard. Very interesting!

Again, a wonderful collection!

Cheers!

Gordon

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Thu 26 Mar, 2009 8:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi everyone-

I know there are others out there with swords made by EB Erickson and I want to see them!

I'm especially eager to see some of the things he's created over the last three years or so.

Even if you don't have photos available to post, throw out a note here and let us know what you have.

Thanks!

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Chris Arrington





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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 6:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is the first time I've seen this thread. All I can say Nathan is ..... WOW I love your swords Happy

We obviously have the same tastes!

My DT Schianova just came in last week from KOA.
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Kirk Lee Spencer




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 6:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey Nathan...

ElJay was kind enough to but together a beautiful recreation of the Chemsford hilt from the Can River.

I am currently beginning the decoration and finish work on it as I have time.

Vladimir Cervenka is making the blade for it. I hope to get it all finished and together sometime this summer.

Here are a few pics of the work in progress.

ks



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Two swords
Lit in Edenís flame
One of iron and one of ink
To place within a bloody hand
One of God or one of man
Our souls to one of
Two eternities
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Justin King
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 7:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have actually had this one since last summer but I don't think I ever posted pictures of it here, probably because I still don't have a decent blade to mount it on. The style is Scottish, from the 17th century, and is a bit simpler than the later, often heavily-decorated hilts of the 18th cent.


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E_B_hilt%20001%20%283%29.jpg

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 11:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you both for adding to this topic.

Justin-

That's one of my favorite types of Scottish basket-hilts. I tend to be drawn to the simpler designs, which is often why I like the earlier examples. What are you plans for a blade? There are so many choices for designs but so few easy options at getting them.

Kirk-

That looks great! Did you have ElJay create it "in the rough" so that you could do your own work on it? I've enjoyed seeing your own projects over the years and this will no doubt turn out excellent. What type of blade are you planning on having made by Cervenka?

It looks like you opted to get a more globular pommel as seen in the Bolling Hall, Bradford (175/25) hilt rather than the pommel found on the remains of the Chelmsford Museum sword. I think the two will make a great combination. I happen to be very fond of that type of hollow pommel and have wondered if the Chelmsford pommel is original to the hilt. It is corroded similarly so I suppose it is. I'm curious if you asked for this or if EBE chose that direction. I happen to also love the flattened quillons of the Chelmsford example.


I have recently acquired a hilt via trade and kindness similar in form that was likely based on the Bolling Hall sword (c. 1530-40). It was also made by EBE years ago. I will need to get a blade for it.

For the sake of diversity in my own collection, I'm leaning at a double-fullered backsword blade for this one similar to what can be seen in this other topic.

I've attached a quick snapshot of the hilt below. Note the large hollow pommel brazed via two halves and the robust balsa tang.



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EBE_Lowland_hilt.jpg
Hilt needing a blade made by EB Erickson

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Roger Hooper




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 12:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've shown this sword before (including my avatar) but not on this thread. In 2005 Eljay supplied Gus Trim with 3 hilts for which he created the blades. Nathan got one of them, and I got this English baskethilt. It doesn't have decoration or engraving, but is a masterpiece of form. I don't think any original antique English baskethilt can match it.

I wonder who bought the third hilt, a proto mortuary sword?



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Justin King
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 12:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:


Justin-

That's one of my favorite types of Scottish basket-hilts. I tend to be drawn to the simpler designs, which is often why I like the earlier examples. What are you plans for a blade? There are so many choices for designs but so few easy options at getting them.


I have a sort of a trade deal pending wherein I may get an ATrim 1541 blade bare. Depending on how it pairs up with the hilt I may mount it up, or modify it to suit, if possible. I would prefer a blade with a thickened and fullered ricasso but am not ready to have one custom made yet. I have had some success in the past modifying Del Tin blades, and I am always on the lookout for DT blades that have the right characteristics. I have the capability to do pretty heavy modifications to blades to make them right but these later blade styles are hard to replicate without the right starting point, which is usually not your typical medieval repro blade.
A couple of years ago I talked to Scott at Darkwood about having a double-fullered broadsword blade made with a thickened ricasso and the short flanking fullers running through it, and he gave me a reasonable quote so this is another option.
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 12:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roger Hooper wrote:
I wonder who bought the third hilt, a proto mortuary sword?


I've often wondered who got the third in that group, too!

Here are photos of it:


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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Mar, 2009 12:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Justin King wrote:
I have a sort of a trade deal pending wherein I may get an ATrim 1541 blade bare. Depending on how it pairs up with the hilt I may mount it up, or modify it to suit, if possible. I would prefer a blade with a thickened and fullered ricasso but am not ready to have one custom made yet. I have had some success in the past modifying Del Tin blades, and I am always on the lookout for DT blades that have the right characteristics. I have the capability to do pretty heavy modifications to blades to make them right but these later blade styles are hard to replicate without the right starting point, which is usually not your typical medieval repro blade.


Eljay himself has been going the modified Del Tin route over the last few years. In fact, my EBE Schiavona and EBE silver-inlaid basket-hilt are both mounted on modified DT blades.

Quote:
A couple of years ago I talked to Scott at Darkwood about having a double-fullered broadsword blade made with a thickened ricasso and the short flanking fullers running through it, and he gave me a reasonable quote so this is another option.


I'm going to have to look into this route, too. I'd like to get a few things I have mounted or modified and I'm looking for ways of doing it at a reasonable price given that I'm going to have to sell things off to pay for it. (I can't justify any new money for this hobby!)

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Kirk Lee Spencer




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Mar, 2009 9:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
Kirk-

That looks great! Did you have ElJay create it "in the rough" so that you could do your own work on it? I've enjoyed seeing your own projects over the years and this will no doubt turn out excellent. What type of blade are you planning on having made by Cervenka?

It looks like you opted to get a more globular pommel as seen in the Bolling Hall, Bradford (175/25) hilt rather than the pommel found on the remains of the Chelmsford Museum sword. I think the two will make a great combination. I happen to be very fond of that type of hollow pommel and have wondered if the Chelmsford pommel is original to the hilt. It is corroded similarly so I suppose it is. I'm curious if you asked for this or if EBE chose that direction....




Hi Nathan...

You're right, Eljay graciously agreed to literally "work with me" on this blade and put the basket together for me (something I cannot do) and allow me to do the decoration and finish work (something I can do... hopefully Worried )

I find that I am especially attracted to transitional forms... My Barta Fetter Lane sword is transitional between migration and viking styles. I really love the Sinclair hilts in thier transitional elements. Vlad Cervenka has made a fantastic Sinclair falchion for me.

And so... the Chemlsford hilt, as a transition between the swept hilt and the english basket forms, continued to catch my eye everytime I thumbed trough my copy of Mazansky. There are many more beautiful art pieces in Mazansky, but IMHO, none that had the energy and grace of the Chelmsford. I began to daydream about having a copy of it.

I was reading a thread on the forums one day and Eljay mentioned that he wanted to do a Chelmsford style hilt. I took that as my cue. I contacted Eljay and the rest is history.

Good spot on the pommel. You're exactly right. It's the Bolling Hall pommel. In speaking with Ejlay on the design, I wanted a different pommel and I thought that the forward part of the guard had been smashed in and orginallyy it allowed for the fore finger to extend through the front of the basket and under the forte of the blade. Eljay graciously agreed to make something similar to the Bolling Hall find. And in the end I will decorate it with the Bolling Hall as inspiration. Eljay showed me that it is very unlikely that the Chelmsford was designed to be able to stabilize the blade with the forefinger because the front of the outboard side of the basket would need to extend forward slightly to allow for the forward movement of the knuckles as the forefinger was extended. Just a slight modification... but a necessary one. I am happy to say that Eljay agreed to modify it to allow this (as a matter of fact I think he volunteered to do it... I am tempted to gush here... but I'll refrain.)

It is interesting to me that when you extend the forefinger through the front of the basket and curl it around the forte, the curvature of the crossing forward guard perfectly matches the line of the forefinger. So it seems to be designed to guard it from cuts.


So it is a slightly modified Chelmsford hilt.

As for the blade... It took me a long time to settle on a style. Because the basket is transitional, I thought about a transitional style blade but was not sure what that meant. I happened upon the image of a beautiful a swiss saber. I had never noticed the complexity of the blade. Then I searched for similar blades and found several that had the same geometry. It is almost as if the sword smith was trying to create a blade that was a backsword, saber and double edged blade all at the same time.

I drew up the plans and Vlad Cervenka agreed to take a "stab" at it for me. And so I am working in that direction this summer. I am taking photos as I go, and when it's finished I'll document the process in a thread here.

take care,

ks



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EBHquil.OvalFluted.L111bl95w40.ThR.SouthwarkBridge.RA.jpg
Found Southwark Bridge Thames River. Total Length 111cm. Blade Length 95cm Blade Width 40mm. Preserved in the Royal Armouries, Leeds

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Swiss Saber 1530. Preserved in the Wallace Collections. Image from Hermann Historica

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Bolling Hall Bradford

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Bolling Hall Bradford

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Chelmsford Sword 1540. Found in Can River Chelmsford. Preserved in the Chelmsford and Essex Museum, England

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Chelmsford Sword 1540. Found in Can River Chelmsford. Preserved in the Chelmsford and Essex Museum, England

Two swords
Lit in Edenís flame
One of iron and one of ink
To place within a bloody hand
One of God or one of man
Our souls to one of
Two eternities
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Justin King
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PostPosted: Sat 28 Mar, 2009 10:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I will be interested to see the Cervenka blade when it is done. By the descriptions I have read these later period broadsword blades were often very thin and flexible, and were also often fairly long, with a number of examples being 34-36" in the blade.
Peter Johnsson made a satement in reference to these types of blades in a thread about Albion's new Vigil- "In some ways this blade is akin to later period broad blades: something you might find mounted in a Scottish basket hilt or continental military sword of the 17th C. It has that lithe, flexible and acute quickness about it." -which immediately put me in mind of the blade on my Darkwood early English basket hilt. The blade began as a Del Tin 2146 which I cut down, re-ground and fullered. The blade was only 3/16" thick to start with so there isn't a whole lot of room to play with distal taper unless you are willing to get pretty thin. Once I figured this out and began to work within this mindset, I was able to achieve an interesting balance and feel with this sword, that Peter rather neatly put into words in that quote.
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Kirk Lee Spencer




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Mar, 2009 12:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Justin King wrote:
I will be interested to see the Cervenka blade when it is done. By the descriptions I have read these later period broadsword blades were often very thin and flexible, and were also often fairly long, with a number of examples being 34-36" in the blade...


Hi Justin...

I have attached a picture Vlad sent to me the other day. As with the basket, I will do some adjustments and finish on the blade also. For instance the transition between the forte fuller and the blade fuller will be connected. I wanted it this way, so that I can do the detail work.

As you say this blade is long and light. 91.5 cm (36 inches) and 625gm (1.4 lbs). Eljays basket is just under 1.5 lbs. So together it will be somewhere between between 2.5 and 3 lbs.

I am guessing it will have a transitional feel to it when its all together... somewhere between a broadsword and a rapier... what ever that might be like Eek! . (A pointy, backbalanced, agile broadsword or a rapier with a wicked cut in the forte and some extra mass on the back edge just at the COP.)


take care

ks



 Attachment: 149.92 KB
P3090001.jpg


Two swords
Lit in Edenís flame
One of iron and one of ink
To place within a bloody hand
One of God or one of man
Our souls to one of
Two eternities
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