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Craig Peters




PostPosted: Fri 04 Jul, 2008 3:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
Hi Craig,

Thanks for your reply. I have always known that I need a copy of this book but have never picked one up. Hopefully someone could post the pictures you speak of. Do you believe these "other than Danish axes" would have had similar length hafts.

THis is very intriguing to me. Seems like something I will "have" to have a commission of eventually. Any weapon of thee 12th c. is primo for me!

Also I would imagine that an axe of this type would have thereinforced edge shape we see on Danish examples- due to functuality and even more so due to construction. For me the ky is finding a smith who is comfortable with working with wrought iron as mild steel really doesn't look quite the same. I want iron on my commissions whenever I can get it.

Thanks,

Jeremy


Jeremy,

I can't say for certain about the haft lengths. However, if you look at the Hurstwic axe photographed, you'll notice that the haft is much smaller than most of the ones seen on reproduction Danish axes. Obviously, the haft on the Hurstwic axe is modern, but it had to be made to fit the eye of the original axehead. Therefore, I would suggest that if the Hurstwic axe is at all indicative of this axe type, then it would be fair to say that the hafts are significantly smaller than those found on the typical Danish axe. According to the webpage, the Hurstwic axe weighs an incredible 1.7 pounds. As far as I can tell, it must be an extremely agile type of axe.

By the way, before you purchase Arms and Armor of the Crusading Era, there are two things you should know. First, all of the images are line drawings, including the various historical weapons depicted. So there's no photos. Second, the vast majority of images are taken from period artwork in the form of carvings, manuscript illuminations, and various illustrations of this nature. A lot of people who buy this book are disappointed when they realize it wasn't quite what they expected. So you should know in advance what you're looking at before buying it. On the other hand, it gives you an almost unparalleled look at various weapons, both antiques and medieval illustrations, from throughout Europe.

I've attached the three line drawings of the various axes. Also included is a typical Danish axe (Figure 106) for the purposes of comparison.

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Craig Peters




PostPosted: Fri 04 Jul, 2008 3:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here's the Hurstwic Axe:



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Malcolm A




Location: Scotland, UK
Joined: 22 Mar 2005

Posts: 89

PostPosted: Sun 06 Jul, 2008 11:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello all esp SCott Kowalski
Think I finally got the picture problem sorted out
Here is a picture of the axe in the statue of Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn
Hope this is of some interest; I have other pics of the statue - if anyone wants them I can always email them to you.
Aplogies to Scott K for the delay in getting them done and posted



 Attachment: 83.89 KB
The Bruce's Axe.jpg
Statue at Bannockburn
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Scott Kowalski




Location: Oak Lawn, IL USA
Joined: 24 Nov 2006

Posts: 805

PostPosted: Sun 06 Jul, 2008 11:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you very much for getting the picture Malcolm! I appreciate it greatly.

Scott
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William R. Short




Location: New England
Joined: 14 May 2007

Posts: 24

PostPosted: Sun 06 Jul, 2008 5:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:


I wonder how other forumites feel about the accuracy of this site. Not to offend Danny- I just like to be sure especially with all of the interesting information!


I'm the person who maintains the Hurstwic site. Most of the text and photos are mine. If you have specific questions about the information on the site, I'll be glad to try to provide further information.

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:


If that 12th c. axe is dated correctly that is the first axe I have seen from that specific era. There is a great deal of interesting information on this site!


Thanks for your kind comments. The information on the axe from the current museum catalog is:
Accession Number: 1100
Region: Europe
Date: perhaps 13th century
Artifact Type: Battleaxe

There is no further information. John Higgins's interest was plate armor. It's likely that this item was in a lot with something he was more interested in, and that he acquired the axe having no information about its provenance. When we studied and photographed the axe, we came to the opinion that it probably was earlier than the estimate in the catalog.

Bill
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