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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 06 Aug, 2019 11:30 am    Post subject: Tod's Workshop YouTube channel         Reply with quote

If you haven't seen it already, I recommend folks check out Leo "Tod" Todeschini's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/todsstuff1 . He has some really interesting videos on there. Worth a look and a subscribe. Happy
Happy

ChadA

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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Wed 07 Aug, 2019 8:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Chad,

I have been making videos for a while now, but really it would not be possible without myArmoury as that is where I have learnt so very much - Thank you.

Just a note as well to say I have another vid coming up soon about armour penetration using a longbow against an Agincourt era breastplate.

Yes again; but with a difference.

The bow is a 160lbs mountain yew English longbow shot by Joe Gibbs

The arrows are properly made war shafts with case hardened wrought iron heads made by Will Sherman of Medievalarrows.co.uk

The breastplate is based on a Churburg piece at 0.5% carbon with variable thickness made by Kevin Legs of Plessisarmouries.co.uk

And context and analysis is given by Dr Tobias Capwell

The jupon is fashioned after that of CharlesVI by Chrissi Carnie of thesempster.co.uk

Altogether quite a team

And the result was...

Subscribe to make sure you don't miss it.

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
www.instagram.com/todsworkshop
www.facebook.com/TodTodeschini
www.youtube.com/todsworkshop


Last edited by Leo Todeschini on Sat 10 Aug, 2019 1:43 am; edited 1 time in total
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Chad Arnow
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Cincinnati, OH
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Likes: 21 pages
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Spotlight topics: 15
Posts: 9,193

PostPosted: Wed 07 Aug, 2019 9:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tod,
I canít wait to check that one out. Happy

Happy

ChadA

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Ian Hutchison




Location: Louisiana / Nordrhein-Westholland
Joined: 27 Nov 2007

Posts: 525

PostPosted: Wed 07 Aug, 2019 11:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leo Todeschini wrote:
Thanks Chad,

I have been making videos for a while now, but really it would not be possible without myArmoury as that is where I have learnt so very much - Thank you.

Just a note as well to say I have another vid coming up soon about armour penetration using a longbow against an Agincourt era breastplate.

Yes again; but with a difference.

The bow is a 160lbs mountain yew English longbow shot by Joe Gibbs

The arrows are properly made war shafts with case hardened wrought iron heads made by Will Sherman of Medieval arrows.co.uk

The breastplate is based on a Churburg piece at 0.5% carbon with variable thickness made by Kevin Legs of Plessisarmouries.co.uk

And context and analysis is given by Dr Tobias Capwell

The jupon is fashioned after that of CharlesVI by Chrissi Carnie of The Sempster

Altogether quite a team

And the result was...

Subscribe to make sure you don't miss it.

Tod


You have me on the edge of my chair now Tod! Can't wait. I subbed earlier today.

'We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.' - Adrian Carton de Wiart
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Joe Maccarrone




Location: Seattle, WA USA
Joined: 19 Sep 2003

Posts: 169

PostPosted: Wed 07 Aug, 2019 1:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leo Todeschini wrote:

And the result was...


What a tease! Can't wait to pull up a pint and watch it.. Big Grin
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,454

PostPosted: Thu 08 Aug, 2019 1:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leo Todeschini wrote:
Thanks Chad,

I have been making videos for a while now, but really it would not be possible without myArmoury as that is where I have learnt so very much - Thank you.

Just a note as well to say I have another vid coming up soon about armour penetration using a longbow against an Agincourt era breastplate.

Yes again; but with a difference.

The bow is a 160lbs mountain yew English longbow shot by Joe Gibbs

The arrows are properly made war shafts with case hardened wrought iron heads made by Will Sherman of Medieval arrows.co.uk

The breastplate is based on a Churburg piece at 0.5% carbon with variable thickness made by Kevin Legs of Plessisarmouries.co.uk

And context and analysis is given by Dr Tobias Capwell

The jupon is fashioned after that of CharlesVI by Chrissi Carnie of The Sempster

Altogether quite a team

And the result was...

Subscribe to make sure you don't miss it.

Tod


im also curious if you took a potshot with one of your more powerful crossbows as well


as for your channel, well theres not a whole lot i havent found interesting but one thing in which you do stand out is indeed your work with crossbows all the way from a roman arcuballista to the dark ages to the renaissance

also, you showing off your line of todcutler daggers on youtube was 100% something that made me want to go out and buy one
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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Tue 24 Sep, 2019 2:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have posted up a new video of the amazing Joe Gibbs shooting a 160lbs longbow and myself with a 860lbs cross bow, shooting and chatting about speed, accuracy, training and role uses of the two weapons.

We hope you enjoy it

https://youtu.be/1w8yHeF4KRk

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
www.instagram.com/todsworkshop
www.facebook.com/TodTodeschini
www.youtube.com/todsworkshop
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Benjamin H. Abbott




Location: New Mexico
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PostPosted: Tue 24 Sep, 2019 7:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for all these videos! As I mentioned on YouTube, Andreas Bichler's 1,200lb-draw composite crossbow has managed 160-200 J in tests with mid-weight bolts, depending on environmental conditions. That's more powerful than the 160lb-draw yew warbow in the video, which managed, what, 130 J initial? Note that this crossbow weighs 7.7lbs and its cranequin just under 6lbs, so it's a reasonably handy weapon.

We see lots of crossbows with thick composite prods in 15th-century (& earlier) artwork. Even if they were only as good as Bichler's replica, which I consider unlikely based on period sources, they still hit noticeably harder than any yew bow apart from perhaps the absolute strongest (200+lb draws).

Thus, at least for large field crossbows with composite prods, there was a power advantage to the crossbow.

Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!
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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2019 3:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Benjamin,

Benjamin Abbot wrote
Quote:
Thus, at least for large field crossbows with composite prods, there was a power advantage to the crossbow.


My understanding of Andrea's bow is that it is a rampart bow rather than a battlefield bow (if we are talking about his big one) and so other than this one was steel, we are not talking like for like. I am unsure of the numbers on his smaller bow, but yes that is battlefield. I have no doubt that my bows are not as goos as the originals, but I doubt they are that far behind and so I can only conclude that a steel limbed bow matched or was marginally outshot by the longbow, but was not far in excess of the longbow.

Talking to Joe, the 200 does deliver more, but not much as the sweet spot seems to be around the 160 mark.

Regards

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
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Benjamin H. Abbott




Location: New Mexico
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PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2019 10:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leo Todeschini wrote:
I am unsure of the numbers on his smaller bow, but yes that is battlefield.


You can find them in this and other videos. In cold, dry weather, that bow managed nearly 200 J at nearly 70 m/s. The comment has disappeared now, but the channel told me the bow weighs 3.5 kg and the cranequin 2.7 kg.

While slow to span, this sort of crossbow offers somewhat more power than the yew warbow and still has all the other advantages of the crossbow design as you discuss. And the best originals probably hit harder still, especially when carefully maintained to avoid moisture weakening the composite prod.

Apart from Ralph Payne-Gallwey's claimed shot, I agree we don't have much evidence that historical steel crossbows were significantly more powerful than yours. I suspect composite prods delivered more energy, at least if properly maintained, and were dramatically lighter and thus less encumbering than steel prods, but were more costly to make and maintain.

Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!
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Gregg Sobocinski




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PostPosted: Thu 26 Sep, 2019 7:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This comment about a 1200 pound crossbow draw weight makes me wonder: How common were 1000 pound or greater battlefield crossbows? How often would anyone come across one at a battlefield? Is there any existing way to know?
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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Sep, 2019 11:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am unfamiliar with composite bows, but I am with steel bows and I know the dimensions required to produce a 1200lbs crossbow and I often see steels in museums that as a guess would be up toward 2000lbs, so yes soldiers around 1450 onward would often encounter 1200 plus and if composite is to compete, it must also be up there.

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
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www.facebook.com/TodTodeschini
www.youtube.com/todsworkshop
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