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Pedro Paulo Gaião




Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
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PostPosted: Sat 24 Jun, 2017 6:19 pm    Post subject: Uses and Evidence for Gilt Armor         Reply with quote


British Library, Royal 14 D VI f. 84v

This manuscript illuminature's representing the landing of french troops in North Africa, during the Barbary Crusade. Oddly enough, Louis II, duke of Bourbon, is being shown in a set of gilt harness. If you have some acquaintance at looking manuscripts, you probably know other representations of royal figures being displayed in set of gold-covered armour (e.g. King of Jerusalem, Duke Charles the Bold), but this is the first one I have seen to represent a non royal nor sovereign noblemen in such type of harness. Before that, I though there was some regulation or traditional consensus that only kings could wear gilt armour; Graham Turner said Richard III probably had a gilt or silver-covered armour at Bosworth Field, justifying what he painted in two occasions).

I want to know if it was common for Medieval n' Early Modern - Era princes to wear gilt or silver covered ; if any noble could actually wear a gilt harness without having problems with local customs or military legislations and; if such armour was actually used for wars, instead of simply being used in tournments as a parade armor.

I'm actually convinced of some sort of military restriction because: the lengh of sabaton's was regulated according to the nobliarquical status of the wearer (Emperor, Count, Knight etc) as well as spurs (only knights could wear golden spurs, squires having silver ones).

If someone knows something about silvered , then I would be glad to hear. I had an photo of a 14th century coat of Plates covered in a silver (the plates, not the cloth), which preserved it until nowadays.

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Peter Spätling
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Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Sat 24 Jun, 2017 11:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

are you sure that the plates in the cop were not tinned?

As for gilded armour, the Treytz workshop made a gilded armour for the King of Scotland in the 1460's I believe (either '50s or '60s). It was meant as a present to the King by Sigismund of Tirol who married his sister if I remember correctly. More can be found in Reitzensteins "Der Waffenschmied".

There is a 14th century kettle hat from France which is believed to have belonged to the King of France, the whole thing is gilded.
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Pieter B.





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PostPosted: Sun 25 Jun, 2017 7:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Scottish Guard of the Valois Kings supposedly had silver gilt swords and leg protection. Gilt or brass trimming does show up on funeral effigies of knights and extant 16th armor meant for nobles or even princes.
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Philip Dyer





Joined: 25 Jul 2013

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PostPosted: Sun 25 Jun, 2017 1:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Spätling wrote:
are you sure that the plates in the cop were not tinned?

As for gilded armour, the Treytz workshop made a gilded armour for the King of Scotland in the 1460's I believe (either '50s or '60s). It was meant as a present to the King by Sigismund of Tirol who married his sister if I remember correctly. More can be found in Reitzensteins "Der Waffenschmied".

There is a 14th century kettle hat from France which is believed to have belonged to the King of France, the whole thing is gilded.

I share the same sentiment. I honest do not why you would spend the extra money silver gilting plate on something that wouldn't be visible when worn whereas tinning helps protect the plates from rust and is a lot cheaper.
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Pedro Paulo Gaião




Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2017 12:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Spätling wrote:
are you sure that the plates in the cop were not tinned?

As for gilded , the Treytz workshop made a gilded for the King of Scotland in the 1460's I believe (either '50s or '60s). It was meant as a present to the King by Sigismund of Tirol who married his sister if I remember correctly. More can be found in Reitzensteins "Der Waffenschmied".

There is a 14th century kettle hat from France which is believed to have belonged to the King of France, the whole thing is gilded.


I don't know the difference between gilt and tinned, actually. But here's the plates, I was founded Hirchstein Castle, Germany:

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Peter Spätling
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Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2017 12:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

the plates on this find have been cleaned thoroughly by the finder (!sadly! (that idiot...)), probably with an acid. It can no longer be said whether these were tinned or not. Everything that remains are iron/steel plates. And the plates themselves were mounted on the inside of a coat of plates. The outside was covered with a textile, so gilding doesn't make any sense as the gold would not have been seen.

Tinned = covered with tin
Gilded = covered with gold
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Pedro Paulo Gaião




Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
Joined: 14 Mar 2015

Posts: 261

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jul, 2017 5:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pieter B. wrote:
The Scottish Guard of the Valois Kings supposedly had silver gilt swords and leg protection. Gilt or brass trimming does show up on funeral effigies of knights and extant 16th armor meant for nobles or even princes.


Swiss Halberdiers in the Garde du Corps had their sword's guards and pommels "made of gold" (probably gilt in that case). If you're refering to the pictorial reference in "The Adoration of the Magi", I must warn you that those decorations change from king to king, like a royal livery. In a latter manuscript showing Francis I's army at march (Italian Wars in context), his Guarde du Corps (both the scots and the swiss) are wearing red and yellow liveries.


Peter Spätling wrote:
Tinned = covered with tin
Gilded = covered with gold


If it's covered with silver, it's called "silver gilting"? Sounds odd ...

By the way, I found other illustrations that seens to imply gilting practice among burgundian cavalry. They came from Schilling's manuscript:

http://warfare2.netai.net/15/Bernese_Chronicle-v3-p011.htm
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Luka Borscak




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Aug, 2017 1:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Covered with silver is simply said "silvered". There is a silvered mail shirt from Bulgaria, 10th century supposedly. Probably byzantine manufacture.


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