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Ben Brewer




Location: England
Joined: 12 Dec 2015

Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 8:41 am    Post subject: Experiences with Deepeeka swords?         Reply with quote

So I was searching around and came across a company called Deepeeka who I have never heard of before.

I was wondering if anyone has ever bought something from them and what their products are like.

Sorry if this post is in the wrong place this is around my 3rd major post.
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Gregory J. Liebau




Location: Dinuba, CA
Joined: 27 Nov 2004

Posts: 669

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 9:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Deepeeka is known for very inexpensive, heavy, crudely made, but generally "nice looking" and sturdy swords. They work decently for entry-level reenactment or wall displays to impress people who know nothing about historical weaponry. About ten years ago I purchased eight or nine Deepeeka swords when I first made my foray into the hobby, mostly from the ancient and early medieval period. They were all bulky and the fittings on the scabbards were blah and the blades had no decent cross-sections, etc.

Lots of people have invested time in customizing Deepeeka swords (especially the ancient stuff) to make a better appearance for reenactment. It's also rumored - again, particularly with their Roman offerings - that the quality is getting much better these days. However, the prices are so low for a reason. These are not fine quality weapons. They're rather fun, though, and if for nothing more than to learn the decidedly different approaches to manufacturing modern reproductions, it might be worth picking up a couple of them so that you have a caution story down the road such as mine. Cheers!

-Gregory
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Joe A




Location: Philadelphia, USA
Joined: 17 Oct 2013

Posts: 59

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 9:21 am    Post subject: Re: Experiences with Deepeeka swords?         Reply with quote

Ben Brewer wrote:
So I was searching around and came across a company called Deepeeka who I have never heard of before.

I was wondering if anyone has ever bought something from them and what their products are like.

Sorry if this post is in the wrong place this is around my 3rd major post.


By your question I am assuming you are new to this.

Before anyone tells you that all their stuff is crap, let me say that almost every one I've met here, on other forums, in my museum work and as a reenactor started off with a relatively inexpensive Deepeeka product. I own more than a few very expensive custom swords and also continue to purchase Deepeeka products as I need them for very different audiences.

Few of us go right to the middle and high-end as the costs and wait times are daunting and if you want to build up a basic kit to do some reenacting now and have nobody to lend you the critical pieces; sword, helmet, shield and garments, you may want to consider a smaller investment until you decide if this is what you want to do with your spare time, and money.

For better advice you should inform the community here what you want to do with the kit you are interested in.

Also, always consider buying used swords/kit for your initial purchases as most of the good folks here keep their swords/kit in very good order. In the US, the weeks before tax filing in April, always seem to produce a large number of quality swords and helmets entering the market lol.

Good luck!
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Ben Brewer




Location: England
Joined: 12 Dec 2015

Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 9:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply.

For some reason I thought they were a under the carpet company rather than the go to people for starting off : P

I was interested in owning a steel sword mainly for practicing technique as I already have a rawlings synthetic and to possibly use in our class.
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 11:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

One of the overwhelming maxims is buy before you try Ben. Even the greatest swordsmith or cutler can make a sword that isn't right for you so nothing beats picking it up and feeling for yourself.

Where in the UK are you? I can probably suggest a few places to go. If you are near me on the mid wales/england border you are more than welcome to visit my store, piles of swords!

Griff

Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 11:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Over 14 years I sold many Deepeeka swords and other weapons. They ranged in quality from good to lousy, mostly good. We posted disclaimers everywhere to protect our company from lawsuits and fortunately nobody was ever injured, that we know of, using a sword or dirk or whatever that we sold them. We always, however, recommended these swords not be used in combat.

Now, depending on what I was buying from them I could either remove it from the packaging, wipe off the excess oil and grease and put it on the table and sell it, or I would have to do some sort of repair, minor to major, to feel good about offering it to my customers. The price point for their stuff is indicative of what you may want to do to some of their pieces when you buy them and as mentioned by someone else, apparently end-user modifications to these swords are common.

All that being said, they were fine people with which to work. They were helpful, careful to notify me when a back-ordered pieces arrived and willing to accept the return of anything that was simply not reparable at our location (when repairs were needed). We developed a nice customer - seller relationship and I can vouch for their integrity.

One thing I really liked about them was they offered a wide variety of stuff that nobody else made or sold. It was not always in stock but if you were patient eventually it would arrive. I can also say that as we prepared to sell our business to another vendor, in late 2014, the quality of some of their pieces, and not just the Roman stuff, had improved. In fact, when we sold out I did keep a couple of items for my personal collection.

So, as always caveat emptor but you could do a lot worse than a Deepeeka sword or armor.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 08 May 2009
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Posts: 1,492

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 1:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ben Brewer wrote:
I was interested in owning a steel sword mainly for practicing technique as I already have a rawlings synthetic and to possibly use in our class.


Probably the use for which Deepeeka will be least recommended. For longsword, I don't think they have anything suitable. Their one-handed "stage combat" blunts might possibly work for partner drills, but tend to be rather heavy, and probably ill-balanced. The non-stage-combat versions are lighter iirc, but the thinner edges make them less suitable for partner work.

For Deepeeka-like prices, I think the Hanwei Practical Knightly and/or Hand and a Half are better for HEMA. Many people say bad things about them as HEMA swords, but they don't look/feel that bad to me, and I think they work as cheap beginner swords (I haven't put them through hard steel-on-steel fighting).

For a somewhat higher price, there's a whole bunch of European-made swords that might suit.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Ben Brewer




Location: England
Joined: 12 Dec 2015

Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 2:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark Griffin wrote:
One of the overwhelming maxims is buy before you try Ben. Even the greatest swordsmith or cutler can make a sword that isn't right for you so nothing beats picking it up and feeling for yourself.

Where in the UK are you? I can probably suggest a few places to go. If you are near me on the mid wales/england border you are more than welcome to visit my store, piles of swords!

Griff

I`m about as far South as you can get in England excluding the Isle of Wight.

Having said that I wouldn`t mind taking a trip to your shop if it means I can find some good swords.

I also don`t suppose who sell Basket hilt Scottish broadsword or backswords do you?
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
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Posts: 1,208

PostPosted: Fri 29 Jan, 2016 4:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ben...Armour Class in Glasgow would be a good choice for a basket hilt. They make several different configurations and are of very good quality.
Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Sat 30 Jan, 2016 3:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, Armour Class do great basket hilts, must be something in the water up there. They can do blunt or sharp and I use AC for all my live fight needs for over 20 years with no problerms and excellent service.

I don't have a shop Ben sorry if saying store gave you that impression. I have an armoury/arsenal as I'm a historian dealing with that kind of thing for events, museums film and tv.

I'm occasionally on the IOW at Osborne and Carisbrook although sadly not for the jousts this summer, I'll be in Cornwall. If you can make it up to E London on 18/19 June there will be a few dealers there. Phil Fraser will be selling Heron Armoury swords, also very good, made by Tim Noyes. If not the biiiiiiiig market is TORM 11/12 13 March where there will be more sword sellers than you can wave a sword at.

Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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Michael Beeching





Joined: 22 Jan 2014
Reading list: 2 books

Posts: 159

PostPosted: Mon 08 Feb, 2016 3:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was considering finally getting a spear, and this one piqued my interest:

http://www.kultofathena.com/product.asp?item=...Tene+Spear

...What I start to wonder about with Deepeeka products is how well they actually hold up, considering that they are not tempered according to their website. Observe the rather interesting entry here as an example:

http://deepeeka.in/products-catalog/edged-wea...sword.html

Perhaps some of their arms are actually tempered, but I doubt it when some of their swords are listed as being made of mild steel! Just take a look here:

http://deepeeka.in/products-catalog/edged-wea...-1611.html

That said, is there anyone here with some technical experience regarding durability or usage of a sharp/functional Deepeeka weapon? I see they also sell crossbows, but I'd need to have a really good reason to put my money down with a company that would sell a sword made of mild steel. Heck, if I wanted one of those, I'd just buy an angle grinder and requisition a 1/4" piece of plate from work!

*EDIT: Upon re-reading some of the thread, there is a bit of insight into usage of Deepeeka weapons. I suppose what I'm after is a bit more insight into their use as (potentially) modified arms in a training application. That question has already been asked, yes, but if there's a bit more information to share, I'd appreciate it.
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