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Harry D.




Location: Los Angeles
Joined: 31 Aug 2015

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PostPosted: Wed 07 Oct, 2015 9:35 am    Post subject: Oakeshott's Type XVIIIc by Mateusz Sulowski         Reply with quote

Hello, My Sulowski XVIIIc sword has arrived. Thanks to Patrick for the recommendation and thanks to Mateusz for making such a nice sword. The packaging and shipping was first rate and the sword is beautiful. It swings very nicely and looks to be a great cutter. I told Mateusz I was going to use it for tatami, so, it is paper cutting sharp. It feels very comfortable and well balanced. The scabbard is very nice and comfortable. It hangs well and draws fast... the whole package is high quality.. I will post more impressions and some cutting videos with it later..



Packaging was bullet proof and heavy.. The Directions were clear Happy











Comparisons to the Albion Svante. The Sulowski is much thinner and 3/4 of a pound lighter.. You cannot tell by the pics, but, the Svante seems to be a much more substantial weapon against armour - with a very think spine and a much thicker tip. Both great War swords. I love the broad blade of the Sulowski, it is thin (6 mm) and broad. It probably will be a better cutter.. The sword feels easy to stop and start quickly.









Last edited by Harry D. on Fri 16 Oct, 2015 4:47 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Wed 07 Oct, 2015 5:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks great Harry. Congrats!
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Harry D.




Location: Los Angeles
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PostPosted: Thu 08 Oct, 2015 3:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
Looks great Harry. Congrats!


Thanks Patrick. I took it out for a spin and did some cutting... It's wicked sharp, light, & fast. Love the way it swings and cuts. It seems easy to keep the edge aligned, and I love the broad blade. I will try some tatami this weekend. Here is a quick video..

https://youtu.be/Uuwu8SM6cow


Cool
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Thu 08 Oct, 2015 3:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Helpful hint #1: don't put the sword back into the scabbard without drying it off. By doing so you introduce moisture into the scabbard's interior, not good.

Helpful hint #2: I have little doubt there are Western Martial Arts groups of some kind in your area. Try finding one and get some training. You'll find your exercises both safer and more enjoyable.

I understand your eagerness though. When you get a new sword you just wanna cut some stuff. Big Grin I love the sword, if my Type XIV hadn't been available I would have bought yours.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Mateusz S.
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Location: Poland
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PostPosted: Thu 08 Oct, 2015 10:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello,
I'm glad that you have received the sword quickly. I think listen to Patrick. always put dry sword into the scabbard. before cutting water bottles or sharpening with waterstones, lubricate the blade with oil (not food) or technical vaseline. It is good against rust.

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Thu 08 Oct, 2015 10:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I strongly suggest leaving the scabbard somewhere else while you're cutting. Practice form and don't get caught up in the draw action or dealing with it hanging from your hip. It's all about the sword. As mentioned, always maintain your sword after your cutting: dry and oil it before storing it in the scabbard.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Fri 09 Oct, 2015 6:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would be really worried about any water that might have been put into the scabbard, even if you only did this once in your video.

I would advise to keep the sword outside of the scabbard and give the scabbard some time to dry out 100% before putting the sword into the scabbard for any extended time.

I've left my swords in scabbards without getting any rust problems, but then my house's micro climate seems to be dry.

Some people are less lucky with rust and leaving swords in scabbards.

By the way I made the mistake of wanting to clean the inside of a scabbard a long time ago using rubbing alcohol thinking it would just evaporate away, but it took weeks or months to get the scabbard 100% dry enough that I could leave, in this case a knife, in the scabbard.

Oil the blade and check the fit of the scabbard occasionally as humidity can change the fit of a scabbard, but don't leave the sword in the scabbard until it is really dry inside the scabbard.

Maybe others have better advice about this since I haven't had much trouble with rust on my swords.

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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Fri 09 Oct, 2015 7:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
I strongly suggest leaving the scabbard somewhere else while you're cutting. Practice form and don't get caught up in the draw action or dealing with it hanging from your hip. It's all about the sword. As mentioned, always maintain your sword after your cutting: dry and oil it before storing it in the scabbard.


I would also recommend not treating the draw and cut as if it was a " Quick draw contest ", this just makes you tense up instead of relax into the cut as you are trying too hard to be instantly good and fast and putting too much pressure on yourself trying to be perfect right away.

Look at it as if you where training for running a marathon: Would you try running 10 miles before you worked your way up to being able to run a city block ? You want to start slow and increase distance a little bit each time your train and eventually you might be able to run a marathon without giving yourself a heart attack.

I appreciate your enthusiasm and only hope that my comments are being helpful and not seem to be harsh or overly critical, but high levels of skill with any activity takes time, rushing it may just mean learning bad habits that will have to be unlearned later.

All of the above meant in the most friendly way possible. Cool

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Harry D.




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PostPosted: Sun 11 Oct, 2015 10:07 am    Post subject: Thanks Guys !         Reply with quote

Hi Guys, thanks for your help ! I had a microfiber cloth in my pocket to wipe the sword before putting back in the scabbard, but, I had a brain fart during the video and forgot to wipe it... I realized it after that one time, and left the scabbard in the sun for a few hours. It was very hot here that day, and the leather got pretty hot, so, I escaped any moisture accumulation in the scabbard.... I do not store the sword in scabbard.. I also realize that I am swinging the sword like a baseball bat and have been shadow practicing short, higher strokes, keeping my arms bent, facing the target, and stepping before I start my swing... I am dedicated to learning to handle the sword correctly... Thanks again for your help, I have a lot to learn, and will take it step by step.. Bon Courage !
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T. Kew




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PostPosted: Sun 11 Oct, 2015 5:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Thanks Guys !         Reply with quote

Harry D. wrote:
Hi Guys, thanks for your help ! I had a microfiber cloth in my pocket to wipe the sword before putting back in the scabbard, but, I had a brain fart during the video and forgot to wipe it... I realized it after that one time, and left the scabbard in the sun for a few hours. It was very hot here that day, and the leather got pretty hot, so, I escaped any moisture accumulation in the scabbard.... I do not store the sword in scabbard.. I also realize that I am swinging the sword like a baseball bat and have been shadow practicing short, higher strokes, keeping my arms bent, facing the target, and stepping before I start my swing... I am dedicated to learning to handle the sword correctly... Thanks again for your help, I have a lot to learn, and will take it step by step.. Bon Courage !


A quick comment on one aspect of this: "stepping before I start my swing".

I'm not sure what your objective in cutting practice is, but most fencing systems generally advise against this. While it's very effective for cutting static targets, it leaves you very open in a fight.

The phrase used in Ms32227a ("Dobringer') is a useful rule of thumb: "For example, if someone intends to strike or thrust, it goes just like if a string would be attached to the sword and the tip or edge would be pulled to an opening of the adversary" (13v)

Lead your strike first with your weapon - the tip moves forward. The hands and arms follow that, then the body, then the feet. This doesn't mean you sweep all the way through with the hands before any step, simply that you lead with your weapon. As long as you do so with good edge alignment and body structure, you'll still cut very powerfully.

There is an elegant explanation of this here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0LpsnO0E4U

Instructor and scholar, Cambridge HEMA
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Julien M




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PostPosted: Mon 12 Oct, 2015 6:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice sword, beautiful broad blade and subtle hilt furniture.

One question though, what's that below? The blade looks somehow pitted or of uneven finish?

Cheers,

Julien

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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Mon 12 Oct, 2015 1:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That appears to be debris in the oil coating the blade. When my sword arrived it was pretty heavily covered in oil like that.
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Mateusz S.
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PostPosted: Mon 12 Oct, 2015 10:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

yes;) before shipment I cover every steel parts with oil. This protects against rust during a few days of transport.
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Harry D.




Location: Los Angeles
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PostPosted: Tue 13 Oct, 2015 5:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
Very nice sword, beautiful broad blade and subtle hilt furniture.

One question though, what's that below? The blade looks somehow pitted or of uneven finish?

Cheers,

Julien



Hello, The blade is beautifully finished and sharp.. I re-oiled the blade after unpacking and before taking the pictures, so, that is why you see that weird reflection and those dust specks clinging to the oil ... The Svante is also heavily oiled, so, it may also have some weird reflections... There are some better pictures of the same blade and tip on the Sulowski facebook page... I am new to swords, but, I am really enjoying this piece, and it seems to be a great value... Here are a few pics from the Sulowski facebook page that show the blade better..





Here you can see the 50 HS 54 HRC marking on the blade..

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