Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > myArmoury.com Features Talk > Jan 31: myArmoury.com news and updates Reply to topic
This is a standard topic Go to page 1, 2  Next 

Considering all of the features for this week's site update, please rate the quality of our efforts.
Excellent
70%
 70%  [ 38 ]
Very Good
25%
 25%  [ 14 ]
Good
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Fair
3%
 3%  [ 2 ]
Poor
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 54

Author Message
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Sun 30 Jan, 2005 10:28 pm    Post subject: Jan 31: myArmoury.com news and updates         Reply with quote

Today's update:


The Paper Armoury: Our Top Shelf

An article by Sean A. Flynt


The Anglo Saxon Broken Back Seax

An article by Frank Docherty


Darkwood Armory English Rapier

A hands-on review by Geoff Freeman


As always, you can see our Complete History of Updates listed right from our home page.

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Sun 30 Jan, 2005 10:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Please note that in the article, "The Paper Armoury: Our Top Shelf ", each book is linked to a page on a retailer's site that has the book available for purchase. If you click on these links in the article and then follow-through with an actual sale during that same session, myArmoury.com will earn some affiliate credit from that sale. All proceeds from these sales will be used to purchase book prizes for upcoming contests. The knowledge contained in the books is encouragement enough to buy them, but I also hope that knowing you're giving back to the site and community might further convince you to augment your own library.

A couple books don't have links, as they're no longer commonly available: you'll likely find them in the used market or perhaps new from a more obscure source.

Cheers!

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
William Goodwin




Location: Roanoke,Va
Joined: 17 Nov 2003
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 20 books

Posts: 1,001

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 3:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks to Sean, Frank, Geoff and Nathan for another week of great articles & reviews. The book thing is especially cool!


Bill

Roanoke Sword Guilde

roanokeswordguilde@live.com
"I was born for this" - Joan of Arc
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Reading list: 15 books

Posts: 790

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 3:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very good update once again. I have to admit that I was a bit surprised when I saw that Ashdown's European Arms & Armor made the list. I have rather strong feelings against that book, but I guess it does still have some value. I still do not believe that his information on "banded maille" is correct, but the rest of the text is valuable; just don't trust the illustrations too much.

I only see two problems with this update, and both of them are in the "Paper Armoury." First, I already own about half of these books, so I can't go out and buy them all. Second, I only own about half of these books, so I can't afford to go out and buy them all. I want my cake, and I want to eat it too!!

Keep up the good work!

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
View user's profile Send private message
Chad Arnow
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Cincinnati, OH
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 21 pages
Reading list: 231 books

Spotlight topics: 15
Posts: 9,132

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 4:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
Very good update once again. I have to admit that I was a bit surprised when I saw that Ashdown's European Arms & Armor made the list. I have rather strong feelings against that book, but I guess it does still have some value. I still do not believe that his information on "banded maille" is correct, but the rest of the text is valuable; just don't trust the illustrations too much.

-Grey


Grey,
The Ashdown was my choice, and I debated including it. His own drawings are sometimes inaccurate (Romans didn't use what look like wheel-pommeled swords with cross guards) and some info is out of date. But the plates are really good, and his sketches of effigial monuments are valuable resources. The progression of armour from maille through full plate is laid out pretty well and shows the various reinforcements pretty well. It's usually available for pretty cheap (from $4.25 on the Amazon link), which is another plus.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Location: Göteborg Sweden
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 411

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 6:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that one about The Anglo Saxon Broken Back Seax,
they are so hard to get some information about them out there, and when i found something
it's always about the big one and the runes on it, i like the small ones more,
they are more useful to work with and handle, and i will buy one when i found one Big Grin

Nathan! there are no link to it in Features Happy

Frid o Fröjd!
Patrik
View user's profile Send private message
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 7:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom wrote:
Nathan! there are no link to it in Features Happy

It's under "Historical Background and Research", but the "NEW" icon wasn't showing up. We've had this article completed for awhile so the timer timed out. I reset it. (oops)

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Location: Göteborg Sweden
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 411

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 9:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

How could i miss that Big Grin

The funny thing with the big seax with rune's on it, is that people always look at the easy ones (pic 1)
and i have always wonder what the lower ones are, is it a pattern or is it a name? (pic 2)



 Attachment: 10.19 KB
seaxrunes11.JPG
Pic 1

 Attachment: 9.55 KB
seaxrunes22.JPG
Pic 2

Frid o Fröjd!
Patrik
View user's profile Send private message
Alexi Goranov
myArmoury Alumni


myArmoury Alumni

Location: San Francisco, CA
Joined: 24 Jan 2004
Reading list: 72 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 1,191

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 10:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:

Grey,
The Ashdown was my choice, and I debated including it. His own drawings are sometimes inaccurate (Romans didn't use what look like wheel-pommeled swords with cross guards) and some info is out of date. But the plates are really good, and his sketches of effigial monuments are valuable resources. The progression of armour from maille through full plate is laid out pretty well and shows the various reinforcements pretty well. It's usually available for pretty cheap (from $4.25 on the Amazon link), which is another plus.


So I just bought this book, hoping that the plates will make the $15 worth it. Meanwhile I hope that Armi Bianche Italiani will surface for less than $444 (as per "www.bookfinder.com" site).

What is the difference between this Gerry Embelton book: Medieval Military Costume (Europa Militaria Special, 8), and the one in this weeks feature article? Do they cover different periods, or have different approaches? Why get one and not the other?

Alexi
View user's profile Send private message
Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Likes: 50 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,161

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 11:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As to the fighting qualities of the Seax I think that the comparison to Bowie knives is very hard to avoid: I can't be the first person to notice the resemblance. Does anyone else think that the Bagwell Bowie "Hell's Bell" as made by Ontario knives resembles some single edged Medieval daggers ?

The Ashdown book does reflect what was considered at the time, 1906, the right interpretation of maille being sometimes "banded" which I think was first proposed by Violet Leduc in the 19th century as an explanation of drawings showing maille: A very literal view that the horizontal lines separating rows of maille actually were a structural features of the construction of maille made of leather and holding together overlaping ring. This was all very imaginative but very wrong.

Still the book has a lot of interesting things in it, even if some 19th century opinions have been proven wrong.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
View user's profile Send private message
Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,678

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 11:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
What is the difference between this Gerry Embelton book: Medieval Military Costume (Europa Militaria Special, 8), and the one in this weeks feature article? Do they cover different periods, or have different approaches? Why get one and not the other?

Alexi


Alexi,

I consider Medieval Military Costume to be more of a supplement to The Medieval Soldier than anything else. Both books feature color photographs of the same living historians that were obviously taken at the same time and place. The Medieval Soldier focuses specifically on the 15th century, whereas Medieval Military Costume does have a few sections dealing with earlier periods, although the majority of it is also oriented towards the 15th century. I was a bit disappointed in Medieval Military Costume since I was expecting more information on other periods.

Medieval Military Costume is a smaller Osprey style book whereas The Medieval Solider is a much larger work.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
View user's profile Send private message
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 11:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm glad you both brought up Medieval Military Costume because it's a book I don't own. I forgot about it, frankly, so I'll be adding it to my own "someday" list. My main struggle with books now is that I have most of the readily available titles on arms and armour and am left with hard-to-find and very expensive titles now: so unfortunately, my own library augmentation is now going to be very slow.
.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jeremy Scott Steimel




Location: Champaign, IL
Joined: 24 Jan 2004

Posts: 105

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 7:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

"The Paper Armoury: Our Top Shelf"

... Talk about 'Ask And You Shall Receive.' (something similar was discussed in a thread just weeks ago)

On a related note, I finally got a hardcopy of Swords in the Age of Chivalry today (well, ordered it last week, it arrived today). Time to study.

Dum spiro, spero
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 7:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy Scott Steimel wrote:
... Talk about 'Ask And You Shall Receive.' (something similar was discussed in a thread just weeks ago)

I was hoping somebody would notice Happy

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jeremy Scott Steimel




Location: Champaign, IL
Joined: 24 Jan 2004

Posts: 105

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 7:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
Jeremy Scott Steimel wrote:
... Talk about 'Ask And You Shall Receive.' (something similar was discussed in a thread just weeks ago)

I was hoping somebody would notice Happy


Yup... and good timing. Last week's order (on a completely random note -- also received today the 'Think Like Amano' art collection of Yoshitaka Amano's work. Great collection if anyone is a fan of his work) has me in book-expansion mode, and I was planning to snag Records and Swordsman's Companion this week. Now I can do it guilt free. It's a contribution, right? :-)

Dum spiro, spero
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Bill Grandy
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Alexandria, VA USA
Joined: 25 Aug 2003
Reading list: 43 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 4,146

PostPosted: Mon 31 Jan, 2005 8:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy Scott Steimel wrote:
Now I can do it guilt free. It's a contribution, right? :-)


I like the way this man thinks!
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Reading list: 15 books

Posts: 790

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 1:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just to be clear, I wasn't trying to say anything derogitory about Ashdown's book. I own it, and it can be a very valuable resource. Like Chad, I would have debated including it, but in the end it probably would have made the cut.

Jeremy Scott Steimel, has the right idea. I need more of these books (though I too suffer a bit from Nathan Robinson's problem of owning the easy to find ones), and it might as well help out myArmoury. Now I just hope I can find space in my barracks room for another book shelf!

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
View user's profile Send private message
Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,678

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 9:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've been finding that many of the newer books being published are far superior to the older "classic" titles. Many of the older works are full of inaccuracies and misinformation. Some of the newer one present much more accurate information. So just because it's old and rare doesn't neccesarily mean it's any good. Personally I'm past the point were I'm going to pay a large some for a book just to add it to my library. Being able to say "I have one of those" isn't enough for me anymore.
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
View user's profile Send private message
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 9:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The desire for those books goes well beyond that, Patrick. Many of the difficult to acquire titles are foreign-language publications that document items rarely seen on this side of the globe.
.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Alexi Goranov
myArmoury Alumni


myArmoury Alumni

Location: San Francisco, CA
Joined: 24 Jan 2004
Reading list: 72 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 1,191

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 9:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
The desire for those books goes well beyond that, Patrick. Many of the difficult to acquire titles are foreign-language publications that document items rarely seen on this side of the globe.


that is the sad truth. I just got heribert Seitz'es two volume work "Ein Waffenhistorisches Handbuch Blankwaffen " from the nearby, friendly, neighborhood, Harvard library, and it is full of pictures and diagrams I have not come accross in the "easy to find, english" titles. This book set costs more than $240, but damn it is worth it, even if you do not speak german. All weapon categories are covered in time-periods. Now I just have to get my wife to translate.......... And if you are in post-medieval weapons........you just have to have this book......

Alexi
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > myArmoury.com Features Talk > Jan 31: myArmoury.com news and updates
Page 1 of 2 Reply to topic
Go to page 1, 2  Next All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum