Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > "falchion" from d&d Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Jason Pack




Location: Texas
Joined: 10 May 2014

Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat 10 May, 2014 11:00 pm    Post subject: "falchion" from d&d         Reply with quote

so i am a nerd. i play dungeons and dragons and i was going through the weapons section of fourth edition and i come across this weapon that they call a falchion. it looks nothing like falchions that i have ever seen before. especially since they consider this a 2 handed weapon. so what would this weapon be considered in real life? or what coulld it be described as?

its the one on the far right
for scale the other swords are described as a rapier and greatsword.

View user's profile Send private message
Ian Hutchison




Location: Louisiana / Nordrhein-Westholland
Joined: 27 Nov 2007

Posts: 444

PostPosted: Sat 10 May, 2014 11:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Reminds me of the glaive from the Maciejowski bible:


'We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.' - Adrian Carton de Wiart
View user's profile Send private message
Quinn W.




Location: Bellingham, WA
Joined: 02 May 2009

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Sun 11 May, 2014 12:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was taught that a glaive was a type of pole weapon but it still sounds like the most accurate description to me. I would have discounted it altogether but the Mac picture there does look surprisingly close.
Sorry, I was kind of distracted by that thing on the left. It's pretty hilarious.

"Some say that the age of chivalry is past, that the spirit of romance is dead. The age of chivalry is never past, so long as there is a wrong left unredressed on earth"
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 08 May 2009
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 1,491

PostPosted: Sun 11 May, 2014 1:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

From the guard, it looks like it's meant to be held concave edge forwards. So perhaps a falx, e.g., as seen on http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=15659
"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 941

PostPosted: Sun 11 May, 2014 2:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

D&D weapons are hilarious. And I say that as a gamer myself. Happy

Based on the image, I'd call it a short glaive. Sort of a nagamaki type deal, or indeed the Maciejowski chopper.

Based on the stats, it's a two-handed scimitar - except that it hits only as hard as a one-handed scimitar. So probably the only difference is that it has an extra long handle that would be awkward in one hand. So, again, short glaive sort of thing, and a fairly light one at that.

Based on the text descriptions, it should be a two-handed kriegsmesser or Swiss saber.

(Based on the 3rd edition image, on the other hand, it's an utterly silly thing that should not exist. Razz)

Quinn W. wrote:
I was taught that a glaive was a type of pole weapon but it still sounds like the most accurate description to me. I would have discounted it altogether but the Mac picture there does look surprisingly close.
Sorry, I was kind of distracted by that thing on the left. It's pretty hilarious.

It's a "spiked chain". It's supposed to have the reach of a polearm but be handier up close...

Of course, that's still not as hilarious as the "dire flail". Basically, two flails on the opposite ends of one haft. I have no idea how they thought you could use that with anything resembling efficacy, or even basic safety...

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
View user's profile Send private message
Ben Coomer




Location: Colorado
Joined: 06 Sep 2011

Posts: 184

PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2014 8:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow. That chain thingy is close to the least practical weapon I've ever seen. Still, the spiked club with two more spiked clubs connected by long chains takes the cake still. There was no way to use it without hurting oneself.

Still, probably the most historic analogue to your weapon is a kriegsmesser or maybe a dadao.
View user's profile Send private message
William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,424

PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2014 10:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

im definately going with it being most similar to a dadao, hands down, the ide blade and the handle of almost the same lngth... makes it a westernised version of a dadao IMO
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tyler Jordan





Joined: 15 Mar 2004

Posts: 93

PostPosted: Mon 12 May, 2014 5:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm gong to go by the descriptions more than the illustrations, because the D&D ilustrations range wildly from mostly ok to WTF were they thinking.
What D&D calls a Falchion most resembles something like a Kriegsmesser, as a two-handed weapon, distinguished from the greatsword by being a dedicated chopper with more power but somewhat less finesse than the latter.

In previous editions, the Falchion was a one-handed chopper much more akin to a Cutlass, I'm not sure what prompted the change.
View user's profile Send private message
Elling Polden




Location: Bergen, Norway
Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,576

PostPosted: Tue 13 May, 2014 7:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I should say that the weapon refered to in D&D is the oversized, two handed falchions shown in the hands of heathens in medevial art.

the logic goes as follows; oriental heathens are described to a late medevial artist as using a "single edged sword." The artists thus draws the heathen with the kind of single edged sword he is familiar with; a falchion. And to bring the point across he makes it ridiculously large.
Victorian scholars look at the image, and deduce from the depiction that oriental heathens used huge two handed falchions.
Gary Gygax reads this book, or more likely, talks to someone who did, and puts down "falchion" as the name of a two handed curved sword.
30 years later, a fantacy artist that has no clue about historical weapons reads Gygax' description, and draws a falchion with a sweihander handle.

I belive there are some chinese or indian executioners swords that could look roughly similar. There are also some depictions of very large falchions in some late medevial manuscripst, but these do not have very long handles.

The best description would probably be "twohanded falchion".

"this [fight] looks curious, almost like a game. See, they are looking around them before they fall, to find a dry spot to fall on, or they are falling on their shields. Can you see blood on their cloths and weapons? No. This must be trickery."
-Reidar Sendeman, from King Sverre's Saga, 1201
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Tue 13 May, 2014 4:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The old D&D designs were not that bad. Unlike the modern fantasy designs they just have different parts of different swords meshed together, some of the modern fantasy swords has a gigantic blade and almost impossible to even hold one. And that horse seems to enjoy his master cutting another man in half, just look at him smiling!
View user's profile Send private message
Benjamin H. Abbott




Location: New Mexico
Joined: 28 Feb 2004

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,187

PostPosted: Tue 13 May, 2014 5:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I second that the posted imagine mostly closely resembles a two-handed dao. Various curved, single-edge swords with long handles saw use in China and Japan for ages, so I figure they were pretty effective. As folks have noted, similar weapons appeared in Europe.
Read my historically inspired fantasy fiction in here. I walk along a winding path set by Ludovico Ariosto, William Morris, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Ursula Le Guin.

Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Phil D.




Location: Texas
Joined: 23 Sep 2003
Reading list: 56 books

Posts: 590

PostPosted: Tue 13 May, 2014 5:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Somewhat reminds me of this...



http://www.kultofathena.com/product.asp?item=...n+Scimitar

"A bottle of wine contains more philosophy than all the books in the world." -- Louis Pasteur

"A gentleman should never leave the house without a sharp knife, a good watch, and great hat."
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > "falchion" from d&d
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum