Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > How were arming points made on a gambson? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 1:13 am    Post subject: How were arming points made on a gambson?         Reply with quote

Hello

I recently had a shoulder made from arming street and it had two holes on it. I was told these are called arming points and I was suppose to attach them to my gambeson's arming point. The problem is my gambeson doesn't have an arming point, is there any instruction on how to make one? Or do I just cut holes into my gambeson and call it a day? Thanks.

Ed
View user's profile Send private message
Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 1:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Find an old, solid leather belt (or any thick leather). Cut small squares, but not too small, 1 for each arming point. Punch 2 holes for point in the middle and as many holes you like along the edges for sewing onto your gambeson.

This way you don't have to punch a hole in the fabric of the gambeson. If you do it will likely tear sooner or later. And if you change your setup you can easily remove the leather patch and place it somewhere else.



 Attachment: 161.96 KB
20140110_111004.jpg



Last edited by Tjarand Matre on Fri 10 Jan, 2014 2:05 am; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 2:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tjarand Matre wrote:
Find an old, solid leather belt (or any thick leather). Cut small squares, but not too small, 1 for each arming point. Punch 2 holes for point in the middle and as many holes you like along the edges for sewing onto your gambeson.

This way you don't have to punch a hole in the fabric of the gambeson. If you do it will likely tear sooner or later. And if you change your setup you can easily remove the leather patch and place it somewhere else.


Thanks for the reply friend. So the cord just go into one hole and come out the other? Like sewing only the edge of the leather to the cloth and leave the middle hollow right?
View user's profile Send private message
Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 2:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thats correct. I added a picture of my arming jacket point to clarify.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 2:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I really appreciate your help mate.
View user's profile Send private message
Jeffrey Faulk




Location: Georgia
Joined: 01 Jan 2011

Posts: 578

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 9:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some folks like to do pretty little brass or tin pointy bits at the ends of the cords. Not really necessary but they do help keep the ends from fraying and give you just a bit of 'bling'...

View user's profile Send private message
Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 4:02 pm    Post subject: Arming points         Reply with quote

You don't need to punch holes in arming garments, use a sailors spike or a large awl to ease apart the threads without breaking them, then whip or blanket stitch around the edges to reenforce them. There are a few guides out there or get a copy of the museum of london clothing book, it's got some good instructions plus masses of other helpful info.

The aiglets on the end of the points will pass through the point holes easily.

Best bet is wear it and have a friend place your armour over the top and mark where the holes need to go, don't do it yourself.
View user's profile Send private message
W. Scott Brown





Joined: 20 Jun 2013

Posts: 39

PostPosted: Fri 10 Jan, 2014 9:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd like to second the thought that you shouldn't punch holes in your garment. Historically I think a bone awl was used to separate the fabric fibers and sew an eyelet where permanent lacing was needed.

However, I would also like to point out an alternative pointing method used by an acquaintance of mine who's experienced in wearing armor, Ian LaSpina. He uses a leather tab, but instead of sewing it onto the garment, he uses the pointing lace itself to secure the tab in place using the eyelets as anchor points:



It's the same method I'll be using to secure the new armor being made for me by Jeffrey Hildebrandt of Royal Oak Armory.


.
View user's profile Send private message
Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Sat 11 Jan, 2014 3:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Most interesting, thanks guys!
View user's profile Send private message
Ian S LaSpina




Location: Virginia, US
Joined: 01 Jun 2010
Reading list: 5 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 301

PostPosted: Sun 12 Jan, 2014 12:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

W. Scott Brown wrote:
I'd like to second the thought that you shouldn't punch holes in your garment. Historically I think a bone awl was used to separate the fabric fibers and sew an eyelet where permanent lacing was needed.

However, I would also like to point out an alternative pointing method used by an acquaintance of mine who's experienced in wearing armor, Ian LaSpina. He uses a leather tab, but instead of sewing it onto the garment, he uses the pointing lace itself to secure the tab in place using the eyelets as anchor points:



.


Thanks for posting this, What you can't see is on the flip side of the garment I have 4 hand sewn eyelets that correspond to the holes punched in the leather tab. I elected to go with a 4 hole configuration because it just puts a little less stress on each individual eyelet. As someone mentioned above, none of the eyelets are cut in to the fabric, the hole is opened up with an awl and then sewn in place keeping the threads apart to hold the hole open permanently. I'm using two of these on each side of my pourpoint from which to suspend cuisses. Here's what it looks like from the front:



If you were going to use these for arms instead of legs, it would be easier to place the leather tab on the outside of the garment so the points are exposed from the outside. For cuisses I suspend from the inside because it allows the cuisse to sit snugly on my thigh and not bunch up the hem of my doublet. I don't have points on my arms because I point my arm harness directly to a maille haubergeon that I wear over the top of the pourpoint.

My YouTube Channel - Knyght Errant
My Pinterest
"Monsters are dangerous, and just now Kings are dying like flies..."
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Thu 16 Jan, 2014 8:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

did you makethat yourself Ian? Looks very nice.
View user's profile Send private message
Ian S LaSpina




Location: Virginia, US
Joined: 01 Jun 2010
Reading list: 5 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 301

PostPosted: Tue 21 Jan, 2014 5:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark Griffin wrote:
did you makethat yourself Ian? Looks very nice.


Yes sir! Thank you! You can read about the project here if you like:
http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=28169

My YouTube Channel - Knyght Errant
My Pinterest
"Monsters are dangerous, and just now Kings are dying like flies..."
View user's profile Send private message
Quinn W.




Location: Bellingham, WA
Joined: 02 May 2009

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Wed 22 Jan, 2014 1:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing this! I have a question though; if you were wearing mail under your plate, like say, for a transitional harness, would the arming points work about the same except that you would have to thread them through the mail rings? Or is there a different setup when you're dealing with a middle layer like that?
"Some say that the age of chivalry is past, that the spirit of romance is dead. The age of chivalry is never past, so long as there is a wrong left unredressed on earth"
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ian S LaSpina




Location: Virginia, US
Joined: 01 Jun 2010
Reading list: 5 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 301

PostPosted: Sat 25 Jan, 2014 7:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quinn W. wrote:
Thanks for sharing this! I have a question though; if you were wearing mail under your plate, like say, for a transitional harness, would the arming points work about the same except that you would have to thread them through the mail rings? Or is there a different setup when you're dealing with a middle layer like that?


Personally, I point my arms to the maille itself. If you're maille fits properly, it will not shift around and makes a perfectly stable platform for which to point you arm harness to. The legs remain unchanged, and point to my arming cote since maille wouldn't interfere or require you pull them through (my legs point to the inside of the cote).

My YouTube Channel - Knyght Errant
My Pinterest
"Monsters are dangerous, and just now Kings are dying like flies..."
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > How were arming points made on a gambson?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum