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Dan K. F.




Location: Calgary, Alberta
Joined: 12 Aug 2013
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PostPosted: Thu 26 Dec, 2013 5:27 pm    Post subject: FrogLube for blade care         Reply with quote

Is anyone familiar with using FrogLube for blade care? It's a product meant for firearms but I've read that it can be used on knives as well. I'm wondering if it might be a good alternative to regular oil while also being easier to apply than Renaissance Wax. Unfortunately I can't seem to find a list of ingredients anywhere so I can't be sure exactly how it works without trying it out.
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Peter Messent




Location: Texas
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PostPosted: Thu 26 Dec, 2013 8:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I use johnsons paste wax on metals and woods with decent results - cheap and will last a while! No experience with the froglube though.
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Thu 26 Dec, 2013 9:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Frog Lube is primarily a lubricant and a preservative second. I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work or be harmful to the weapon, but I see no reason to use it specifically. People tend to treat oiling their weapons like they're launching a space shuttle. Honestly, it's not that complicated. Any old medium weight oil will do the trick. An expensive gimmick compound like Frog Lube is an unneeded expense. Easier than Renaissance wax? I don't see the logic in that. Ren. Wax provides a much longer lasting protective barrier than oil. It also doesn't attract dust and moisture like oil. The initial application may take a bit longer, but it will also be much longer lasting than any oil and will not need to be applied as often.
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Dan K. F.




Location: Calgary, Alberta
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Dec, 2013 12:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was using Break-Free CLP before and it seemed to work fairly well. I think this is the same oil that Albion uses in-house which is why I went with it. The problem is I'd like to use the same CLP for regular folding knives I use to cut food when camping, hiking, etc. and Break-Free doesn't seem very edible. Are there any edible oils I can use that would also protect a blade?
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Dec, 2013 1:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan K. F. wrote:
I was using Break-Free CLP before and it seemed to work fairly well. I think this is the same oil that Albion uses in-house which is why I went with it. The problem is I'd like to use the same CLP for regular folding knives I use to cut food when camping, hiking, etc. and Break-Free doesn't seem very edible. Are there any edible oils I can use that would also protect a blade?


Are you folding knives made from something other than stainless?

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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Dec, 2013 7:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan K. F. wrote:
I was using Break-Free CLP before and it seemed to work fairly well. I think this is the same oil that Albion uses in-house which is why I went with it. The problem is I'd like to use the same CLP for regular folding knives I use to cut food when camping, hiking, etc. and Break-Free doesn't seem very edible. Are there any edible oils I can use that would also protect a blade?


Ballistol is edible.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Bjorn Hagstrom




Location: Höör, Skane
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Dec, 2013 7:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For my eating-knives (or any knife that will contact food) I just use what cooking oil is currently in my kitchen. Olive- Rapeseed- or Sunflower-oil are the usual ones. I actually use olive oil to grease down my replica weapons, helmets and armour pieces (do not have that many) just out of convenience. They spend 90% of the time hanging on my wall anyway.
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Eric W. Norenberg





Joined: 18 Jul 2008

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PostPosted: Fri 27 Dec, 2013 8:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:


Ballistol is edible.


The liquid form is technically non-toxic, being mostly mineral oil (probably shouldn't do straight shots of it, unless there's something "down there" that needs lubrication Wink ), but the aerosol likely uses butane or propane as a propellant, both carcinogenic.

Had to chime in on that.
-Eric
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Dan K. F.




Location: Calgary, Alberta
Joined: 12 Aug 2013
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Dec, 2013 10:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:


Are you folding knives made from something other than stainless?


I have two Gerber folders. The CLP is more to keep the folding mechanism working smoothly than to preserve the blades themselves.

Bjorn Hagstrom wrote:
For my eating-knives (or any knife that will contact food) I just use what cooking oil is currently in my kitchen. Olive- Rapeseed- or Sunflower-oil are the usual ones. I actually use olive oil to grease down my replica weapons, helmets and armour pieces (do not have that many) just out of convenience. They spend 90% of the time hanging on my wall anyway.


Do plant-based oils work as well as petroleum products? Wouldn't they be less durable and have to be reapplied more often? I understand very little about the chemistry behind the various oils used to protect metal so when it comes to maintenance I basically just do whatever others recommend Laughing Out Loud .
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Bjorn Hagstrom




Location: Höör, Skane
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PostPosted: Sat 28 Dec, 2013 7:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan K. F. wrote:

Do plant-based oils work as well as petroleum products? Wouldn't they be less durable and have to be reapplied more often? I understand very little about the chemistry behind the various oils used to protect metal so when it comes to maintenance I basically just do whatever others recommend Laughing Out Loud .


My experience is that plant based oils are generally thicker (lower viscosity) and do not form thin film as well as mineral oils. Can be remedied by warming the oil ever so slightly above room temperature. And yes, will have to be reapplied more frequently. But in the case with a folder in use, that is normal procedure due to being in constant use anyway.

For my not so frequently used stuff, the intervals change from maybe once a year to every six months or so..not inconvenientor enough for me to get a lubricant/preservative specifically for blunt blades and helmets instead of breaking out the olive oil.

But I don't have any firearms. For those who have break-free lying around anyway and it is not super-expensive, it's a no-brainer to use it for your blades.

It's all about creating a protective film to keep moisture and oxygen away from the metal. Any fat will do the trick, some are just more or less smelly, toxic, easy to apply, cheap or readily available Happy

Oh, and one other trick for eating knives. If you bring a nice fat piece of smoked pork as a snack, just cutting slices of taht will keep your blade nice and greasy without any extra effort!

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