Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Question about 16th century pauldrons Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Edward Jeagal




Location: Australia
Joined: 21 Oct 2013

Posts: 6

PostPosted: Mon 21 Oct, 2013 6:44 am    Post subject: Question about 16th century pauldrons         Reply with quote

Hi, first time poster here and hopeful to stick around for much longer. Anyways I've got a question I've wanted to ask about 16th century pauldrons, usually around the mid to the late parts of the century. As seen in the attachment, I'm curious on how they allowed the man inside to raise his arms in all sorts of directions. I've never seen 16th century plate armour beyond pictures so apologies if I seem to be asking a real dumb question.


 Attachment: 156.09 KB
464581.jpg


Those willing to die will live, and those willing to live will die.
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Tue 22 Oct, 2013 2:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Simply, if the shaping/geometry is right, they work. The surviving numbers of these harnesses is testament to that, armour that doesn't work is unlikely to carry on for decades like these do.

I own and work in something similar and never had a problem, they float about nicely and if I do need to raise an arm they interact with the helmet well. The right one is always shorter, its going to do the most movement simply due to the fact you don't want to pull your left, rein, arm about too much, but you can if needs must.

I admit they do look like a hindrance, but they work v well.
View user's profile Send private message
Edward Jeagal




Location: Australia
Joined: 21 Oct 2013

Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue 22 Oct, 2013 4:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply! Yeah, from the pics I've seen and the fact that nobody I know wears 16th century plate armour of any kind, I was curious to how they functioned. From pics alone, it looks like the arms can only move sideways but I know that's wrong because that would be a terrible stupid hindrance.
Those willing to die will live, and those willing to live will die.
View user's profile Send private message
Kai Lawson




Location: Madison, WI
Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Likes: 7 pages

Posts: 482

PostPosted: Tue 22 Oct, 2013 8:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roughly how many degrees of motion in front or behind you would you say one could achieve with, say, the pauldrons pictured? I know that each set would be tailored to the breast and back and the size of the individual, so the amount would vary, but I'm curious about flexibility and ROM of tourney armor with a two-handed sword--not a polearm (think Henry's tourney armor). A polearm will be held differently at times that a large sword--does the mostly vertical compression of the lames allow for decent horizontal compression of the arms, to allow for the blade to be held directly in front of the body? Of course the stance would have to be modified, but I am wondering by how much...


 Attachment: 126.1 KB
Henry-VIII---II.7.jpg


"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
View user's profile Send private message
Matthew Goode




Location: TX
Joined: 04 Oct 2012

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue 22 Oct, 2013 8:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You can move around a bit actually. I mean you can't do a 360 circle or roll up in a ball, but you still have a large amount of mobility.
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Tue 22 Oct, 2013 10:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Somewhere online, even on the RA site maybe, there must be a video of the reconstruction of those tonlet armourers in action. admittedly they are not tailored to fit an individual (at the time they were made the Armouries had a large interpretation team and it was made to suit a few people) so they don't work 100% as good as the original but they could be described as pretty functional, if not totally perfect. as for exact ROM, I couldn't give specifics.

As they are different from the norm i think they took a bit of getting used to but as for the original, Henry would have wanted an armour he could move, work and show off in.
View user's profile Send private message
Edward Jeagal




Location: Australia
Joined: 21 Oct 2013

Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue 22 Oct, 2013 7:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark Griffin wrote:
Somewhere online, even on the RA site maybe, there must be a video of the reconstruction of those tonlet armourers in action.


There's one video I've found on Henry's tonlet armour (doesn't have much 'action' though)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oi9_FHQVr7g

I'm not too sure about the size of the pauldrons in this video (action starts at 2:45). However one of the fighters seems to be using spaulders and besagues.
http://youtu.be/YPKrAfww79U?t=2m45s

Those willing to die will live, and those willing to live will die.
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Question about 16th century pauldrons
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum