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Nate C.




Location: Palo Alto, CA
Joined: 13 Jun 2004

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PostPosted: Tue 14 Dec, 2004 12:14 pm    Post subject: Sword Display Materials & Placement         Reply with quote

Hello all,

I will soon have a sword to display and my question is this: Are there any materials that should be avoided when making a display stand/plaque/?? ? I have heard that some woods are too acidic to use in contact with steel. Is this true? Also, I'm thinking of mounting it above my fireplace which sees a lot of use during the winter. Would this heat cause any problems?

Thanks for your input,

Nate C.

Sapere Aude
"If you are going to kill the man, at least give him a decent salute." - A. Blansitt

If they ever come up with a Swashbuckling School, I think one of the courses should be Laughing, then Jumping Off Something. --Jack Handy
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
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PostPosted: Tue 14 Dec, 2004 12:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you mount it above the fireplace you'll have to make sure you remove it before the fireplace is used. If not the heat will really dry out the organic components of the sword.
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Nate C.




Location: Palo Alto, CA
Joined: 13 Jun 2004

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PostPosted: Tue 14 Dec, 2004 1:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sigh, that's what I thought Worried . And I was this close to having a FUNCTIONAL sword over the mantlepiece Big Grin [ever seen those fake Mad shield/sword thingies?]. keep the input coming.
Nate C.

Sapere Aude
"If you are going to kill the man, at least give him a decent salute." - A. Blansitt

If they ever come up with a Swashbuckling School, I think one of the courses should be Laughing, then Jumping Off Something. --Jack Handy
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Joel Whitmore




Location: Simmesport, LA
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 342

PostPosted: Wed 15 Dec, 2004 6:54 am    Post subject: Woods         Reply with quote

Avoid oak touching the sword as it has lots fo tanic acid in it (ever heard of oak-tanned leather). Also I woudl avoid sappy woods such as pine. Historical scabbard-makers used poplar a lot and I think this would be a good choice; it has a straight grain, is light and no acids.

Joel Whitmore
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Nate C.




Location: Palo Alto, CA
Joined: 13 Jun 2004

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Posts: 301

PostPosted: Wed 15 Dec, 2004 9:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Joel Big Grin , that's just the kind of info I was looking for. Are there any other woods besides poplar that would work? I would guess that hickory would be okay (spear shafts) and I've seen maple used for scabbards before. What about cherry or walnut?

Cheers,

Nate C.

Sapere Aude
"If you are going to kill the man, at least give him a decent salute." - A. Blansitt

If they ever come up with a Swashbuckling School, I think one of the courses should be Laughing, then Jumping Off Something. --Jack Handy
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Joel Whitmore




Location: Simmesport, LA
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 342

PostPosted: Thu 16 Dec, 2004 6:27 am    Post subject: Wood         Reply with quote

Nate C. wrote:
Thanks Joel Big Grin , that's just the kind of info I was looking for. Are there any other woods besides poplar that would work? I would guess that hickory would be okay (spear shafts) and I've seen maple used for scabbards before. What about cherry or walnut?

Cheers,


Nate I am not sure about cherry or walnut. They are both very hard and seem to seal very well. Oak is beautiful but it has lots of acid in it. Next time you have oak sawdust on cocrete, put some water on it watch the dark stain that appears! I am no master woodworker, but I would venture to say that most woods, properly sealed and polyurethaned would be safe. If you have doubts, you can always glue a felt strip where the blade touches the wood and put some mineral oil on it. This seems to work well for me. Someone suggested once to try clear acrylic hangers. I think that would look great but I haven't gotten around to it.

Joel

P.S. This link may be of some help: http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/htdocs/chemical%20dyeing.htm
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Sean Flynt
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myArmoury Team

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PostPosted: Thu 16 Dec, 2004 7:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I made the stand for the CSA sword and belt shown below in about an hour with two rectangular pine plaques from Hobby Lobby and a short piece of .25" x 3" poplar craft wood from Lowes. You just shape the top of a piece of the poplar and mount it vertically on the plaque (glue & nails or scews). Sand everything, of course. I used thin strips of chamois to line the part of the wood where the sword rests, but that could lead to rust (for those of you concerned about such matters Wink ). The poplar uprights are shaped like right triangles, with straight backs and a sloping front of approx 70 degrees. The sword rests are made separately so they can be precisely adjusted to suit the weapon. They look great painted and the little gutter around the edge of the plaque is perfect for contrasting color (in this case, the scheme is CSA gray with officer's gold accent). Very simple, very inexpensive and very effective.


 Attachment: 97.92 KB
DSCN0937.JPG


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)


Last edited by Sean Flynt on Thu 16 Dec, 2004 6:23 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Gary Venable




Location: Kansas City
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Thu 16 Dec, 2004 8:33 am    Post subject: Re: Wood         Reply with quote

Joel Whitmore wrote:
I am no master woodworker, but I would venture to say that most woods, properly sealed and polyurethaned would be safe.


I would agree with Joel on this. I have built several Display's using oak and once the are properly stained and sealed there is really not much risk. In face the display bookcases I built for my swords http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?p...ght=#20985 are made of oak and cause me no concern for my collection.

Gary
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Sean Flynt
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myArmoury Team

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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2004 7:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For what it's worth, here's the design for my poplar sword stand


 Attachment: 98.41 KB
stand.jpg


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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