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Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 11:37 am    Post subject: Danziger handgonne. New boomstick!         Reply with quote

Finally got around to finding a good handgonne. This one is a fairly good replica of the Danziger handgonne. Everything is handmade and cast from quality bronze. For safety the gun is lined with a hydraulic steel pipe. The pole is actually pine but from ancient slow growing high altitude trees so it's density is probably higher than oak.



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Chad Arnow
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 12:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's really cool. Who made it? I've often thought of having an early gonne in my collection.
Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 12:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's made by a Danish craftsman: http://bronzeart.dk/
The gun is not featured on their website but you can see the diversity of their work. Very high end and authentic casting methods.
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Ian Hutchison




Location: Louisiana / Nordrhein-Westholland
Joined: 27 Nov 2007

Posts: 488

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 1:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very neat. Let us know what kind of accuracy you can get out of it!
'We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.' - Adrian Carton de Wiart
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Thomas R.




Location: Germany
Joined: 10 May 2010
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 1:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, that's a pretty cool hunk of metal! Please make a video of your test shootings!

Have good time,
Thomas

http://maerenundlobebaeren.tumblr.com/
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Tim Lison




Location: Chicago, Illinois
Joined: 05 Aug 2004
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 4:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is just so cool! Would love to see a pic of you holding it like it should be held to fire. I'm having a hard time understanding how that was done...I assume that it would be held under the arm with one hand and lit with the other?
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J. Hargis




Location: Pacific Palisades, California
Joined: 06 Feb 2012
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 5:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tim Lison wrote:
That is just so cool! Would love to see a pic of you holding it like it should be held to fire. I'm having a hard time understanding how that was done...I assume that it would be held under the arm with one hand and lit with the other?

Indeed, this is relatively new territory for me. I too would like to learn more about the use and details of such a weapon.

Jon

A poorly maintained weapon is likely to belong to an unsafe and careless fighter.
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Jason Daub




Location: Peace River, Alberta
Joined: 14 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 6:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Most of the period illustrations that I have seen show the smaller handgonnes being used in a manner similar to that of the crossbow. The trail goes over the right shoulder, left hand supporting, and the match is applied with the right. That being said, many other illustrations show the trail held underarm, others show the trail being butted to the ground for higher angle fire, or perhaps recoil mitigation from larger handgonnes.
'I saw young Harry, -with his bevor on,
His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm'd,-
Rise from the ground like feather'd Mercury,
And vaulted with such ease into his seat,
As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds,
To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus,
And witch the world with noble horsemanship.'
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Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Wed 24 Jul, 2013 1:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A few pics of the alternatives I've seen in illustrations. With a linstock I can reach the touchhole from any position. Some people say the gun was fused, others say the touchhole was primed with gun powder. From people who have shot a lot of handgonnes I've been told that the most accurate technique is the hip-shot. Instinctive shooting that is, like throwing a snowball or shooting an arrow from a medieval bow. I also recommend this page for additional nerd levels: http://musketeer.ch/blackpowder/bp_menu.html

High stance:


Under arm:


Shooting from the hip:


Volley shot. Handgonnes also shot arrows similar to crossbow bolts.
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Tim Lison




Location: Chicago, Illinois
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Jul, 2013 4:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the excellent photos of the firing poses! The "from the hip" pose does seem to make the most sense. Great kit too. I don't know why I hadn't thought of it before but as I looked at the photos it occured to me that the handgonne could also be quite a good melee weapon if needed! This piece is just soooooo cool! Congrats again!
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Julian Reynolds




Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 30 Mar 2008

Posts: 271

PostPosted: Thu 25 Jul, 2013 1:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Other period methods of igniting these things are a red hot metal wire, kept in a brazier (when shooting from a fortified position such as battlements, for instance). As well as, of course, the ubiquitous slowmatch. Later versions had a simple long pivoted iron lever nailed to the side of the stock, with the slowmatch clamped on the end, which allowed the slowmatch tip to be dropped onto the touchhole.

There are versions with a projection (a 'hook') cast into the barrel and projecting downwards. These gave rise to the term 'hackbut' (from hackenbuchse or hook-gun). This was used to steady the barrel against a fortification or a pavise, but were also useful for turning it into a percussive weapon (polearm) once the shot was fired. Below is an unusual double one*

It has been show through the diligence of reenactors, that using hand-made period-type slow-burning powder, there is sufficient time to light the priming charge, return both hands to the grip and 'adjust' your aim before the main charge goes off, making them more accurate than you would expect (or could recreate with modern, fast-burning powder which is almost intantaneous).

A very good resource for in-depth discussion of period handgonnes is the European Armoury section of the Vikingsword forum: (the below being one of many, many topics on the subject)
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?...light=1481

*photo taken from vikingsword forum



 Attachment: 18.01 KB
Double Handgonne 1420 1.jpg

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Philip Dyer





Joined: 25 Jul 2013

Posts: 494

PostPosted: Thu 25 Jul, 2013 10:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tim Lison wrote:
Thanks for the excellent photos of the firing poses! The "from the hip" pose does seem to make the most sense. Great kit too. I don't know why I hadn't thought of it before but as I looked at the photos it occured to me that the handgonne could also be quite a good melee weapon if needed! This piece is just soooooo cool! Congrats again!

How many guns have you shot?
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