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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
Joined: 16 Mar 2013

Posts: 21

PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 7:07 am    Post subject: Deepeeka Triple Lobed Godfred         Reply with quote

Hello everyone, i saw this on Kult of Athena and was wondering if anyone had any experience with this sword Triple Lobed Godfred Sword - AH6966.
i know Deepeeka has a bad rep but this didnt look too bad.. maybe a few upgrades but other then that, i wonder how is the heat treat and PoB, etc..
any info
thanks in advance
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 7:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Except the diamond cross section at the tip, it doesn't look bad. It even has two piece pommel with rivets.
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
Joined: 16 Mar 2013

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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 7:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

from the pics on KoA.. it looks very nice and a good starter or fixer upper.
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 8:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The question is is it heat treated and how well...
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
Joined: 16 Mar 2013

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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 8:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

is it new? i visit the KoA site frequently and have never noticed.. maybe because i shy away from deepeeka but to me it looks good.. but looks are not everything in the sword world which i recently found out
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
Joined: 16 Mar 2013

Posts: 21

PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 8:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

.. another thing too is that on the site it doesnt say the whole blurb about "Although ''battle ready'' by virtue of the type of steel and construction, etc etc etc...."

hmmmmmmmm Question
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P. Schontzler




Location: WA, USA
Joined: 15 Apr 2013

Posts: 99

PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 9:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's MUCH lighter than their other swords too! Looks very nice.... Big Grin
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Tom King




Location: florida
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 10:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

the company got bought by some scandinavian guy; hence the primus line and a major overhaul in the fit, finish, balance, and temper of new deepeeka products. Hopefully they'll jump on the hole left by the "hanwie practical" and create some rebated swords for HEMA and BOTN style combat.
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 10:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

im very curious about this sword.. i am almost tempted to buy it and see whats the deal on it!
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Greg Ballantyne




Location: Maryland USA
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 10:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm not saying the following statement applies in this case, but at times you have to take weights listed on KOA with a grain of salt. I say this because the Gen 2 River Witham is listed on KOA as 4 lbs, on the Legacy Arms site as 3 lbs 1.4 oz, and on the CAS Hanwei site (Hanwei recently acquired Gen 2) as 3.3 lbs, or 3 lbs 4.8 oz. I have a Gen 2 River Witham, and my inaccurate method of weighing it results in 3 lbs 6.4 oz. My weight on a digital scale holding the sword vs. not holding the sword. Not a difference significant to the Deepeeka weight involved in this discussion though. Looking at the Deepeeka Viking Long sword AH4101M that KOA lists at 4 lbs 7 oz, the Triple Lobed Godfred compares well at 2 lb 7.8 oz. Of course the Godfred actually looks more like a Viking sword reproduction, where the Long Sword does not. Deepeeka's Gallowglass, listed at 6 lbs 5.8 oz looks to be quite the crowbar. I never gave Deepeeka a second glance before either. It would be interesting to see the Godfred in person.
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 10:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

On the Deepeeka site, it says its "New for 2012"
its listed as EN45 High Carbon Spring Steel. is this the same as their old swords? Ive been looking at all the others and this one "looks" far superior then their previous offerings.
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 11:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like this one even more, it looks quite right: http://www.deepeeka.com/armoury/documents/sho...t=Medieval
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 11:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Have you gents seen these before?
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 11:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

No. And I would order that type H if I were not in Croatia. Shipping and taxes would easily cost me as much as a sword itself...
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P. Schontzler




Location: WA, USA
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 12:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The fuller seems to end a little abruptly, or is it just me?
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 12:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

not too bad.. i think its a good project/starter sword that can be customized if the blade is good to go!
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Peter Messent




Location: Texas
Joined: 03 Jan 2009

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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 1:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would also like to hear about HT. If the HT is good, that's very cheap for what it is.

A few complaints; I've been looking at all the swords on the Deepeeka website, and a few things jumped out at me:

The fullers are all narrow. not as narrow as some later swords, but I would view them as bordering narrow on a Viking sword. As a matter of personal preference, I like to have the fuller about half as wide as the blade, but a third at least.
I also agree that it looks like the fuller ends square with the guard rather than continuing past it.


Despite having a two-part pommel, the construction is not authentic. Instead of riveting the upper guard to the tang and the pommel to the upper guard, the pommel appears to be riveted to the tang and the upper guard to the pommel. To me, that is weirder than just using a one-part pommel with fake rivets cast onto it. They went to all the effort of making a two part pommel and then put it together weird Confused depending on how well the peened tang fits the pommel, this could be remedied with some grinding and polishing, which on some of the swords will be necessary anyway as the pommels don't all seem very well formed.


Those minor (to some) gripes aside, their scabbards are looking good (hopefully wood, or at least hard-something cored?) and some of them have authentic u-shaped chapes, and some leather chapes which I know not everybody likes, but it is a reasonable historical material. The strap bridges looked good too.

If these are all in the $100-200 region, I'll be buying a few I think. Project swords are more fun anyway.

Pete

PS: Definitely projects, nice as the Hersir sword looks I just noticed the hexagonal cross section at the tip!
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 8:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Messent wrote:
Despite having a two-part pommel, the construction is not authentic. Instead of riveting the upper guard to the tang and the pommel to the upper guard, the pommel appears to be riveted to the tang and the upper guard to the pommel. To me, that is weirder than just using a one-part pommel with fake rivets cast onto it. They went to all the effort of making a two part pommel and then put it together weird Confused depending on how well the peened tang fits the pommel, this could be remedied with some grinding and polishing, which on some of the swords will be necessary anyway as the pommels don't all seem very well formed.


I believe you can find examples of two part pommels were the tang goes through both pieces. I've heard that mentioned on these forums before.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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Jason Torres




Location: Virginia
Joined: 16 Mar 2013

Posts: 21

PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 8:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Messent wrote:

Despite having a two-part pommel, the construction is not authentic. Instead of riveting the upper guard to the tang and the pommel to the upper guard, the pommel appears to be riveted to the tang and the upper guard to the pommel. To me, that is weirder than just using a one-part pommel with fake rivets cast onto it. They went to all the effort of making a two part pommel and then put it together weird Confused depending on how well the peened tang fits the pommel, this could be remedied with some grinding and polishing, which on some of the swords will be necessary anyway as the pommels don't all seem very well formed.


Those minor (to some) gripes aside, their scabbards are looking good (hopefully wood, or at least hard-something cored?) and some of them have authentic u-shaped chapes, and some leather chapes which I know not everybody likes, but it is a reasonable historical material. The strap bridges looked good too.

If these are all in the $100-200 region, I'll be buying a few I think. Project swords are more fun anyway.

Pete

PS: Definitely projects, nice as the Hersir sword looks I just noticed the hexagonal cross section at the tip!


im pretty new here so i am not sure how to picture the construction you describe here.

is EN45 steel good for swords.? i have seen mixed reviews about it
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Peter Messent




Location: Texas
Joined: 03 Jan 2009

Posts: 226

PostPosted: Sat 27 Apr, 2013 8:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
I believe you can find examples of two part pommels were the tang goes through both pieces. I've heard that mentioned on these forums before.


I stand corrected! I'll have to look that up; I can't help but wonder if that would be later viking age or possibly more baltic in origin. I had heard of examples that were, aesthetically, very similar to the more Scandinavian varients, but differing in aspects such as the pommel construction.

Jason - that's a kinda subjective question. A lot of people don't like it on knives, because it can be brittle at higher hardness (custom knives & woodworking knives often go from about 58 up to about 62 on the rockwell scale) but it does get used quite extensively for swords and larger, chopping knives where a hardness of below 55 (I think a good spring temper for En45 is right around 54?) is more suitable. I think it's used more in the UK than here in the US. I recall I had a John Barnett sword in EN45 for a while. The sword was trash, but I can't deny that the blade was extremely tough. As with any steel, if they pushed the heat treatment too hard, it could be brittle - if they tempered it too much, it could be too soft. If they got it 'just so' (which they should have - heat treatment is an extremely predictable and repeatable process) then it should be a fine blade, so long as it's ground right!

I'll whip up a quick drawing of typical Viking sword construction and post it up here to better explain what I mean about that.

Hope that helps,
Pete


Last edited by Peter Messent on Sat 27 Apr, 2013 10:47 pm; edited 1 time in total
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