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Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Crusader Monk: Windlass Type XIV - Melt Job Reply to topic
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JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Tue 16 Oct, 2012 12:35 pm    Post subject: Crusader Monk: Windlass Type XIV - Melt Job         Reply with quote

One of the biggest problems with imported productions swords is that they are almost nice swords, but lack a few odds and ends to make them better. Years of collecting firearms gave me an idea. For many years, gunsmiths offered melt jobs as a customization for firearms. What the melting does is round off all the hard corners and edges to make the weapon more concealable and give it a better aesthetic. I got to thinking, what if I were to melt job a sword like one of these gunsmiths?

I started out with a fairly popular piece, a Windlass Type XIV. I acquired the sword from the Museum Replicas showroom on the discounted rack for only $100. The only problems with the sword were a loose crossguard and some slight rust. This sword has been around for several years now, and it's a great little blade for the money. One on the things which I have always found to be a bother on the Windlass Type XIV is how acute the angles are on the piece. The edges are far too sharp, which is a problem with many inexpensive production blades. These 90 degree edges give the sword a mechanical stamped appearance, whereas many quality hand-crafted swords bear edges which are every so slighlty rounded.

First, let's look at a standard Windlass Type XIV below with no alterations to the angles:



Now, onto changing the product...

On the melt job sword, I tightened the guard, removed the stock grip, and reprofiled the grip core to a smoother shape. I then worked with a file to reprofile all of the hard edges on the sword, giving them a slight bevel. This bevel is more pronounced at the ends of the cross to make it look a bit more dramatic. I then finished the edges with various grits of sanding, until I had worked the finish to an even 600 grit. The blade surface and all of the flat surfaces on the sword were also finished to 600 grit.

The grip was given two central oversized risers to enhance the whole theme of the sword, which is a gently, slightly noticable melted look. Even though the difference is slight, the overall aesthetic of the sword has been greatly improved to give it a look of much higher quality. This is my personal Windlass Type XIV, and I really like the overall results.

I look forward on being able to try melt jobs on some other swords in the near future! Happy
















J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
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Josh Wilson




Location: WV
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PostPosted: Tue 16 Oct, 2012 3:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks good! How did you tighten up the cross guard?
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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Tue 16 Oct, 2012 3:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

HUGE improvement! That looks great! Cool idea too.
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John Giles




Location: Northwest Florida
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PostPosted: Thu 18 Oct, 2012 10:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Brilliant!! Great job!! It does give it a much more "expensive" look!!!
True Courage is about knowing not when to take a life, but when to spare one.
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JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Thu 18 Oct, 2012 1:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for all the compliments. Happy

I did the finishing touch today by fixing two York Silver Pennies into the pommel recesses. Before adding the coins, I darkened the recess to make the coins stand out a little bit more.



Loving this little blade now... Big Grin

J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Thu 18 Oct, 2012 2:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice work/aesthetics and also has practical value in making the sword more ergonomic and comfortable in the hand.
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Thu 18 Oct, 2012 5:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Your work has really improved the look of this sword quite significantly!
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Carl W.




Location: usa
Joined: 07 Aug 2008

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PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct, 2012 3:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

JE - well done upgrade, way better. Is anything actually melted or the name is slang?

Couple days ago I was thinking to comment to maybe consider something decorative in the pommel. Nice coins.
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JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Sat 20 Oct, 2012 11:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Carl W. wrote:
JE - well done upgrade, way better. Is anything actually melted or the name is slang?

Couple days ago I was thinking to comment to maybe consider something decorative in the pommel. Nice coins.


Oh, nothing's actually melted. It's all file, sanding, and buffing. It's just something people started calling smoothed-out firearms. Removing the edges makes them nicer to concealed carry because they don't snag on clothing and such. Happy

J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
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JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Sun 28 Oct, 2012 1:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is the scabbard I just finished up for this one. As I am keeping it, I have not added a suspension yet, but when I do, it will probably be along the lines of an angled belt or simple frog. I kept the theme very simple for the most part, to better enhance the sword hilt.












J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
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