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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
Joined: 19 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 2:21 pm    Post subject: Re-creating 14th/15th century eating knives - first attempts         Reply with quote

I´m posting some pictures of my first attempts to re-create 14th/15th century eating knives. handles made of rose-wood (2) and bone (1). some lessons learnt, next time it shall be better Happy


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Julien M




Location: Austin TX
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 2:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

These have style an nice proportions, and look every bit like period artifacts. I like it, great first attempt!
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Scott Woodruff





Joined: 30 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 2:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Indeed those are projects to be proud of. You have an excellent sense of proportion, and your knives really look like the real deal. You mentioned some lessons learned, care to share?
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Thomas R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 2:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

They do look definitely period. Well done. Someday I hope to try this at home, too. Happy
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Leo Todeschini
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Location: Oxford, UK
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 4:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Good work Radovan, keep it up.

As Julien says, for first attempts they are really good, so you should probably change the word' attempts' to 'successes'.

Tod

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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 6:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leo Todeschini wrote:
Good work Radovan, keep it up.

As Julien says, for first attempts they are really good, so you should probably change the word' attempts' to 'successes'.

Tod


I agree very much with Leo and the other commenters who remark that these look very period and considering how good Leo is at making swords/knives/and everything else Medieval he makes, this is a great compliment and for a first project amazing work.

More details about the way there where made and lessons learned would be very welcome. Wink Big Grin

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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Sep, 2012 10:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thanks for kind words. I have to say, Mr Todeschini´s work is a great source of inspiration, and several pictures of the works he posted on this forum are hanging in my workshop:)
As for the lessons learnt the biggest knife (the middle one, on the second picture) ended up too "heavy". I´ve made the scales too thick, so in the end the whole handle has somewhat "square" cross-section, whereas historical peaces seem to be more "flat". Also, I feel it would handle better, were it little bit less robust.
the other thing concerns fitting of metal and wooden/bone parts of the scales: gapping sebetweenhem are far too wide, and it´s visible on a delicate small piece as an eating knife. Next time I shall spend much more time with details.
In the end, I also did not like the combination of iron scales and brass rivets on the "robust" knife. The easiest option would be using rivets from the same metal, but I wanted to make it little bit more decorative. Let´s see, I will probably check some books, not to re-invent the wheel.
Last but not least, despite everything I´ve read on this forum, I´ve tried to make scabbards for a single layer of thick leather, but it did not work well. They are too "rough". So next time: two layers, with thinner, finer leather on the outer side.
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Thomas R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Sep, 2012 12:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What do you mean with the sheaths being too rough? Do you mean their general appearances or their feel to the hand? If it's the latter, well, you have to use a folding bone on them, while the leather is drying. You sweep with the bone gently over the leather, so it will get a shiny feel and look. After drying apply some bees wax balm to nourish the leather, and it should have a smooth feeling to the hand and fine shine to the eye.

Regards,
Thomas

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Sep, 2012 1:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thomas R. wrote:
If it's the latter, well, you have to use a folding bone on them, while the leather is drying. You sweep with the bone gently over the leather, so it will get a shiny feel and look. After drying apply some bees wax balm to nourish the leather, and it should have a smooth feeling to the hand and fine shine to the eye.


In English, that's known as burnishing the leather.

Cheers

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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Sep, 2012 3:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

no, by "rough" i mean their overall shape, appearance. the leather I´ve used had pretty smooth finish on the outer side. but I think you can work much finer details on the thinner leather, so next time I will follow advices from this forum, make hard core from a thick leather, and then coat it with finer, thin leather. "next time" might actually be quite soon, as friend of mine is getting married in 4 weeks and I need a good gift:)
anyway, thanks for a good advice on burnishing!
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