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Paul Watson




Location: Upper Hutt, New Zealand
Joined: 08 Feb 2006

Posts: 391

PostPosted: Wed 18 Jan, 2012 10:17 pm    Post subject: Albion Maximillian         Reply with quote

Albion has posted a photo on their Facebook page of Peter Johnsson holding up a Maximillian blade with completed waxes fitted. It is huge and scary looking.
I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, but that which it protects. (Faramir, The Two Towers)
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Wed 18 Jan, 2012 11:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

ooh, thank you, im very interested to see german 2 handers
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Chris Artman




Location: USA
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PostPosted: Thu 19 Jan, 2012 12:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Excellent, I heard that they were going to release that one soon... I have had one on order, so I look forward to it!!

I'll have to check the FB page...

Looks great, just saw the photo...
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Addison C. de Lisle




Location: South Carolina
Joined: 05 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Thu 19 Jan, 2012 1:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, that is a huge sword! The scale photos on Albion's website don't show how massive it is when compared to the human body. New Albion model infatuation starts about...now. Happy

Also, for those who don't have facebook here is the photo being referenced



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Nicholas A. Gaese




Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Joined: 06 Aug 2007

Posts: 100

PostPosted: Thu 19 Jan, 2012 2:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh ya my jaw dropped at the sight of this. I posted back in '07 asking about the demensions of the upcoming sword. Peter Johnsson told me that it was going to be about 140 cm or 55 inches in length. Now I know Peter is pretty tall so that makes me think they made it bigger than originally intended. For me this is a good thing even though I can't afford one for a looooong time to come Cry .

Still I can't wait to finally see it finished! Im completely psyched!




Regards.
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Paul Watson




Location: Upper Hutt, New Zealand
Joined: 08 Feb 2006

Posts: 391

PostPosted: Fri 20 Jan, 2012 10:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

On Albion Europes facebook page it confirms 140 cm long with a 104.5 cm hexagonal blade
I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, but that which it protects. (Faramir, The Two Towers)
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Matt Corbin




Location: U.S.A.
Joined: 16 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: Fri 20 Jan, 2012 10:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow! That is a beast Eek! But in an good way Big Grin
“This was the age of heroes, some legendary, some historical . . . the misty borderland of history where fact and legend mingle.”
- R. Ewart Oakeshott
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Fri 20 Jan, 2012 1:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i've been waiting to see developments about this sword. very excited to see the blade, can't wait until it's 'unveiled' in its entirety.
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Eric G.




Location: Arizona
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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jan, 2012 9:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you. That picture has made my weekend! I have really liked this sword for a long time. I alternate between coveting that one and the Tyrolean. I can't wait to see them both finished.
Eric Gregersen
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Chris Artman




Location: USA
Joined: 12 Apr 2008

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PostPosted: Sun 22 Jan, 2012 1:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've got the spot on one of the sword racks all picked out... Its going to complete on of my racks that has an open space. I had a place pre-planned for it. I don't think I ever posted pics of my custom sword rack project... They turned out great. I'll have to do that.

Its going to be right next to the Dane. The Svante, Brescia Spadona, and Cluny will also be on that same rack.

I have waiting spots on other racks for the Markgraf and the Principe (I chose the Principe over the Alexandra, but both seem very nice)

Looking forward to the Principe and Markgraf as well... Not sure what the ETA is on those.
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James J




Location: USA
Joined: 23 Jan 2012

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PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2012 2:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great looking sword!
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2012 5:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Paul Watson wrote:
On Albion Europes facebook page it confirms 140 cm long with a 104.5 cm hexagonal blade


the funny thing about that dimension is.. is that considerig the huge size of the german 2 handers at lutels, and in the graz armory.(one example is a full 190cm long). 140cm all of a sudden feels almost puny by comparison (as puny as agreat dirty 2 hander can ever possibly be)

by the way, i get that such a large blade seem a very hard thing to do correctly..
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Gregory J. Liebau




Location: Dinuba, CA
Joined: 27 Nov 2004

Posts: 669

PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2012 12:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Most of the reproductions being made by Lutel and those on display at the Graz are later 16th century designs, and are often associated (perhaps wrongly from time to time) with processional or display use. Many are too large and heavy to have been very effective in combat.

The Maximilian, on the other hand, is representative of a style which would have been popular among Landsknect's during the earlier part of the century, roughly from 1510-1540 or so. It would have been a highly agile and effective weapon compared to the monsters of later decades. Cheers!

-Gregory
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Peter Johnsson
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Location: Storvreta, Sweden
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PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2012 1:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dear forumites,

Thank you all for kind words and enthusiastic feedback. It is great to see that the Maximilian creates such response. To me personally, it is a good feeling knowing it will be reaching customers in a not too far away future.

On its size: It is a big sword that is certain. It does not represent those largest of swords, just like Gregory just remarked above. I attach a woodcut of a landsknecht carrying a weapon of the same general type, showing the scale of things. These swords tend to reach to the arm pit or the shoulder of the swordsman when placed with their point on the ground. Even if massive, they have a dynamic balance that make them pretty agile for their size. Many originals are surprisingly thin in the last part of the blade towards the point. This is a feature I have strived to make good use of in the design of the Maximilian. It has great effect of the responsiveness of the weapon.

I cannot at this moment provide you with more data on weight. I was in a hurry to get the waxes finally on their way to Albion, and forgot to take last notes of their weight. Stupid mistake. I am sure there will be more detailed information available as soon as we have the first prototype done.

In the image below, you can see that there is a dark section of the blade just below the guard. I think this is another example of a kind of leather sleeve that was sometimes made to cover the base of the blade. I wonder if this may not primarily have been intended to make carrying of the sword more practical. Possible there are benefits for this also in fighting, when using such a large sword in the varying conditions of the battle field, allowing one hand to grasp in front of the guard.



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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
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PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2012 1:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:
In the image below, you can see that there is a dark section of the blade just below the guard. I think this is another example of a kind of leather sleeve that was sometimes made to cover the base of the blade. I wonder if this may not primarily have been intended to make carrying of the sword more practical. Possible there are benefits for this also in fighting, when using such a large sword in the varying conditions of the battle field, allowing one hand to grasp in front of the guard.


Are leather sleeves more common in northern Europe than in southern Europe? Every bit of insulation will help when carrying one of these in winter. Or when grabbing the blade!

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Marik C.S.




Location: Germany
Joined: 16 Feb 2010

Posts: 163

PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2012 2:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Timo Nieminen wrote:

Are leather sleeves more common in northern Europe than in southern Europe? Every bit of insulation will help when carrying one of these in winter. Or when grabbing the blade!


Mr. Loades suggested in his book "Swords and Swordsmen" that those sleeves might be to keep rain from flowing down the blade and into the collar of the one carrying it, so such a thing would have its merits just about everywhere. Also fighting in winter - at least in terms of big battles - was quite rare, wasn't it?

Back to the sword.
That is a scary, scary beast. There are a couple of blades in our sparring group with similar lengths, even a little bit longer and when you attack one of those with a blade just 50" long you run into a problem when the opponent knows what he is doing. The problem is mainly, you run into the point when you try to get close enough to strike him

And if you have the point of the enemies blade disappearing from even your peripheral field of view while he is attacking that is really startling.

I'm really curious how the grip will look on this one once it's finished.

Europe - Where the History comes from. - Eddie Izzard
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

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PostPosted: Mon 13 Feb, 2012 2:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gregory J. Liebau wrote:
Most of the reproductions being made by Lutel and those on display at the Graz are later 16th century designs, and are often associated (perhaps wrongly from time to time) with processional or display use. Many are too large and heavy to have been very effective in combat.

The Maximilian, on the other hand, is representative of a style which would have been popular among Landsknect's during the earlier part of the century, roughly from 1510-1540 or so. It would have been a highly agile and effective weapon compared to the monsters of later decades. Cheers!

-Gregory


in the ARMA's article on 2 handed swords, theres a list of 69, 2 handed swords from the graz armoury,
i did some calculations, and i found of those 69, a great majority were of a length to weight ratio of between 18-20 grams/cm
and a majority, close to a third were between 170-179cm , and were mostly around the 3.5kg mark.

although from that list, one sword was a scary sort of featherweight at 185cm, and only 1.72kg.

length to weight ratiosare an obvious simplification, but the late 16th C 2hander's are clearly very hefty. although apparently are still relatively agile swords for their size.
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Chris Artman




Location: USA
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PostPosted: Wed 11 Apr, 2012 9:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mike contacted me about grip color. Looking forward to the first pics, possibly tomorrow if all goes well. If not pics will be up sometime very soon.

Looks like the first grip being made will be blue. I chose black unless for some reason another choice becomes appealing, but I liked black on the Dane as well. Looking forward to the final results.
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T. Arndt




Location: La Crosse, WI
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PostPosted: Wed 11 Apr, 2012 11:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm hoping for a review of this sword by someone who has handled the A&A 15th Century Two-handed Sword. I'm really interested in how they compare.
Wisconsin Historical Fencing Association (WHFA) - La Crosse
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Bill Grandy
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PostPosted: Wed 11 Apr, 2012 1:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I also got word about this sword. Mine might be in the first batch. I'm very excited about this one!

T. Arndt wrote:
I'm hoping for a review of this sword by someone who has handled the A&A 15th Century Two-handed Sword. I'm really interested in how they compare.


I can't tell you how they compare until I have the Maximillian, but I can tell you that the A&A one has quite a lot of blade presence, and isn't everyone's cup of tea. It's quite historical, and in fact I've handled a number of antiques that handle pretty much exactly like it, but it isn't what you'd call a "lively" blade. I personally love it, as it really is representative of many full sized two handed swords of the period, but it's not a weapon of subtlety. Happy

Virginia Academy of Fencing Historical Swordsmanship
--German Longsword & Italian Rapier in the DC Area--


"A despondent heart will always be defeated regardless of skill."
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