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Valentino Paolilla




Location: Yonkers, N.Y
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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 12:14 pm    Post subject: What is better steel for swords - 1075 or 6150?         Reply with quote

Albion is no longer using 1075 steel to make their sword's. They are now using 6150 steel. Mike told me that it is a great steel that they have perfected on, when it comes to heat treating. And also said that 6150 is a lil' better than 1075. I trust in Albions' word 100%; they are not known to let their customer's down. I would just like some feedback from you guy's...
Your tongue is your sword, & your mouth is your shield; what you say can stab you, & what you don't say can protect you...
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Tod Glenn




Location: Helena MT
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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 12:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

6150 has a lower carbon content than most sword steels (which are typically around 0.6%) and is used in gears and the like. It has high shock resistance and toughness. Typical sword steels are spring steels like 1060, 1065, 5160 and 9260. Every alloy is a compromise depending on what aspects you want to emphasis - many are mutually exclusive. Hardness, toughness and other properties are more or less desirable depending on the application and the maker.

I don't know that you can argue that this is necessarily better than other sword steels - just different. Time will tell if this is a good choice, but I suspect that Albion has done their testing and 6150 bests suits their requirements.
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Tod Glenn




Location: Helena MT
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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 12:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You might find the following explanation of steel grade helpful:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_steel_grades
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Bob Burns




Location: South Indianapolis IN
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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 2:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I believe Arms and Armor has been using 6150 for years and Ithey've been in business since 1982. I have bought a lot of Arms and Armor swords, always Outstanding quality!!!!! I've been told that. For European swords that it gets no better than 6150 is the best of them all!!!! I know this much though, all our Arms and Armor swords have terrific liveliness, they hold an edge extremely well!

Hope this helps!

Bob

It IS What It IS! Only In Truth, Can Reality Exist!
To "Learn" we must empty our minds and therefore open our mind and spirit. A wet sponge absorbs no water. A preconceived mind is recalcitrant to new knowledge!
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J. Helm




Location: WA, USA
Joined: 17 Jun 2011

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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 2:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Might there be any sought characteristic differences due to this change or would this likely be more of a process decision?
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Dustin R. Reagan





Joined: 09 May 2006

Posts: 264

PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 2:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tod Glenn wrote:
Every alloy is a compromise depending on what aspects you want to emphasis - many are mutually exclusive. Hardness, toughness and other properties are more or less desirable depending on the application and the maker.

I don't know that you can argue that this is necessarily better than other sword steels - just different. Time will tell if this is a good choice, but I suspect that Albion has done their testing and 6150 bests suits their requirements.


(my emphasis)

Well said. Agree 100%.
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Dustin R. Reagan





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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 2:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J. Helm wrote:
Might there be any sought characteristic differences due to this change or would this likely be more of a process decision?


Most likely both. 6150 has a slightly better "machinability" index (in the annealed condition), which should result in less wear and faster operation of their CNC process.

Furthermore, once heat-treated correctly, 6150 should be more shock-resistant, with better wear resistance than 1075 treated to similar RC hardness.

1070/75 can attain a higher RC hardness rating, though this is not really an issue (in my opinion) with larger blades. I'd probably prefer 1075 over 6150 for a small slicing knife.
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Dan Dickinson
Industry Professional



Location: Michigan
Joined: 03 Oct 2004

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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 5:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This thread has some good info:
http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t...mp;start=0
I hope this helps,
Dan
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Tod Glenn




Location: Helena MT
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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 5:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great thread which gives a lot of insight into Albion's decision. 6150 is, unlike 1070/1075, a deep hardening steel and is tougher than simple carbon at the same Rc. The requirements for a durable training sword (Maestro line) apparently drove the change. The reference to 2 salt baths seems to indicate marquencing, which will up the percentage of martensite without significantly effecting hardness.
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Jared Smith




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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 7:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's a very tough but modern heat treat process steel. "Has no equal" for tool holders and other tough duty applications. http://www.integritysteel.com/aisi-6150-mediu...steel.html

As such it is sort of a modern materials solution to optimizing "what could have been" in a historical material if everything had been just right.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Eric G.




Location: Arizona
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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 8:36 pm    Post subject: Re: What is better steel for swords - 1075 or 6150?         Reply with quote

Valentino Paolilla wrote:
Albion is no longer using 1075 steel to make their sword's. They are now using 6150 steel. Mike told me that it is a great steel that they have perfected on, when it comes to heat treating. And also said that 6150 is a lil' better than 1075. I trust in Albions' word 100%; they are not known to let their customer's down. I would just like some feedback from you guy's...


Any word from Albion on when they made this switch? Inquiring minds would be most interested to know...

Eric Gregersen
www.EricGregersen.com
Knowledge applied is power.
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Chad Arnow
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myArmoury Team

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PostPosted: Wed 27 Jul, 2011 8:40 pm    Post subject: Re: What is better steel for swords - 1075 or 6150?         Reply with quote

Eric Gregersen wrote:

Any word from Albion on when they made this switch? Inquiring minds would be most interested to know...


The thread linked above contains a discussion about their switch that dates from 2006.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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