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Myles Mulkey





Joined: 31 Jul 2008

Posts: 250

PostPosted: Mon 07 Feb, 2011 10:40 am    Post subject: Migration Camp Axes         Reply with quote

I was wondering what types of axes existed during the Migration Period. I am aware of the francisca, but that seems to be an exclusively war object (not that you couldn't chop wood with it, if you wanted to). I believe the Petersen type A and B axes are said to belong to the end of the Migration Period, but that they existed into the Viking Age as well. Anyone know of any non-francisca axes from the Frankish or Alamannic lands? How about in Scandinavia? Thanks.
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David Huggins




Location: UK
Joined: 25 Jul 2007

Posts: 490

PostPosted: Mon 07 Feb, 2011 11:14 am    Post subject: AXE         Reply with quote

Hi Myles

Certainly not a 'camp' iten, but still an interesting axe head which I thought might be of interest
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highligh...ammer.aspx

best
Dave

and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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Myles Mulkey





Joined: 31 Jul 2008

Posts: 250

PostPosted: Mon 07 Feb, 2011 2:33 pm    Post subject: Re: AXE         Reply with quote

David Huggins wrote:
Hi Myles

Certainly not a 'camp' iten, but still an interesting axe head which I thought might be of interest
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highligh...ammer.aspx

best
Dave
Pretty cool Dave! I also really like the 7th Century axe head. Also not a common tool item, but it is good to see some other forms. http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highligh..._silv.aspx

I am particularly curious as to the axe types a common farmer would be using. What types of axes were used to shape timbers for houses and ships (Petersen B's, or some form of broadaxe)? What would they have taken on a hunting expedition for firewood (Petersen A's)? These are the types of axes I'm interested in.
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Mark Routledge
Industry Professional



Location: UK
Joined: 03 May 2010

Posts: 56

PostPosted: Tue 08 Feb, 2011 8:46 am    Post subject: Re: AXE         Reply with quote

David Huggins wrote:
Hi Myles

Certainly not a 'camp' iten, but still an interesting axe head which I thought might be of interest
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highligh...ammer.aspx

best
Dave


Funney you should show that one Dave, got a template of it on my bench and one day I will get round to coming up with a reconstruction of sorts. Might involve an old head, a welder and a lot of grinding but I reckon the end result would look good on a longish handle. I understand one theory is it could be for use on horseback perhaps, could imagine it swung a bit like a polo mallet.........
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Jack W. Englund




Location: WA State
Joined: 17 Sep 2007
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 186

PostPosted: Tue 08 Feb, 2011 10:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

IMHO, this thread is GREAT. We oft times "neglect" to look @ the "tools".that were "critical" to everyday life.

We also, sometimes forget that these "Unitarian" tools were also used as primary Weapons through out history from the "stone age" to "modern times"


As an example, "hammer/axes" were very popular in the era that I do research in ( 1800s ( Amer) ) In fact they were were used as "camp axes" ( Short handled -building shelter, butchering, etc, etc., ) Plus very often carried/used used for personal defense.

Jack
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David Huggins




Location: UK
Joined: 25 Jul 2007

Posts: 490

PostPosted: Tue 08 Feb, 2011 12:53 pm    Post subject: Migration period axes         Reply with quote

Hi

The axe-hammer on the B.M.link I posted is often said to be derivitive from steppe cultures,theAvars and Allans are often named. Both the decorated axe-hammer and the axe that Mark posted are both pretty much unique finds within the British Isles for this period.

Hopefully if all has gone well, below are a some axe heads from the Vendel / Valsgarde inhumations.

and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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David Huggins




Location: UK
Joined: 25 Jul 2007

Posts: 490

PostPosted: Wed 09 Feb, 2011 2:23 am    Post subject: Migration period axes         Reply with quote

Obviously that never worked!! Thank to my mate, fellow forumite Bruce Tordoff for helping upload these images...cheers buddy

cheers
Dave



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and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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Ted Bouck




Location: Northe East Ohio
Joined: 04 Jul 2007

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Sun 20 Mar, 2011 6:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Dave,

Great pics thx!
Question, in the 4th picture, there is a sweet lookin three-pronged tool with a tang that I would guess is for a handle. Can you provide any more info about this tool? It almost looks like a 3-pronged garden rake.

The chain is also totally awesome too.
Thx, Ted
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David Huggins




Location: UK
Joined: 25 Jul 2007

Posts: 490

PostPosted: Mon 21 Mar, 2011 1:57 am    Post subject: Camp axe         Reply with quote

Hi Ted

I believe that it may be a 'flesh hook' probably used in cooking to remove meat cuts from a broiling pot or such similair..but that is just my opinon and it may have been used for something completely different.

best
Dave

and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Mar, 2011 5:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've seen one example of a very modern looking woodchopping axe from a viking museum exhibition catalogue I have access to. Looks exactly like the modern generic version being sold today. I'll have another look in that catalogue tonight and see if I can get it scanned and posted. Maybe not migration age, but just after it. I'll check out the dating.
"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Ted Bouck




Location: Northe East Ohio
Joined: 04 Jul 2007

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Mon 21 Mar, 2011 1:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ted Bouck wrote:
Hi Dave,

Great pics thx!
Question, in the 4th picture, there is a sweet lookin three-pronged tool with a tang that I would guess is for a handle. Can you provide any more info about this tool? It almost looks like a 3-pronged garden rake.

The chain is also totally awesome too.
Thx, Ted


Hi Dave,

That makes alot of sense, sort of like taking a fork and pulling a piece of rost beef off the huanch. Any idea on scale? I know it gives a proportion for scale.
Also, any info on the book this comes from would be apprectiated.
Again, Thanks!
Ted
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Peter O Zwart




Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: 28 Nov 2010

Posts: 69

PostPosted: Mon 21 Mar, 2011 5:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some of those ax heads look very much like some modern Gransfors Brooks log building mortise axes.

http://www.gransfors.com/htm_eng/produkter/bi...utyxa.html

and these modern forest axes

http://www.gransfors.com/htm_eng/index.html

Things don't seem to change much when you've got a good design eh?
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David Huggins




Location: UK
Joined: 25 Jul 2007

Posts: 490

PostPosted: Wed 23 Mar, 2011 9:39 am    Post subject: campaxes         Reply with quote

Hi Ted

Sorry for the delayed reply.The image is an illustration from ' Graffaltet vid Vendel' by H.J. Stolpe and T.J Arne 1912.
Unfortunetly I only have the copy as a pdf and can not relate the scale provided to actual size. The implement is not unique and can be found in other graves from the area. When Iget some time I'll have a look at the other Vendel/Valsgarde books and see if there is some indication of scale.

best
Dave

and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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Ted Bouck




Location: Northe East Ohio
Joined: 04 Jul 2007

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Thu 24 Mar, 2011 1:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thx David!
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Myles Mulkey





Joined: 31 Jul 2008

Posts: 250

PostPosted: Sun 01 May, 2011 9:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dave, this is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!
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