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Larry Bohnham





Joined: 20 May 2010

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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 8:56 am    Post subject: Experience with GDFB plate harnesses         Reply with quote

What have people's experiences been with either the Milanese or Cherbourgh plate armor offered by Get Dressed For Battle? How well do they fit and function? How's the build quality and durability? Also, what vendors out there are producing good plate?
"No athlete can fight tenaciously who has never received any blows; he must see his blood flow and hear his teeth crack under the fist of his adversary..."
Roger of Hoveden, d.1201

a furore Normannorum libera nos Domine

"Henry, get down off that horse with that sword, you'll put someone's eye out!" Mrs. Bolingbroke's advice to her son, Henry, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt
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Scott Hrouda




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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 9:08 am    Post subject: Re: Experience with GDFB plate harnesses         Reply with quote

Larry Bohnham wrote:
What have people's experiences been with either the Milanese or Cherbourgh plate armor offered by Get Dressed For Battle? How well do they fit and function? How's the build quality and durability? Also, what vendors out there are producing good plate?

Running a quick search on this forum will uncover a lot of information you desire. I can't speak for the Milanese harness, but I would not recommend the Churburg harness for anything but display in the corner. The gauntlets are a mess as several on this forum have mentioned in the past and the greaves are unshaped tubes.

I purchased the helm as a DIY project. After completely stripping it down, rebuilding it, and heavily modifying it I am happy with the end result.

...and that, my liege, is how we know the Earth to be banana shaped. - Sir Bedevere
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Quinn W.




Location: Bellingham, WA
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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 12:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have GDFB's European Breastplate. I got it to replace a total fantasy breastplate I have, but once I bought it I immediately started looking again. It is certainly wearable, but the fit was very awkward, and it looked even less well-fitting than it actually was. Structurally it's solid, and fit is the only complaint I had, but it was a major one. Just not very pleasant to wear, all in all.
"Some say that the age of chivalry is past, that the spirit of romance is dead. The age of chivalry is never past, so long as there is a wrong left unredressed on earth"
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 12:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quinn W. wrote:
I have GDFB's European Breastplate. I got it to replace a total fantasy breastplate I have, but once I bought it I immediately started looking again. It is certainly wearable, but the fit was very awkward, and it looked even less well-fitting than it actually was. Structurally it's solid, and fit is the only complaint I had, but it was a major one. Just not very pleasant to wear, all in all.


Mine was way too tight and narrow at the waist but I put it on the floor and used my full 260 pounds standing on it an gave it a sudden push off with my legs and it spread open to fit me perfectly. I did have to hammer out the lower raised rim that had puckered/buckled but the rest of the breast plate just opened up smoothly and evenly without creasing: This was pure dump luck as it might just as well folded and been damaged too much to repair with a few hammer blows.

Well for someone with a small to medium build the breast plate might work off the shelf but not so much for the " chunkier among us.

Here is a pic of the breast plate, the helm was by Valentine armoury, the brigantine is Windlass, the mail is from " The Maille Lord " and the full arms and legs from Mercenary Tailor's: The bottom of the BP is sort of hidden by my belts and the top somewhat hidden by the mail aventaile.

I like some of the GDFB helms but the suspension inside the helms are functional but far from perfect.



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Larry Bohnham





Joined: 20 May 2010

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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 6:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean, how do you like the Mercenary's Taylor bits?

Thanks for the input guys, I was afraid that the GDFB stuff would be one size fits few. I do like their helms though, having examined them up close. Who makes good plate at prices not too far above GDFB?

"No athlete can fight tenaciously who has never received any blows; he must see his blood flow and hear his teeth crack under the fist of his adversary..."
Roger of Hoveden, d.1201

a furore Normannorum libera nos Domine

"Henry, get down off that horse with that sword, you'll put someone's eye out!" Mrs. Bolingbroke's advice to her son, Henry, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt
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Scott Hrouda




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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 7:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Larry Bohnham wrote:
Who makes good plate at prices not too far above GDFB?
I'd start with Allan at The Mercenary's Tailor. I will personally recommend him for price, fit, communication and customer service.
...and that, my liege, is how we know the Earth to be banana shaped. - Sir Bedevere
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 8:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The option isn't listed on the MT site, but Allan is making me a single-piece breast with fauld for just under $200, shipped. Hard to go wrong there, I think. : )
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Jojo Zerach





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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 11:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have the gauntlets from the GDFB "Churburg harness".
Mine are quite constrictive and wouldn't allow you to grip a sword. They would have to be modified if they were to be used in any sort of live-sparring. (I use mine for display.)
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 4:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Larry Bohnham wrote:
Jean, how do you like the Mercenary's Taylor bits?



I like all my Mercenary Tailor's armour very much and I'm a long time customer and maybe I'm biased as I've promoted his work a lot over the years dues to the mentioned great customer service.

Keep in mind that it's " munitions armour " so no mirror polish and hammer marks are going to be visible but not excessive: Quality/price/customer service is great.

It's also " using " armour that functions and fits ( Although it is not custom fitted in the true sense, if you give Allan your measurements he can adjust the fit to a good degree ).

Now, if you want high end armour you will have to pay high end prices and have to ways months or years for your armour to be finished if you seek out the top makers. ( Full harness from a top maker can be in the five figures and take 5 years to get. One can order and get a helm in maybe a much shorter time but the prices can be from $750 to $3000 or up ).

Just check out the Forums with a search or go to the makers Forum where Allan posts about his armour and there are tons of comments by happy customers and a lot of information about armour.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Larry Bohnham





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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 8:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks folks. Yes, I'm looking for usable armour that doesn't have to be highly finished. I just need it to fit well and not bite me when I'm moving at full chat. Just like during the middle ages, true custom fitted armour made to order was frightfully expensive and took armorers years to construct. I can do without some of the frills and don't mind if modern production methods are used. The sword I have is an Albion 15th cent type XVa, the sharp of which is called the Mercenary, so it would follow that I should look to the Mercenary's Taylor for armour. I'd like to put together a reasonable kit that would have been seen at Agincourt but without having to expend Henry V's royal budget.

On that subject, I'm torn as far as helmets go. I've always wanted a hundsgugel visored bascinet but I'm concerned they would have been a bit passe' by 1415. Of course i could always remove the visor and go open faced with a gorget instead of the aventail, and just use the visor when I'm home late at night (chuckle). I could also go with that good 'ole standby the chapel de fer over a maille coif. What say all of you? I'm sure that many of the men at Agincourt were not necessarily dressed in the latest Milanese war fashions, so I think a bit of back dating might be reasonable.

"No athlete can fight tenaciously who has never received any blows; he must see his blood flow and hear his teeth crack under the fist of his adversary..."
Roger of Hoveden, d.1201

a furore Normannorum libera nos Domine

"Henry, get down off that horse with that sword, you'll put someone's eye out!" Mrs. Bolingbroke's advice to her son, Henry, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt
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Nathan Quarantillo




Location: Eastern Panhandle WV, USA
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 1:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah, a houndskull is totally feasable at Agincourt. Outdated armour (even by agincourt a houndskull wouldn't go in that category) didn't simply vanish off the face of the earth Wink
Especially if you are sporting MercTailor plate, that would be a nice look. MercTailor plate wouldn't work for anyone portraying a Duke or Earl or rich knight, but it's perfect for those portraying lower gentry, wealthy(er) commoners, well-equipped mercenaries, those in a retinue. and that's exactly the sort that would be likely seen with a houndskull at this time.
It also just has a good fighting "look" to it. You know? Cool

"Id rather be historically accurate than politically correct"
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Robert Hinds




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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 4:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

yea, I have to agree with nathan. Houndskulls would still have been worn, possibly even by the knights who weren't necesarily poor.

"This helmet suited me good 20 years ago and there's nothing wrong with it!"

In Christopher Gravetts book "Knight, Noble warrior of england 1200 - 1600" theres a spotlight on agincourt, and 2 of the 4 main figures in the illustration wear the houndskull, ones a dead french knight and the other an englishman wearing a brigandine.

"Young knight, learn to love God and revere women; thus your honor will grow. Practice knighthood and learn the Art that dignifies you, and brings you honor in wars." -Johannes Liechtenauer

"...And he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one..." Luke 22:36
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Larry Bohnham





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PostPosted: Tue 21 Dec, 2010 7:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, I'm working my way through that very book currently and the Agincourt side bar does have those illustrated. I am leaning toward the aforementioned bascinet, a brig with jupon, plate arms and legs over a short hauberk and arming jacket. Arms will probably be my type XVa, a war hammer, misericord, and a yet to be decided pole arm.

I've noticed that some 14th cent illustrations depict axes that are still very close to the venerable Dane axe, although I know that the poleaxe in various guises was becoming widespread by 1415. I've hefted the A&A "Knightly Poleaxe" and I wasn't all that impressed. It was quite heavy and cumbersome, did not fit in my hand very well (too thick and square), and the little vamplate or hand guard was annoying and prevented me from sliding the haft easily in my hands from guard to guard. Whereas the A&A Dane axe was light, well balanced and lent itself very well to the Japanese pole arms techniques that I have been trained in. So the question would be; would the Dane axe be totally out of line in an Agincourt scenario?

An English bill or a glaive would work for that era as well, but I think they were probably more for the yeoman conscript or specialist trooper than most of the nobility. Although a merc could have whatever he had managed to pick up on campaign. Plus I just don't think that either of those have the groovy factor of the Dane or poleaxe.

"No athlete can fight tenaciously who has never received any blows; he must see his blood flow and hear his teeth crack under the fist of his adversary..."
Roger of Hoveden, d.1201

a furore Normannorum libera nos Domine

"Henry, get down off that horse with that sword, you'll put someone's eye out!" Mrs. Bolingbroke's advice to her son, Henry, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt
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Robert Hinds




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PostPosted: Tue 21 Dec, 2010 7:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you want a pole axe without the rondel guard, windlass sells one, you can find it on KoA for $119

http://www.kultofathena.com/product.asp?item=...e=Pole+Axe

It has more of a crescent shaped axe head rather than A&A's flat edge, and a back spike instead of a hammer.

"Young knight, learn to love God and revere women; thus your honor will grow. Practice knighthood and learn the Art that dignifies you, and brings you honor in wars." -Johannes Liechtenauer

"...And he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one..." Luke 22:36
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Larry Bohnham





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PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2010 1:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah,
I looked at the Windlass one too and wasn't impressed with the metal bits, in particular I found the top spike a bit flimsy looking and didn't have much confidence in it surviving a full weight thrust in something that pushes back like plate or a brig. While I haven't personally played with the A&A Burgundian poleaxe, if it's like most of A&A's stuff it's probably pretty robust and it's lighter and cheaper than the (Kira)"Knightly" one.

Still wonder what everyone's opinion is on the Dane axe looking out of place with an Agincourt kit.

"No athlete can fight tenaciously who has never received any blows; he must see his blood flow and hear his teeth crack under the fist of his adversary..."
Roger of Hoveden, d.1201

a furore Normannorum libera nos Domine

"Henry, get down off that horse with that sword, you'll put someone's eye out!" Mrs. Bolingbroke's advice to her son, Henry, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2010 7:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The long-hafted axe of the "Dane Axe" type continued in use up to about 1600, albeit in a pretty isolated cultural context (Irish Gallowglass) so it's certainly feasible for the early 15th. Cultural/geographic feasibility for Agincourt is a different consideration and I can't help much there. Bear in mind that the halberd "evolved" from the long axe due to the axe's weakness below the socket. First you got an extended lower end pinned to the haft (think bardiche), then that pinned end turned into a second socket. Then you reconfigured the top of the blade to allow more efficient thrusting. Back spikes were added between the sockets and finally the sockets and back spike merged to form a single socket and langets help strengthen the part of the haft that was the Dane axe's weakenss. To carry a long axe at Agincourt is to be behind the times, technologically, but I personally would make it a point not to stand opposite you. :-) I have read that some special U.S. units in Iraq favor the Colt 1911 design and cartridge although they could have anything they want, from slingshots to laser-guided vampire bats.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Larry Bohnham





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PostPosted: Thu 23 Dec, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The more I've thought about it, the more I see the Dane as a bit of stretch for this scenario. I'm still going to get one for my own amusement, but I think the Agincourt rig will probably have the Burgundian poleaxe. Although the long axe could do for a Cr'ecy kit.

An aside; many operators in USSOCOM went back to the M1911 in .45 ACP in the early '90's after their less than heart warming experiences with the M9 in 9X19mm. The trend continues today with other makes of .45's now in use as well, particularly the H&K USP and Glock 21sf. I'm afraid we Yankee infidels just haven't tired of the idea of one large slug dropping the Tango instead of needing to empty 15 rounds into the poor schmuck. PS, we also are not using the Geneva friendly full metal jacket loads for said pistols anymore either; the tactical situation in the sand box simply demands the stopping power of a decent hollow point munition, sorry UN.

"We can rest easy in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm."
George Orwell

De Oppresso Libre

"No athlete can fight tenaciously who has never received any blows; he must see his blood flow and hear his teeth crack under the fist of his adversary..."
Roger of Hoveden, d.1201

a furore Normannorum libera nos Domine

"Henry, get down off that horse with that sword, you'll put someone's eye out!" Mrs. Bolingbroke's advice to her son, Henry, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt
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