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Mrak E.Smith





Joined: 30 Sep 2006

Posts: 55

PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 3:45 am    Post subject: How plate amour be repaired historically?         Reply with quote

Hi guys, there's a question I wonder and have never see discussed before( forgive me if I'm wrong and please give me the link of the related topic): How plate armour be repaired? they are combat tools and must be exposed to continuous strike and damage ,and iron or steel plate 1-2mm thick is not immune to such damage completely, even the man in the armour were saved from being hurt, there must be dent , hole on it ,and must be repaired.

In the case of mail \lamellar\coat of plates the solution is relatively easy, just replace the damaged ring or small plates, but in plate armour, some parts are large and expersive to be replaced altogether, especially the breastplate ,which are most possible to be striked , won't that be a serious disadvantage compare to mail, lamellar or brigandine in cost, when common soldiers rely goverment to provide their armour? If not replaced completely, are technics such as patching used?

Any opinion on the question is OK , but more historical evidences are most welcomed.
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

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PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 3:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

They had a type of "spackle", made from casein glue and a few other ingredients, that was used to patch holes in metal plate.
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Mrak E.Smith





Joined: 30 Sep 2006

Posts: 55

PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 4:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan Howard wrote:
They had a type of "spackle", made from casein glue and a few other ingredients, that was used to patch holes in metal plate.

thanks Dan, that's an interesting method I didn't expect. Any further historical references? How about the strength of that kind of patch?
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Randall Moffett




Location: Northern Utah
Joined: 07 Jun 2006
Reading list: 5 books

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PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 6:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

They also used metal patches and cover plates. We had some breastplates that had been shot through from the 17th century and they simply had a patch put in from the back, hammered and riveted in. Once polished it was not even something you could see.

RPM
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James Arlen Gillaspie
Industry Professional



Location: upstate NY
Joined: 10 Nov 2005

Posts: 524

PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 9:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Copper brazed repairs (often with a backing plate, the whole shebang hot riveted in while the copper was molten) were very common. It makes for an extremely strong repair, though it would require retempering good steel armour, unless it's Italian (pearlitic microstructure). Not a big deal, since brazing heat is right for hardening anyway!
jamesarlen.com
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Kel Rekuta




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 10 Feb 2004
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Posts: 603

PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 10:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan Howard wrote:
They had a type of "spackle", made from casein glue and a few other ingredients, that was used to patch holes in metal plate.


You having a bad week or something, Dan? Confused
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Mrak E.Smith





Joined: 30 Sep 2006

Posts: 55

PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 10:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

James Arlen Gillaspie wrote:
Copper brazed repairs (often with a backing plate, the whole shebang hot riveted in while the copper was molten) were very common. It makes for an extremely strong repair, though it would require retempering good steel armour, unless it's Italian (pearlitic microstructure). Not a big deal, since brazing heat is right for hardening anyway!

Thanks, brazing is another technic I can easily understand(appeared in the movie A Knight's Tale), but again is there any historical evidence? like a museum speciman threated exactly so? As far as I saw, most museum armour don't even have slight battle damage~
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JŠnos Sibinger




Location: Hungary/France
Joined: 31 May 2009

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 2:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greetings!
This question always kept me thinking, and one day in the Arsenal of Graz, I saw the answer! (Please note the picture!) Sorry for the poor quality of the photo, it was made in a dark room with my phone, but still, it could give you an idea! Happy
John



 Attachment: 147.49 KB
Repaired armour from Graz [ Download ]
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Scott Hrouda




Location: Minnesota, USA
Joined: 17 Nov 2006
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PostPosted: Tue 09 Nov, 2010 2:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

JŠnos Sibinger wrote:
Greetings!
This question always kept me thinking, and one day in the Arsenal of Graz, I saw the answer! (Please note the picture!) Sorry for the poor quality of the photo, it was made in a dark room with my phone, but still, it could give you an idea! Happy
John


I've seen a very similar repair at a museum in Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Germany. I'll look through my old photographs to see if I have a snapshot.

...and that, my liege, is how we know the Earth to be banana shaped. - Sir Bedevere
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