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Robin Smith




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 4:24 pm    Post subject: a question about Scotch Brite Pads         Reply with quote

Hi guys... Been a few years since I stopped by...

...Anyway, I have a question about long term maintenance of swords and the effects on blade geometry. Specifically, how much use of a scotch brite pad to restore the finish can a sword take before you have to start worrying about significant changes to blade geometry?

Is the Scotch Brite pad mostly just adjusting the finish, or is it actually removing metal? Is it something one can use from time to time without worry, or is it something that should be reserved for only when absolutely needed? I know it sounds silly, but its something I've been wondering about....

A furore Normannorum libera nos, Domine
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JE Sarge
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 4:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've used them for years with no noticable effects. I use them after every time I cut to get marring off the blade, as well as when I get discoloration, handling marks, rust, etc. I am sure some metal is removed, but it has to be a microscopic amount over time - I've never noticed a difference in swords I have used them time and time again on. Happy
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B. Stark
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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 5:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Scotch brite does 'remove' metal, in fact any agent that 'scrathes the surface 'removes' metal, but it would literally take decades of constant polishing with the medium to notice a discernable change in edge geometry. So in short not to worry, polish away. I recommend red scotch brite over grey.
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Luke Zechman




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 5:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have recently been finishing a bare blade from Albion. My plan has been to start with 6o grit sandpaper, and work up to a 220. I have been rubbing and rubbing and rubbing and rubbing and rubbing and rubbing for two weeks off and on. I just dropped to 80 grit paper. You should be ok if you are just getting the surface of the blade to have a consistent texture. I would even go so far as to challenge you to "significantly" change the blade geometry without a power tool. I use scotch bright pads to buff out marks from cutting. I wouldn't worry about it.
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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 6:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

B. Stark wrote:
Scotch brite does 'remove' metal, in fact any agent that 'scrathes the surface 'removes' metal, but it would literally take decades of constant polishing with the medium to notice a discernable change in edge geometry. So in short not to worry, polish away. I recommend red scotch brite over grey.


By red, do you mean purple? Or am I color blind? Happy

It's the "fine" grit, whereas gray is "super fine," right? I've recently discovered that myself and it's awesome. Works much faster than gray, leaves a very similar finish that can be made identical with a brief topcoat of gray.

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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 7:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Won't change the geometry of the blade to any significant degree even if used for years but one must be careful about not dulling very sharp edges when sanding close to the edges.

Also with very sharp edged one can lose some skin on the finger tips if one's fingers touch the edges by accident ! Often nothing more than the equivalent to nasty paper cuts i.e. not deep but annoying. Oh, and wash your hands after with rubbing alcohol to see if you did take off a layer of skin of the tips of your finger. Wink Razz ( Well don't, just a very mean joke if you actually did use the rubbing alcohol ....... OUCH. Wink Razz Laughing Out Loud ).

Oh, avoid the edges if you want to keep the sword sharp or plan on giving the edges a light touch up after using the pads

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Scott Hrouda




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PostPosted: Fri 27 Aug, 2010 8:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Found a neat Scotch Bright table to share with everyone:

http://academic.evergreen.edu/projects/biophysics/technotes/fabric/finish.pdf

...and that, my liege, is how we know the Earth to be banana shaped. - Sir Bedevere
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 11:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I ordered some of those maroon scotch brites. I'm excited to see how they work!

Many they can get ride of some of those "stains" left over from rust. BTW guys are those stains permanent or can they be removed?
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Colt Reeves





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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 1:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, there shouldn't be stains left by rust (after grinding it out with just about anything), which leads me to believe that you either aren't getting all the rust or that whatever you're working on has a rough finish and rust particles are being rubbed into grooves and whatnot. Regardless you can get rid of the stains by putting some more elbow grease into it. May I ask what you are presently using? And maybe you could provide a picture or two of these stains?

Concerning the OP, I simply use 2000 grit automotive sandpaper on my stuff. I think I've asked this before but no harm in asking again: Is there any reason any of you would reccomend against this? Are you aware of any pros or cons using this as opposed to the ever-popular Scotch-Brite products?
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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 1:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Scott Hrouda wrote:
Found a neat Scotch Bright table to share with everyone:

http://academic.evergreen.edu/projects/biophysics/technotes/fabric/finish.pdf


Thanks! That's fantastic.

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
I ordered some of those maroon scotch brites. I'm excited to see how they work!

Many they can get ride of some of those "stains" left over from rust. BTW guys are those stains permanent or can they be removed?


You're likely talking about pits. While nothing is permanent while you have enough steel left to remove, you're not going to get pits out with scotch brite, and you won'te get them off without taking off quite a bit of steel.

I suggest you just leave them. They are historically correct, after all. Happy

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Last edited by Michael Edelson on Sat 28 Aug, 2010 1:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Joel Chesser




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 1:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've got a question for you guys, Im sure this is suppossed to fall under the "it's not rocket science" catagory, however there are times when i like to have things spelled out for me. The question is this: do you guys use the scotch brite pags in conjunction with a polish, or just the bare pads?
..." The person who dosen't have a sword should sell his coat and buy one."

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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 2:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joel Chesser wrote:
I've got a question for you guys, Im sure this is suppossed to fall under the "it's not rocket science" catagory, however there are times when i like to have things spelled out for me. The question is this: do you guys use the scotch brite pags in conjunction with a polish, or just the bare pads?


It depends. I'm I'm trying to put a final finish on something, I often use Metal-Glo on a gray ScotchBrite pad. If I'm just scrubbing to remove stuff, I don't usually bother with the polish.

Happy

ChadA

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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 2:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Edelson wrote:
Scott Hrouda wrote:
Found a neat Scotch Bright table to share with everyone:

http://academic.evergreen.edu/projects/biophysics/technotes/fabric/finish.pdf


Thanks! That's fantastic.

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
I ordered some of those maroon scotch brites. I'm excited to see how they work!

Many they can get ride of some of those "stains" left over from rust. BTW guys are those stains permanent or can they be removed?


You're likely talking about pits. While nothing is permanent while you have enough steel left to remove, you're not going to get pits out with scotch brite, and you won'te get them off without taking off quite a bit of steel.

I suggest you just leave them. They are historically correct, after all. Happy


I think you are correct. It is frustrating, though, that I do keep my stuff oiled. I read posts on the Marketplace about swords that are years old with zero blemishes of any kind.

These "pits" are quite small but still annoying.
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Robin Smith




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PostPosted: Sat 28 Aug, 2010 3:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Colt Reeves wrote:
Well, there shouldn't be stains left by rust (after grinding it out with just about anything), which leads me to believe that you either aren't getting all the rust or that whatever you're working on has a rough finish and rust particles are being rubbed into grooves and whatnot. Regardless you can get rid of the stains by putting some more elbow grease into it. May I ask what you are presently using? And maybe you could provide a picture or two of these stains?

Concerning the OP, I simply use 2000 grit automotive sandpaper on my stuff. I think I've asked this before but no harm in asking again: Is there any reason any of you would reccomend against this? Are you aware of any pros or cons using this as opposed to the ever-popular Scotch-Brite products?

I've always used it since that is what Albion recommends...

As for pits and their removal, I have managed to get very minor black dot pitting out with scotch brite before. But they have to be caught early, and cannot be deep at all. One thing I have learned from maintaining armour is that some pits will come out, and some will not. The really small ones tend to come out fairly easily with alittle elbow grease, but above a certain size and they ain't comin out, atleast not with a scotch brite pad..

That is actually what lead to this question....

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