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Sam Salvati




Location: NY
Joined: 10 Feb 2007

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Fri 28 May, 2010 10:16 am    Post subject: New offset forging hammer         Reply with quote

I know this isn't a sword, but it involves the making of them Big Grin

This style of hammer is very prevalent in both the Japanese and European blademaking traditions. I Europe it is known as a doghead hammer, in Japan it is known as a cutler's hammer.

Forged this up yesterday from 4140. I was doing some R&D trying to figure out a way to make the eye hole easier, after all these things I tried the foolproof and quickest way was just to do it by hand :rolleyes: . But I did come away with a new technique to drift the hole so it is angled like the traditional ones without dealing with starting with an angled slot. This one came out at about 2.5 pounds. I am used to 1045 for hammers, this 4140 is very different but good. Hopefully I can get the HT down with this steel just as easy as with 1045.








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Philip Montgomery




Location: Houston
Joined: 29 May 2008
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PostPosted: Fri 28 May, 2010 11:09 am    Post subject: Re: New offset forging hammer         Reply with quote

Sam Salvati wrote:

This style of hammer is very prevalent in both the Japanese and European blademaking traditions. I Europe it is known as a doghead hammer, in Japan it is known as a cutler's hammer.

Forged this up yesterday from 4140.


Hi Sam,

That is beautiful. I am interested in hammers for bladesmithing. I have only been forging metal and working on an anvil for about six months. Before that I was strictly doing stock removal. So what is the specific function of a doghead hammer? How do you use it when making a blade? Are there historical examples of this tool and how it was used for bladesmithing? Thanks for sharing.

Philip Montgomery
~-----~
"A broken sword blade fwipping through the air like a scythe through rye does demand attention."
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Sam Salvati




Location: NY
Joined: 10 Feb 2007

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Fri 28 May, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Phil it's just another type of hammer in the arsenal, the japanese used them alot because it is comfortable to use when sitting down. The design also alters your swing a bit, the hammer sort of "pulls" itself in a way, hard to describe you have to feel it. if you look in craft of the japanese sword, you will see many different versions.
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Allan Senefelder
Industry Professional



Location: Upstate NY
Joined: 18 Oct 2003

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PostPosted: Fri 28 May, 2010 7:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sam, excellent job! The rough finish with clean work surface looks much like alot of the antique hammers we use.
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: Fri 28 May, 2010 9:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Similar types are not really new in the U.S.. They are called "doghead" here, as well as "sawyers", and "cutlers" hammers. I had been contemplating purchasing one from a U.S. saw specialty company. http://www.hanchett.com/hammer.html
Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Sam Salvati




Location: NY
Joined: 10 Feb 2007

Posts: 20

PostPosted: Sat 29 May, 2010 10:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Allen! I like the rough finish, utilitarian hehe. I wish I could do polished hammers like Brent Bailey does! I'd rather keep my belts for blades though.

Jared, the main difference between a doghead or saw tuner's hammer is that on those the handle is usually 90 degrees to the head, to keep your hand and knuckles from banging into the saw while you are hitting on it, while the cutler's hammers are angled. I have seen and handled antique versions of both, a European Saw tuner's, as well as a Japanese bladesmiths hammer.

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Harry J. Fletcher




Location: Lost in Texas
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PostPosted: Sun 30 May, 2010 1:31 pm    Post subject: And....         Reply with quote

...well folks, looks like hammerhead does it again. thanks and a tip o' the hat to Blackie Sam...!
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
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PostPosted: Sun 30 May, 2010 4:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sam Salvati wrote:


Jared, the main difference between a doghead or saw tuner's hammer is that on those the handle is usually 90 degrees to the head, to keep your hand and knuckles from banging into the saw while you are hitting on it, while the cutler's hammers are angled. I have seen and handled antique versions of both, a European Saw tuner's, as well as a Japanese bladesmiths hammer.


I realize you may never get the opportunity again, but, if you do, please photograph some of these!

I am not sure that I grasp the "knuckle banging" explanation given that it just looks hard to do with the head geometry. Turning the handle looks like it would make a negligible difference in that area as far as I can figure. I have seen some videos of the Japanese versions at work. If I remember it right, the heads are slightly curved such that the hammer would not be good for reaching into the center of a large circular saw blade without again running into interference with one's knuckles. It would not surprise me if the saw turner's handle orientation had more to do with comfort in how one's wrist works best to assist in control while flattening. I figure that in the case of the saw turners hammer (circular blades) we are talking about delicate flattening here.

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