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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Mon 03 May, 2010 5:16 pm    Post subject: Using Renaissance Wax         Reply with quote

I received some Renaissance Wax and I have a few questions,

1. Do I need to be very diligent about removing the oil I have on my swords before applying the wax? To remove the oil can I just use a damp cloth then dry one or do I need to use windex? I don't have any right now.

2. How often should I reapply the wax and how do I remove it before reapplying the new coat?

3. Do I need to reapply after dry handling? If I accidentally touch the blade do I need to reapply as I would with normal oil?

What experiences have folks had in using using Renaissance Wax? Any recommendations? I decided on it as I want to minimize oiling- I go for significant periods without handling my swords.

Thanks
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Bryce Felperin




Location: San Jose, CA
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PostPosted: Mon 03 May, 2010 5:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Using Renaissance Wax         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
I received some Renaissance Wax and I have a few questions,

1. Do I need to be very diligent about removing the oil I have on my swords before applying the wax? To remove the oil can I just use a damp cloth then dry one or do I need to use windex? I don't have any right now.

2. How often should I reapply the wax and how do I remove it before reapplying the new coat?

3. Do I need to reapply after dry handling? If I accidentally touch the blade do I need to reapply as I would with normal oil?

What experiences have folks had in using using Renaissance Wax? I decided on it as I want to minimize oiling- I go for significant periods without handling my swords.

Thanks


I can't answer for others but I can answer your questions myself in the order you asked as I use it.

1. I use both WD-40 and Ren Wax, sometimes at the same time. If my weapons have been handled a lot, say at a Ren faire or demo, then I spray on WD-40 and then apply Ren Wax afterwards. You probably should use a dry cloth and "wipe away" any oil before applying the Ren Wax though. Both Ren wax and oil will wear away on their own so I don't bother using Windex unless I need to clean the blade...and WD-40 does that just as well with a dry cloth.

2. I apply the wax as soon as I acquire a new weapon or armor, and then reapply it if I'm going to be taking it out for heavy use. Otherwise I just re-apply after use and cleaning. You don't really have to remove it...I've found it wears off in use.

3. I don't reapply usually unless it needs it. If you have a fingerprint on the metal then I rub it away and put a small dab of wax there (or WD-40, depends on my mood or the level of handling).

I like Ren wax more than oil because it isn't as "messy". If I'm in my Ren faire garb it is really bad getting an oil stain from an over-oiled sword or when a drop comes off the weapon when you take it out of its scabbard. Also it doesn't leave your hands messy either so you leave oil all around the encampment or your house.

The wax also can last a long time protecting your item and you can wax leather grips, scabbards and wood fittings as well with no staining or harm. So I spread it all around my weapons.

However the wax wears off if you handle the item a lot, so you'll need to reapply it after you're done handling it for the day. I use the WD-40 when I anticipate a lot of handling or after the day to clean off the weapon/item and before re-applying the wax...or I just wax the item after the WD-40 has been on it for a day or two.

I have stored my swords away, in their scabbards, in the safe in my storage locker for months after applying just Ren wax to them and get no rust or corrosion on anything. It's pretty durable long term stuff. I apply a light coat and work in with a dry cloth. I also apply it to the grip and hilt parts too.

Best of luck with it,

Bryce
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
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PostPosted: Mon 03 May, 2010 8:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

While I rarely offer anyone Wikipedia as a primary source, I had to chuckle the last time I saw the page. It includes a footnote to an article I have been posting quite a bit over the past decade. Some considerations worth reading.

http://cool-palimpsest.stanford.edu/byform/ma.../0453.html

http://cool.conservation-us.org/coolaic/jaic/...1-001.html


Ya, clean and then apply as needed. One fellow was having problems with it and rusting but I have to wonder what the prep and handling was like. I would suggest not using the stuff (or any hard candy coating) on more open blade steels that have been folded and something you later want to polish. Particularly, don't use it on a blade that will be going to a traditional polisher of Japanese styles.

Woodworkers seem to like it and is cheaper there except when looking for pints, quarts and gallons.

Cheers

GC
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Mon 03 May, 2010 8:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

So am I correct that ren wax lasts longer than normal oiling? This is my hope.

How do you know when it has "worn off"? I put some on a knife and can't perceive any tell tale signs it is applied.
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Martin Francis




Location: Northumberland, UK
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PostPosted: Tue 04 May, 2010 9:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have used this material for more than 7 years on reproduction metal items, including blades, used for display and handling purposes in a re-enactment context. This would involve some 15/20 multi day shows per year and I have found it to be very effective at preventing corrosion arising from handling and general exposure.

I am aware of the variation of opinion in it's use on museum ethnographic exhibits, but since none of my collection fall into this category, I am happy with the results obtained. I agree that if properly applied and buffed it is difficult to determine whether or not it is applied but in general I would only reapply 2 - 3 times per year. Subject to the normal caveats about always cleaning after shows with a suitable duster, cleaning off surface dirt and never putting anything away damp i've never had a problem.

Obviously I would not deliberately use it on blades or items used for food preparation or consumption, although I cannot recall any problems arising when I have inadvertently used such items myself. In a similar vein, if it was to be used on blades used for combat or cutting practice, then i would recommend reapplication after each use simply due to damage to the coating through impact or abrasion.

It is unquestionably less messy than oil or grease and minimises problems with 3rd party handling. I might be quite sanguine about oil or grease on my period clothes in the context of normal use, a member of the paying public might be less happy with it on the designer suit........

Some of my more literal-minded colleagues might be less happy at it's non authenticity but provided that I explain the context and the materials in actual contemporaneous usage, I believe it to be a reasonable and practical compromise that should fit your defined need well.

Martin
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Bryce Felperin




Location: San Jose, CA
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PostPosted: Tue 04 May, 2010 9:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Martin Francis wrote:
I have used this material for more than 7 years on reproduction metal items, including blades, used for display and handling purposes in a re-enactment context. This would involve some 15/20 multi day shows per year and I have found it to be very effective at preventing corrosion arising from handling and general exposure.

I am aware of the variation of opinion in it's use on museum ethnographic exhibits, but since none of my collection fall into this category, I am happy with the results obtained. I agree that if properly applied and buffed it is difficult to determine whether or not it is applied but in general I would only reapply 2 - 3 times per year. Subject to the normal caveats about always cleaning after shows with a suitable duster, cleaning off surface dirt and never putting anything away damp i've never had a problem.

Obviously I would not deliberately use it on blades or items used for food preparation or consumption, although I cannot recall any problems arising when I have inadvertently used such items myself. In a similar vein, if it was to be used on blades used for combat or cutting practice, then i would recommend reapplication after each use simply due to damage to the coating through impact or abrasion.

It is unquestionably less messy than oil or grease and minimises problems with 3rd party handling. I might be quite sanguine about oil or grease on my period clothes in the context of normal use, a member of the paying public might be less happy with it on the designer suit........

Some of my more literal-minded colleagues might be less happy at it's non authenticity but provided that I explain the context and the materials in actual contemporaneous usage, I believe it to be a reasonable and practical compromise that should fit your defined need well.

Martin


Well said Martin!
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Tue 04 May, 2010 10:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ok so I will put it on my Albions and A&A pieces but not on any wrought. I guess it would also be fine on inlay?

You know I used to be a real stickler for authenticity even extending into maintenance but since my collection has grown I just want less fuss.

Whenever- emphasis on whenever- I finally get my Barta which will have some iron and iron inlay I will use typical oil.

Thanks guys. If anyone has anything to add please feel free. . . .
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Wed 19 May, 2010 12:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Update on the Renaissance Wax. Not good to use on inlay. I used it on a small knife with copper and silver inlay and it dulls the color of the inlay significantly- especially the silver.
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Blaz Berlec




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PostPosted: Wed 19 May, 2010 1:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Even if you "rub it in" until it's completely transparent? I can't imagine that, I fount that it gives much less colouration to metals than oiling them (which darkens them considerably).

I must say I'm impressed with this product, I bought it just for the Albion Earl, but seeing how useful it is and how little it is needed for one application I use it for most of my steel and iron items. It might be relatively expensive, but 200ml can goes a long way.


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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Wed 19 May, 2010 2:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm really more inclined to go with Mother or McGuires based on the cost of the stuff. Good autowax should have similar protecting properties on metal so I don't think the results would be that much different.
"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Wed 19 May, 2010 6:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Blaz Berlec wrote:
Even if you "rub it in" until it's completely transparent? I can't imagine that, I fount that it gives much less colouration to metals than oiling them (which darkens them considerably).

I must say I'm impressed with this product, I bought it just for the Albion Earl, but seeing how useful it is and how little it is needed for one application I use it for most of my steel and iron items. It might be relatively expensive, but 200ml can goes a long way.


I don't know. . . . I have buffed and buffed. The problem is that the non-sterling silver looks completely dull and with little to no sheen. The copper does look different than when I used oil but not really much so- just a bit more dull. The silver is totally different and unattractive.
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