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Bram Verbeek





Joined: 27 Mar 2007

Posts: 217

PostPosted: Sat 23 May, 2009 8:51 am    Post subject: An XVII in XVIII times?         Reply with quote

Hello, due to the nice little thing called full-time job, I can now purchase not only books and steel for grinding, but also a sword made by someone who knows what he is doing.

My eyes quickly wandered over many makers, and for a price/practicality and method of design, my view turned to Angus Trim. There are many beatiful blades on his site, but one struck out in particular, the Lady Ash AT 1526. This blade is close to the sword discribed as the leading example of the Sempach family in weight (according to this site's XVII page) and the lines on the blade (if I am correct, a fuller about 1/3 of the blade, another third hexagonal and the last part diamond) are simply beautiful.

While the configuration with a disc pommel and a straight guard (that would be a modification that pleases my eyes more) would be beautiful, I was also thinking how this kind of blade might fare in later times.

I, like many of us, have always been intrigued by the S guard common to the XVIIIb, and in particular the Munich museum one. While my funds do not reach Albion's rendition of it, and I can only justify one blade this year, I got thinking.

A blade the weight of this one, somewhat lighter then a common XVIIIb, and semi-thrusting focus, might well be maintained with a renewed guard and pommel in later times, thus a waisted grip, a wheel pommel and an S guard would be possible, if not probable.

The question here is when those S guards came into focus, and if there are finds that I might have missed that used a similar (the same is not neccesary) configuration.
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Sean Flynt
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Location: Birmingham, Alabama
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PostPosted: Sat 23 May, 2009 10:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As far as I can tell, those guards are approximately 1475-1525. FWIW, I just recurved a straight Angus Trim cross without the slightest trouble. Propane torch, hammer, 25# anvil. It's a very simple job. Filing facets and other details is even easier.

As for Type XVII, Dürer shows hilts like you describe mounted on long blades with fullers in their upper half. It's not clear if they're hexagonal, but I think what you propose is historically plausible. Many blades had long working lives.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Bram Verbeek





Joined: 27 Mar 2007

Posts: 217

PostPosted: Sat 23 May, 2009 11:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That makes me a happy person, I will try and sketch out the details to make an order before the weekend is over. How I did not look at Durer before asking you people is beyond me now...

I knew that bending a straight guard could be done, I read your article and was intrigued. I may try and order the lady ash with a wheel pommel and a straight guard, so the transition is easiest. A wheel pommel and straight guard would also work for the longest period.

Would anyone have a larger picture of said blade? Google does not do well for this specific question..
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Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Sat 23 May, 2009 12:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Have you considered the Arms and Armor Durer sword? -- http://www.arms-n-armor.com/sword195.html - It has most of the features you are looking for. It is more expensive than an AT1526 would be, less than the equivalent Albion. There is a favorable review of the sword on this site (indicating an old price) http://www.myArmoury.com/review_aa_dur.html
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Bram Verbeek





Joined: 27 Mar 2007

Posts: 217

PostPosted: Sat 23 May, 2009 3:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have considered that piece, but, while it may be an excellent example, it is a bit steep in price, I'd rather spend that money in a new practice weapon that matches the sharpened piece, or set it aside for the inevitable car change in the coming years.
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George P.





Joined: 14 Aug 2007

Posts: 25

PostPosted: Sat 23 May, 2009 3:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There are some S guard finds from the last quarter of the 14th century in southeastern Europe.
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Bram Verbeek





Joined: 27 Mar 2007

Posts: 217

PostPosted: Sun 24 May, 2009 1:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you, I will look them up. I still think of buying a straight guard and older style grip, and changing it when I feel like it, I just wanted to ask if it was plausible for the future project. Of course, chances are I will then opt for a new blade so as not to marr this one.
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